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Immunization Action Coalition
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IAC Express
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2018 Issues
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Issue 1390
Issue 1391: October 24, 2018


TOP STORIES


IAC HANDOUTS

VACCINE INFORMATION STATEMENTS


OFFICIAL RELEASES AND ANNOUNCEMENTS


FEATURED RESOURCES


JOURNAL ARTICLES AND NEWSLETTERS

 


TOP STORIES


New! 65+ Flu Defense website features tools and resources for healthcare professionals serving adults age 65 and older 

Annual influenza vaccination is the best way to prevent influenza, but vaccination coverage among older adults in the U.S. has stagnated, and in some years has declined significantly over the previous season’s rate. In the 2016–2017 season, only 65.3% of adults age 65 and older were vaccinated against the flu.

However, seniors are at greater risk of severe complications from influenza, due both to their increased likelihood of having chronic conditions and to the decline of their immune systems with aging.
 
As a healthcare provider (HCP), your strong, confident recommendation for flu vaccine is a very powerful and persuasive tool in determining if your patients are vaccinated. To assist you in this effort, the new 65+ Flu Defense website at www.influenza-defense.org has been launched. This project, a collaboration between IAC and Seqirus, aims to reach HCPs with information, tools, and resources they need to better communicate the impact of flu and its complications in older adults, and to proactively discuss flu vaccination with their patients age 65 and older.
 
65+ Flu Defense is divided into several easy-to-use topic areas, including:  

Two new patient handouts are also available on the website:



Be sure to check out the information and printable materials for your patients available on the 65+ Flu Defense website at www.influenza-defense.org to help your efforts in protecting this vulnerable population.

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CDC presents information about the 386 confirmed cases of acute flaccid myelitis in the U.S. in 2018

On Tuesday, October 17, CDC hosted a media telebriefing on acute flaccid myelitis (AFM) in the U.S. featuring Dr. Nancy Messonnier, director of CDC’s National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases. Portions of the transcript are reprinted below.

AFM is a rare, but serious condition that affects the nervous system. It specifically affects the area of spinal cord called gray matter and causes muscles and reflexes to become weak. We know this can be frightening for parents. I know many parents want to know what the signs and symptoms are that they should be looking for in their child. I encourage parents to seek medical care right away if you or your child develop sudden weakness or loss of muscle tone in the arms or legs. CDC has been actively investigating AFM, testing specimens and monitoring disease since 2014 when we first saw an increase in cases. The number of cases reported in this time period in 2018 is similar to what was reported in the fall of 2014 and 2016. Since 2014, most of the AFM cases have been among children. In 2018 so far, CDC has received reports of 127 patients under investigation or PUIs; 62 cases have been confirmed as AFM (in 22 states) –edited for clarity. CDC and state and local health departments are still investigating some of these PUIs. Of the confirmed cases, the average age is about 4 years old. More than 90 percent of the cases are in children age 18 years and younger....

We expect that the case count may vary from week to week as our experts work with local and state health departments to investigate their PUIs. Based on previous years, most AFM cases occur in the late summer and fall. The data we are reporting today is a substantially larger number than in previous months this year. CDC recently received increased reports for patients suspected to have AFM with an onset of symptoms in August and September. With enhanced efforts working with state and local health departments and hospitals we were able to confirm a number of these cases faster....

We understand that people particularly parents are concerned about AFM. Right now, we know that poliovirus is not the cause of these AFM cases. CDC has tested every stool specimen from the AFM patients, none of the specimens have tested positive for the poliovirus. AFM can be caused by other viruses, such as enterovirus and West Nile virus, environmental toxins and a condition where the body’s immune system attacks and destroys body tissue that it mistakes for foreign material. While we know that these can cause AFM, we have not been able to find a cause for the majority of these AFM cases. The reason why we don’t know about AFM — and I am frustrated that despite all of our efforts we haven’t been able to identify the cause of this mystery illness — we continue to investigate to better understand the clinical picture of AFM cases, risk factors and possible causes of the increase in cases....


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CDC publishes "Mumps Outbreak in a Marshallese Community Denver Metropolitan Area, Colorado, 2016–2017" in this week’s MMWR

CDC published Mumps Outbreak in a Marshallese Community Denver Metropolitan Area, Colorado, 2016–2017 in the October 19 issue of MMWR (pages 1143–1146). The first paragraph is reprinted below.

