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Issue 1461
Issue 1461: November 20, 2019


TOP STORIES


IAC HANDOUTS


WORLD NEWS


FEATURED RESOURCES


JOURNAL ARTICLES AND NEWSLETTERS


EDUCATION AND TRAINING


CONFERENCES AND MEETINGS

 


TOP STORIES


National Influenza Vaccination Week, observed December 1–7, will highlight the importance of continuing flu vaccination through the holiday season and beyond

National Influenza Vaccination Week (NIVW) is an awareness week focused on highlighting the importance of influenza vaccination. NIVW will be observed this year on December 1–7. This is a great time to vaccinate your patients who have not yet been protected against flu and to remind your patients who have not been vaccinated to be sure they get protected. As a reminder, vaccination efforts should continue through the holiday season and beyond. Peak influenza activity does not generally occur until February. Providers are encouraged to continue vaccinating patients throughout the influenza season, including into the spring months as long as they have unvaccinated patients in their office.

This year CDC is focusing on groups at high risk of flu-related complications, hospitalizations, and death, such as children under 5 years, adults over 65, people with chronic conditions such as asthma, heart disease, and diabetes, and pregnant women. 

Click on the graphic below to access the NIVW campaign resources from CDC, including web tools, videos, communication hints, matte articles to submit to newspapers, animated graphics, and more. More will be added to the toolkit as NIVW gets closer.



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CDC updates its vaccine shortage web page information on hepatitis B vaccine supply 

In light of the current shortage of Recombivax HB pediatric hepatitis B vaccine (Merck) that will continue through mid-2020, CDC has updated its Current Vaccine Shortages and Delays web page. Note 2 of the footnotes, updated in September 2019, regarding the limited supply is reprinted below.

Pediatric hepatitis B vaccine: Merck anticipates having a limited supply of pediatric monovalent hepatitis B vaccine through mid 2020. GSK has confirmed its ability to continue to address supply gaps for pediatric hepatitis B vaccine during this period, using a combination of monovalent pediatric hepatitis B vaccine and its DTaP-HepB-IPV pediatric combination vaccine (Pediarix). The expected monovalent supply continues to provide sufficient vaccine to cover the hepatitis B birth dose for all children as well as additional pediatric hepatitis B vaccine for second and third doses. However, some adjustments will be needed from providers because of the decrease in monovalent vaccine (see attached guidance in the table above). To ensure an equitable distribution of monovalent hepatitis B vaccine and direct vaccine doses according to CDC’s clinical guidance, CDC continues to implement controlled vaccine ordering in the public sector using both Merck’s and GSK’s monovalent pediatric hepatitis B vaccines. In addition, GSK is providing monovalent doses to the private sector market directly and through their channels consistent with CDC’s clinical guidance. GSK’s DTaP-HepB-IPV pediatric combination vaccine (Pediarix) continues to be available in both the public and private sectors. Updated 2019...

Access CDC's Pediatric Hepatitis B Vaccination Guidance during the Supply Shortage, which is linked on this web page.

CDC also updated supply information regarding adult hepatitis B vaccine:

Adult hepatitis B vaccine: With the exception of a limited release of vaccine available in the fall of 2019, Merck does not expect to be distributing adult hepatitis B vaccine or dialysis formulation during the remainder of 2019 or during 2020. Dynavax and GSK have sufficient supplies of adult hepatitis B vaccines to address the anticipated gap in Merck’s supply of adult hepatitis B vaccine during this period; however, preference for a specific presentation (i.e., vial versus syringe) may not be met uniformly during this time. Updated Sep 2019

Timely series completion is key to the success of any vaccination program and critical to ensuring patients receive the full benefit of their vaccinations.

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Germany mandates measles vaccine for all schoolchildren, with high fines possible for parents who don't comply

The New York Times reported that Germany passed a law on November 14 that will take effect in March 2020 requiring all children seeking placement in a preschool for the following year to be immunized against measles. Children 6 and older will be required to show proof of having been vaccinated against measles by July 31, 2021. Parents who do not comply with the law could face a fine of several thousand euros. Adults working with children in public institutions will also need to show proof of vaccination. The only exemptions to this law will be medical exemptions granted by doctors.

The German health ministry posted a statement and detailed information about the new law, the Measles Protection Act, on its national health ministry website, Bundesministerium für Gesundheit. The page can be viewed in English translation in some browsers by clicking on "English version" at the top right of the page.

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IAC Spotlight! Visit IAC’s “Frequently Asked Questions” web page on immunize.org to find answers to your questions about IAC, its website, educational materials, and easy-to-use resources for healthcare professionals and the public

If you have ever wanted to know more about the Immunization Action Coalition, its website, or the resources IAC offers, the Frequently Asked Questions web page on immunize.org is a good place to look. Here are just a few of the questions that you will find answers to on this page:

  • What kind of an organization is the Immunization Action Coalition?
  • What does IAC's website offer healthcare professionals?
  • Your website is great, but it's so big! How can I find what I'm looking for?
  • How do I get permission to use one of the IAC handouts in our clinic/on our website? Can we make changes?
  • Where can I get educational videos to show to parents?

Visit IAC's Frequently Asked Questions web page to answer your questions about IAC and learn more about what it can offer for your practice and your patients.

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Reminder! “Dear Colleague” call-to-action letter from AAFP