In January 2017, the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment (CDPHE) identified four epidemiologically linked cases of mumps among persons from a Marshallese community who were members of the same church in the Denver metropolitan area. During 2016–2017, sizable outbreaks of mumps reported in Arkansas, Hawaii, and Washington also affected the Marshallese population. CDPHE, the Tri-County Health Department (TCHD), and Denver Public Health collaborated to conduct an outbreak investigation during January–March 2017 using active and passive surveillance that identified 17 confirmed and 30 probable cases. Public health actions included conducting measles-mumps-rubella (MMR) vaccination clinics at local Marshallese churches; these resulted in the vaccination of 126 persons with ≥1 doses of MMR vaccine. Implementation of active surveillance and support from local Marshallese church leaders in promoting vaccination programs likely contributed to interruption of the outbreak.

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Ask the Experts Q&As on rotavirus, varicella, and rabies recently updated 

IAC recently reviewed and updated its Ask the Experts: Rotavirus, Ask the Experts: Varicella, and Ask the Experts: Rabies web pages.

Ask the Experts: Rotavirus: Revisions were made to the structure of the set to more closely resemble other ATE sets, along with updated links and references. There are no new recommendations.

Ask the Experts: Varicella: Revisions include reorganization and creation of a new vaccine safety section, an update of website links, and additional information about the use of Varicella Zoster Immune Globulin (VZIG). There are no new recommendations.

Ask the Experts: Rabies: Revisions include updates of rabies epidemiology and inclusion of additional information about rabies immune globulin. There are no new recommendations.

IAC’s Ask the Experts web section is a compilation of common as well as challenging questions and answers (Q&As) about vaccines and their administration. William Atkinson, MD, MPH, IAC's associate director for immunization education, manages this web section, with answers provided by Mark S. Freedman, DVM, MPH, DACVPM; Andrew T. Kroger, MD, MPH; Tina S. Objio, MSN, MHA, RN; Candice L. Robinson, MD, MPH; Raymond A. Strikas, MD, MPH, FACP, FIDSA; and JoEllen Wolicki, BSN, RN, all from the National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases, CDC.

IAC Express publishes five special editions each year of Ask the Experts Q&As answered by CDC experts. You can access the four most recent IAC Express Ask the Experts sets of Q&As from the main web page of Ask the Experts, in the right-hand column.

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September's Technically Speaking column by IAC executive director Dr. Deborah Wexler is titled "What's New for Flu This Season?"

Technically Speaking is a monthly column written by IAC executive director Dr. Deborah Wexler for Vaccine Update for Healthcare Providers, a monthly e-newsletter from the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia. September's column is titled "What's New for Flu This Season?" and is reprinted below.

Every month, the Technically Speaking column covers practical topics in immunization, such as vaccine administration, immunization scheduling, vaccine storage and handling, and vaccine recommendations.

What's New for Flu This Season?
Published September 2018

The Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices' (ACIP) 2018–19 influenza recommendations were published in Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report on August 24, 2018.

Changes for the 2018–19 season include:

  • Vaccine composition for this season (a change in the H3N2 and B [Victoria] components)
  • Recent FDA labeling changes, including expansion of the age indication for Afluria® Quadrivalent (Seqirus) to 5 years and older (previously licensed for people age 18 years and older), and Fluarix® Quadrivalent (GSK) to age 6 months and older (previously licensed for people age 3 years and older)
  • A recommendation that live attenuated influenza vaccine (LAIV, FluMist®; AstraZeneca) may be used when appropriate for age and health condition
  • A recommendation that people with a history of egg allergy of any severity may receive any recommended and age-appropriate influenza vaccine (inactivated influenza vaccine (IIV), recombinant influenza vaccine (RIV), or live attenuated influenza vaccine (LAIV)

The full guidance document, as well as a four-page summary and extensive background information, are available on CDC's Influenza ACIP Vaccine Recommendations webpage.

This season, three injectable inactivated influenza vaccines are available for children 6 through 35 months of age:

  • Fluzone® (Sanofi Pasteur)
  • FluLaval® (ID Biomedical)
  • Fluarix® (GlaxoSmithKline)

Clinicians need to be careful to avoid vaccine dosing errors with these vaccines. The dose for Fluzone® for children 6 through 35 months of age is 0.25 mL – half the dose recommended for people age 36 months and older. In contrast, the dose for FluLaval® and Fluarix® is 0.5 mL the same for people of all ages.

FluMist®, which is approved for healthy people age 2 through 49 years, also is the same dose for all ages.

For a list of all influenza vaccine products available in the United States this flu season, the Immunization Action Coalition (IAC) provides a one-page table titled "Influenza Vaccine Products for the 2018–2019 Influenza Season."

To access package inserts for all currently available influenza vaccines, visit IAC's Package Inserts web page.

The Vaccine Information Statements (VISs) for IIV and LAIV for the 2018–19 season are unchanged from the 2017–18 season (dated August 7, 2015). The VISs for both IIV and LAV in English and many other languages are available on IAC's VIS web section.

Updated standing order templates for influenza vaccine, screening checklists for contraindications and precautions, and many other helpful influenza-related educational materials and patient handouts are available from IAC in its Influenza Vaccine Handouts web section.


You can access the current and past issues of Technically Speaking in the following ways: from a box in the middle of the immunize.org home page, from the "Guide to immunize.org" at the bottom of every web page, or by going directly to the www.immunize.org/technically-speaking home page.

Related Link

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IAC Spotlight! IACís PowerPoint Slide Sets web page contains 13 presentations on a wide variety of immunization topics; available by request for your use 

IAC's PowerPoint Slide Sets web page on immunize.org contains presentations on a variety of immunization topics. Use the slides "as is" or modify them to suit your organization's needs. Currently there are 13 slide sets available in a 6-slide-per-page handout format. The titles and links to the handout-formatted slides are listed below.

To request any of the PowerPoint format slide sets, go to IAC's PowerPoint Slide Sets web page. Just below the presentation's title and description, click on "Request the PowerPoint slide set" and IAC will email the request form for the PowerPoint presentation. Once you have submitted your request, we will send you the presentation. You can edit and use it as you see fit.

Visit the IAC's PowerPoint Slide Sets web page on immunize.org to access and begin utilizing these valuable slide sets today!

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109 healthcare settings join IAC's Influenza Vaccination Honor Roll for mandatory healthcare worker vaccination, including People's Community Clinic, St. Catherine's Village, and 107 Essentia healthcare facilities

There are now 790 organizations enrolled in IAC's Influenza Vaccination Honor Roll. The honor roll recognizes hospitals, medical practices, professional organizations, health departments, and government entities that have taken a stand for patient safety by implementing mandatory influenza vaccination policies for healthcare personnel.

Since September 26, when IAC Express last reported on the Influenza Vaccination Honor Roll, 109 additional healthcare organizations have been enrolled, including People's Community Clinic in Austin, Texas, and St. Catherine's Village in Madison, Mississippi.

In addition, IAC enrolled 107 Essentia Health System facilities, including 80 medical and clinical practices, 16 hospitals, and 11 long-term care facilities. Essentia, a health system that operates in four states (Idaho, Minnesota, North Dakota and Wisconsin), implemented a system-wide mandatory influenza vaccination policy in September 2017. 

IAC urges qualifying healthcare organizations to apply.

Newly added hospitals and health systems

  • People's Community Clinic, Austin, TX 
  • St. Mary’s Hospital, Cottonwood, ID
  • Clearwater Valley Hospital, Orofino, ID
  • Essentia Health Ada, Ada, MN
  • Essentia Health Northern Pines, Aurora, MN
  • Essentia Health St. Joseph’s Medical Center, Brainerd, MN
  • Essentia Health Deer River, Deer River, MN
  • Essentia Health St. Mary’s Detroit Lakes, Detroit Lakes, MN
  • Essentia Health St. Mary’s Medical Center, Duluth, MN
  • Essentia Health Duluth, Duluth, MN
  • Essentia Health Holy Trinity Hospital, Graceville, MN
  • Essentia Health Sandstone, Sandstone, MN
  • Essentia Health Virginia, Virginia, MN
  • Essentia Health Institute of Rural Health, Duluth, MN
  • Essentia Health Fargo, Fargo, ND
  • Essentia Health Fosston, Fosston, ND
  • Essentia Health St. Mary’s Hospital Superior, Superior, WI

Newly added medical practices and pharmacies 

  • St. Mary’s Cottonwood Medical Clinic, Cottonwood, ID
  • St. Mary’s Craigmont Medical Clinic, Craigmont, ID
  • St. Mary’s Grangeville Clinic, Grangeville, ID
  • St. Mary’s Kamiah Medical Clinic, Kamiah, ID
  • Clearwater Valley Kooskia Medical Clinic, Kooskia, ID
  • St. Mary’s Nezperce Medical Clinic, Nezperce, ID
  • Clearwater Valley Orofino Health Center, Orofino, ID
  • Pioneer Medical Clinic, Pierce, ID
  • Essentia Health Ada Clinic, Ada, MN
  • Essentia Health Emergency Medical Services, Ada, MN
  • Essentia Health Ashland Clinic, Ashland, WI
  • Essentia Health Northern Pines Clinic, Aurora, MN
  • Essentia Health Babbitt Clinic, Babbitt, MN
  • Essentia Health Bagley Clinic, Bagley, MN
  • Essentia Health Baxter Specialty Clinic, Baxter, MN
  • Essentia Health Convenient Care, Baxter, MN
  • Essentia Health St. Joseph’s Baxter Clinic, Baxter, MN
  • Essentia Health St. Joseph’s Brainerd Clinic, Brainerd, MN
  • Essentia Health Convenient Care, Brainerd, MN
  • Essentia Health Chisholm Clinic, Chisholm, MN
  • Essentia Health St. Joseph’s Crosslake Clinic, Crosslake, MN
  • Essentia Health Deer River Clinic, Deer River, MN
  • Essentia Health Emergency Medical Services, Deer River, MN
  • Essentia Health St. Mary’s Detroit Lakes Clinic, Detroit Lakes, MN
  • Essentia Health 7 Day Clinic Detroit Lakes, Detroit Lakes, MN
  • Essentia Health St. Mary’s Emergency Medical Services, Detroit Lakes, MN
  • Essentia Health Duluth Clinic First Street Building, Duluth, MN
  • Essentia Health Duluth Clinic Second Street Building, Duluth, MN
  • Essentia Health Duluth Clinic Third Street Building, Duluth, MN
  • Essentia Health Lakeside Clinic, Duluth, MN
  • Essentia Health Lakewalk Clinic, Duluth, MN
  • Essentia Health West Duluth Clinic, Duluth, MN
  • Essentia Health Polinsky Medical Rehabilitation Center, Duluth, MN
  • Essentia Health Ely Clinic, Ely, MN
  • Essentia Health Emergency Medical Services, Fosston, MN
  • Essentia Health St. Joseph’s Emily Clinic, Emily, MN
  • Essentia Health St. Mary’s Frazee Clinic, Frazee, MN
  • Essentia Health Graceville Clinic, Graceville, MN
  • Essentia Health Grand Rapids Clinic, Grand Rapids, MN
  • Essentia Health Hackensack Clinic, Hackensack, MN
  • Essentia Health Hermantown Clinic, Hermantown, MN
  • Essentia Health Hibbing Clinic, Hibbing, MN
  • Essentia Health Sandstone Hinckley Therapy & Wellness Center, Hinckley, MN
  • Essentia Health International Falls Clinic, International Falls, MN
  • Essentia Health St. Mary’s Lake Park Clinic, Lake Park, MN
  • Essentia Health St. Mary’s Mahnomen Clinic, Mahnomen, MN
  • Essentia Health Menahga Clinic, Menahga, MN
  • Essentia Health Moorhead Clinic, Moorhead, MN
  • Essentia Health 7 Day Clinic Moorhead, Moorhead, MN
  • Essentia Health Oklee Clinic, Oklee, MN
  • Essentia Health Park Rapids Clinic, Park Rapids, MN
  • Essentia Health St. Mary’s Pelican Rapids Clinic, Pelican Rapids, MN
  • Essentia Health St. Joseph’s Pequot Lakes Clinic, Pequot Lakes, MN
  • Essentia Health St. Joseph’s Pierz Clinic, Pierz, MN
  • Essentia Health St. Joseph’s Pillager Clinic, Pillager, MN
  • Essentia Health St. Joseph’s Pine River Clinic, Pine River, MN
  • Essentia Health Proctor Clinic, Proctor, MN
  • Essentia Health Remer Clinic, Remer, MN
  • Essentia Health Emergency Medical Services, Sandstone, MN
  • Essentia Health Virginia Clinic, Virginia, MN
  • Essentia Health Virginia Medical Arts Clinic, Virginia, MN
  • Essentia Health Walker Clinic, Walker, MN
  • Essentia Health Casselton Clinic, Casselton, ND
  • Essentia Health 32nd Ave Clinic, Fargo, ND
  • Essentia Health South University Clinic, Fargo, ND
  • Essentia Health West Acres Clinic, Fargo, ND
  • Essentia Health 52nd Ave Clinic, Fargo, ND
  • Essentia Health West Fargo Clinic, Fargo, ND
  • Essentia Health 7 Day Clinic, North Fargo, Fargo, ND
  • Essentia Health 7 Day Clinic Osgood, Fargo, ND
  • Essentia Health Hankinson Clinic, Hankinson, ND
  • Essentia Health Jamestown Clinic, Jamestown, ND
  • Essentia Health Lisbon Clinic, Lisbon, ND
  • Essentia Health Valley City Clinic, Valley City, ND
  • Essentia Health Wahpeton Clinic, Wahpeton, ND
  • Essentia Health Ashland Clinic, Ashland, WI
  • Essentia Health Hayward Clinic, Hayward, WI
  • Essentia Health Spooner Clinic, Spooner, WI
  • Essentia Health St. Mary’s Superior Clinic, Superior, WI
  • Essentia Health Convenient Care Superior, Superior, WI

Newly added long-term care/assisted living facilities (LTCFs) 

  • St. Catherine's Village, Madison, MS
  • Essentia Health Northern Pines Care Center, Aurora, MN
  • Essentia Health Comstock Court, Deer River, MN
  • Essentia Health Homestead, Deer River, MN
  • Essentia Health Lincoln Park, Detroit Lakes, MN
  • Essentia Health Oak Crossing, Detroit Lakes, MN
  • Essentia Health Winchester, Detroit Lakes, MN
  • Essentia Health Living Center, Fosston, MN
  • Essentia Health Grace Home, Graceville, MN
  • Essentia Health Virginia Care Center, Virginia, MN
  • Grace Village, Graceville, MN
  • Prairie Pines Community, Fosston, MN

Related Links

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Voices for Vaccines releases new podcast episode titled "Measles Eradication and Elimination"

Voices for Vaccines (VFV) has posted a new entry in its Vax Talk podcast series: Measles Eradication and Elimination. In this podcast, CDC’s Dr. Mark Papania and Dr. Manisha Patel answer measles eradication and elimination questions. This episode was sponsored by the Task Force for Global Health in honor of Dr. Samuel Katz and Dr. Walter Orenstein, both of whom have played critical roles in eliminating measles.

If you or your organization would like information about how to become a sponsor of a VFV "Vax Talk" podcast, please contact VFV's executive director Karen Ernst, at info@voicesforvaccines.org.  

Voices for Vaccines is a national organization of parents and others who are dedicated to raising the level of the voices of immunization supporters. VFV invites everyone who values vaccines to become a member. Please spread the word to your friends and colleagues to join VFV!

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IAC HANDOUTS


“Practical Resources from the Immunization Action Coalition” is a descriptive 1-page handout about IAC resources; make copies and hand out at staff meetings or at state and local immunization conferences

IAC's ready-to-print handout, Practical Resources from the Immunization Action Coalition, is a descriptive 1-page piece about key IAC resources, including IAC Express, immunize.org, VISs, patient handouts and educational materials, and the vaccineinformation.org public website. Use this piece as a handout at immunization conferences or make copies for your healthcare setting staff.



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IAC updates its PowerPoint slide set "Quick Answers to Tough Questions"; use it "as is" or modify it to fit your needs

IAC recently posted a revised edition of its PowerPoint slide presentation for healthcare professionals titled Quick Answers to Tough Questions: Vaccine Talking Points for Healthcare Professionals. This slide set provides an outline of answers to questions about vaccine effectiveness and safety, and includes further reading suggestions for providers and helpful handouts for patients. You can download the 6-slide-per-page handout of 52 slides or request the slide set for your own use.

To request the PowerPoint file from IAC, go to IAC's PowerPoint Slide Sets web page. Just below the presentation's title and description, click on "Request the PowerPoint slide set" and IAC will email the request form for the PowerPoint presentation. Once you have submitted your request, we will send you the presentation. You can edit and use it as you see fit.

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IAC updates its parent handout "Keep your kids safe—get them vaccinated every fall or winter!" 

IAC recently updated Keep your kids safe—get them vaccinated every fall or winter. This handout for parents stresses the importance of influenza vaccination for children and the people around them and includes additional hints on staying well. Changes were made to include nasal spray flu vaccine as an available type of vaccine for the coming season. 

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VACCINE INFORMATION STATEMENTS


IAC posts eight new translations of the recently updated DTaP VIS  

IAC recently posted eight new translations of the DTaP VIS, which was updated on 8/24/18.

The Spanish translation was posted earlier. 

The Spanish-language rich text format (otherwise known as RTF) file for the updated DTaP VIS is available by going to http://www.immunize.org/vis/vis_dtap.asp. This format can be used with electronic medical records system such as GE Centricity or Epic. English VISs in RTF can be downloaded from CDC's website (click on any VIS to access all available formats).

IAC thanks Betül Polatdemir, MD, Lokman Hekim Hospital Group, and Ankara and Sibel Bostancıoğlu, MD, Ankara Occupational and Environmental Diseases Hospital, Ankara, Turkey, for the DTaP VIS translation in Turkish.

The remaining VIS translations were made available by IAC as part of a cooperative agreement with CDC.

Related Links

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OFFICIAL RELEASES AND ANNOUNCEMENTS


Weekly Epidemiological Record publishes recommendations for the composition of influenza vaccines for the southern hemisphere's 2019 flu season

WHO published Recommended composition of influenza virus vaccines for use in the 2019 southern hemisphere influenza season in the October 19 issue of its Weekly Epidemiological Record. A summary is reprinted below.

It is recommended that egg based quadrivalent vaccines for use in the 2019 southern hemisphere influenza season contain the following:

  • an A/Michigan/45/2015 (H1N1)pdm09-like virus;
  • an A/Switzerland/8060/2017 (H3N2)-like virus;
  • a B/Colorado/06/2017-like virus (B/Victoria/2/87 lineage); and
  • a B/Phuket/3073/2013-like virus (B/Yamagata/16/88 lineage).

It is recommended that egg based trivalent vaccines for use in the 2019 southern hemisphere influenza season contain the following:

  • an A/Michigan/45/2015 (H1N1)pdm09-like virus;
  • an A/Switzerland/8060/2017 (H3N2)-like virus; and
  • a B/Colorado/06/2017-like virus (B/Victoria/2/87 lineage).

It is recommended that the A(H3N2) component of non-egg based vaccines for use in the 2019 southern hemisphere influenza season be an A/Singapore/INFIMH-16-0019/2016-like virus together with the other vaccine components as indicated above. It is recommended that quadrivalent vaccines containing two influenza B viruses contain the above three viruses and a B/Brisbane/60/2008-like virus.

View the full report of recommendations. 

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FEATURED RESOURCES


CDC updates its Manual for the Surveillance of Vaccine-Preventable Diseases

CDC has recently updated several of its worksheets on mumps and pertussis in its Manual for the Surveillance of Vaccine-Preventable Diseases. CDC's description of this manual appears below.

The Manual for the Surveillance of Vaccine-Preventable Diseases provides current guidelines for those directly involved in surveillance of vaccine-preventable diseases (VPD), especially personnel at the local health departments. For each of the vaccine-preventable diseases, this manual includes a chapter describing the importance of rapid case identification; the importance of surveillance; disease reduction goals; case definitions (including clinical description and case classifications); epidemiologically important data to be collected during case investigation; activities for enhancing surveillance; activities for case investigation; and activities for outbreak control. Other chapters include information on surveillance indicators; surveillance data analyses; enhancing surveillance; laboratory support for surveillance; and reporting adverse events following vaccination. In addition, the manual includes a section reserved for insertion of state-specific guidance for VPD surveillance, as well as extensive appendices.
CDC requests that the pertussis death worksheet be completed for all known pertussis-related deaths that occurred during 2018. For inquiries, or to submit completed worksheets, please contact Amanda Faulkner at iqq2@cdc.gov. Worksheets may be sent to Amanda via encrypted e-mail or faxed to 404-315-4927.

Access the entire Manual for the Surveillance of Vaccine-Preventable Diseases on CDC's website.
              
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IAC's 142-page book, Vaccinating Adults: A Step-by-Step Guide, describes how to implement adult vaccination services in your healthcare setting and provides a review for staff who already vaccinate adults; IAC Guide available for free download

In late 2017, the Immunization Action Coalition (IAC) announced the publication of its new book, Vaccinating Adults: A Step-by-Step Guide (Guide).



This completely updated guide on adult immunization (originally published in 2004) provides easy-to-use, practical information covering important “how-to” activities to help providers enhance their existing adult immunization services or introduce them into any clinical setting, including:

  • setting up for vaccination services,
  • storing and handling vaccines,
  • deciding which people should receive which vaccines,
  • administering vaccines,
  • documenting vaccinations (including legal issues), and
  • understanding financial considerations and billing information.

In addition, the Guide is filled with hundreds of web addresses and references to help providers stay up to date on the latest immunization information, both now and in the future.

The entire Guide is available to download/print free of charge at www.immunize.org/guide. The downloaded version is suitable for double-sided printing. Options are available online to download the entire book or selected chapters. The development of the Guide was supported by the National Vaccine Program Office (NVPO) and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Expert staff from both agencies also provided early technical review of the content.

The Guide is a uniquely valuable resource to assist providers in increasing adult immunization rates. Be sure to get a copy today!

Related Links

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JOURNAL ARTICLES AND NEWSLETTERS


New population-level study determines HPV vaccine doesn’t encourage risky sexual behaviors among teen girls

The Canadian Medical Association Journal (CMAJ) published Population-level sexual behaviours in adolescent girls before and after introduction of the human papillomavirus vaccine (2003–2013) by Gina Ogilvie, et al. in its October 15 issue. The abstract is reprinted below.

Background: The human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine is delivered widely through school-based immunization programs. Some groups have expressed concern that HPV vaccination programs will result in an increase in sexual risk-taking behaviours among adolescents. We aimed to evaluate population-level changes in sexual behaviours before and after implementation of the school-based HPV vaccination program in British Columbia.

Methods: In 2008, a school-based HPV vaccination program for girls was introduced in British Columbia. Using data from the BC Adolescent Health Survey — a longitudinal provincial survey administered in schools to capture adolescent physical and emotional health indicators, we conducted a linear trend analysis on sexual health behaviours and risk factors in adolescent girls before and after the implementation of vaccination for HPV (2003, 2008 and 2013).

Results: We analyzed data for 298,265 girls who self-identified as heterosexual. The proportion of girls reporting ever having sexual intercourse decreased from 21.3% (2003) to 18.3% (2013; adjusted odds ratio [OR] 0.79). Self-report of sexual intercourse before the age of 14 years decreased significantly from 2008 to 2013 (adjusted OR 0.76), as did reported substance use before intercourse (adjusted OR for 2003–2013 0.69). There was no significant change in the number of sexual partners reported (2003–2013). Between 2003 and 2013, girls’ reported use of contraception and condoms increased, while pregnancy rates decreased.

Interpretation: Since the implementation of school-based HPV vaccination program in BC, sexual risk behaviours reported by adolescent girls either reduced or stayed the same. These findings contribute evidence against any association between HPV vaccination and risky sexual behaviours.


Access the full text: Population-level sexual behaviours in adolescent girls before and after introduction of the human papillomavirus vaccine (2003–2013) (PDF)

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About IAC Express
The Immunization Action Coalition welcomes redistribution of this issue of IAC Express or selected articles. When you do so, please add a note that the Immunization Action Coalition is the source of the material and provide a link to this issue.

If you have trouble receiving or displaying IAC Express messages, visit our online help section.

IAC Express is supported in part by Grant No. 6NH23IP922550 from the National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases, CDC. Its contents are solely the responsibility of IAC and do not necessarily represent the official views of CDC. IAC Express is also supported by educational grants from the following companies: AstraZeneca, Inc.; Merck Sharp & Dohme Corp.; Pfizer, Inc.; and Sanofi Pasteur.

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Vaccinating Adults:
A Step-by-Step Guide
Vaccinating Adults: A Step-by-Step Guide
New! IAC's 142-page book available for free download.
Calendar of Events
Conferences, meetings, and training opportunities
Conferences, meetings, and training opportunities
Patient Record Cards
Purchase IAC's patient record cards today!
Record cards for patients -- child & teen, adult, and lifetime -- are printed on durable paper and sized to fit in a wallet when folded
DVD Immunization Techniques
Purchase Immunization Techniques DVD
Every practice should have this award winning, "how-to" training video
Protect Newborns Guidebook
Protect Newborns Guidebook
Comprehensive guide Hepatitis B: What Hospitals Need to Do to Protect Newborns
Editorial Information
Editor:
Deborah L. Wexler, MD
Managing Editor:
Teresa Anderson, DDS, MPH

Consulting Editors:
Marian Deegan, JD
Courtnay Londo, MA
Jane Myers, MA, EdM  
Assistant Managing Editor:
Liv Augusta Anderson, MPP
Issue Abbreviations
AAFP: American Academy of Family Physicians
AAP: American Academy of Pediatrics
ACIP: Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices
CDC: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
FDA: Food and Drug Administration
IAC: Immunization Action Coalition
MMWR: Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report
NCIRD: National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases
VIS: Vaccine Information Statement
WHO: World Health Organization
 
 
- Guide to immunize.org -
A-Z INDEX
ABOUT IAC
ACIP RECOMMENDATIONS
ADDITIONAL RESOURCES
ADULT VACCINATION
ADULT VACCINATION GUIDE
ASK THE EXPERTS
Combination Vaccines
Diphtheria
Hepatitis A
Hepatitis B
Vaccine Storage and Handling
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BECKY PAYNE AWARD
BILLING & CODING
BIRTH DOSE GUIDEBOOK
CALENDAR OF EVENTS
CDC INFORMATION
CDC SCHEDULES
CLINIC TOOLS
Administering Vaccines
Adult Vaccination
Documenting Vaccination
Scheduling Vaccination
Screening for Contraindications
Storage & Handling
Vaccine Recommendations
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COALITIONS
CONTRIBUTE TO IAC
DEAR COLLEAGUE LETTER
HPV VACCINE
DEAR COLLEAGUE LETTER
MCV4 DOSE #2
DISEASES & VACCINES
Diphtheria
Hepatitis A
Hepatitis B
Influenza
Varicella
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DONATE TO IAC
EMAIL NEWS SERVICES
EDUCATIONAL MATERIALS
EXEMPTIONS
FAQs
FAVORITES (WEB SECTIONS)
FDA PRODUCT APPROVALS
GIVE BIRTH TO THE END OF
HEP B
HANDOUTS FOR PATIENTS &
STAFF
Administering Vaccines
Adult Vaccination
Documenting Vaccinations
Managing Vaccine Reactions
Parent Handouts
Patient Schedules
Questions & Answers
Recommendations
Screening Checklists
Standing Orders
Storage & Handling
Talking with Parents
Temperature Logs
Top Handouts
Translations
Vaccine Index
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HEPATITIS B BIRTH DOSE
HONOR ROLLS
HepB Birth Dose
Influenza Vaccination for HCP
IAC EARLY YEARS VIDEO
IAC EXPRESS
IMAGES
IMMUNIZATION TECHNIQUES
DVD
LAMINATED SCHEDULES
LAWS AND MANDATES
MANUFACTURERS
NATIONAL ADULT & INFLUENZA IMMUNIZATION SUMMIT
NEWS & INFORMATION
OFFICIAL RELEASES
ACIP
CDC
FDA
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PACKAGE INSERTS
PARTNERS
PAYNE AWARD
PHARMACISTS
PHOTOS
POWERPOINT SLIDE SETS
PRESS ROOM
PROTECT NEWBORNS
FROM HEP B
PUBLICATIONS
IAC Express
Vaccinating Adults:
   A Step-by-Step Guide
REGISTRIES
RESOURCE DIRECTORY
SHOP IAC
Immunization Techniques DVD
Laminated Schedules
Patient Record Cards
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SITE MAP
SLIDE SETS
STANDING ORDERS TEMPLATES
STATE INFORMATION
State Websites
State Laws
State Immunization Managers
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SUBSCRIBE
SUPPORT IAC
TECHNICALLY SPEAKING
TIMELINE FOR VACCINES
TRANSLATE FOR IAC
TRANSLATIONS OF VISs
TRAVEL (INTERNATIONAL)
UNPROTECTED PEOPLE REPORTS
Chickenpox
Diphtheria
Hepatitis A
Hepatitis B
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VACCINATING ADULTS: A STEP-BY-STEP GUIDE
VACCINE CONCERNS
Adjuvants & Ingredients
Alternative Medicine
Autism
Importance of Vaccination
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VACCINE INFORMATION STATEMENTS
Translations
Vaccine Index
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VACCINE MANUFACTURERS
VACCINE POLICY & LICENSURE
ACIP
FDA
WHO
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VACCINE SAFETY
VACCINE TIMELINE
VACCINES & DISEASES
VIDEO ABOUT IAC EARLY YEARS
VIDEOS (VIDEO OF THE WEEK)
WHAT'S NEW OR UPDATED AT IAC
Handouts
VISs and Translations
Web Sections
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Immunization Action Coalition  •  2550 University Avenue West  •  Suite 415 North  •  Saint Paul, Minnesota  •  55114
tel 651-647-9009  •  fax 651-647-9131
 
 
 
This website is supported in part by a cooperative agreement from the National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases (Grant No. 6NH23IP22550) at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in Atlanta, GA. The website content is the sole responsibility of IAC and does not necessarily represent the official views of CDC.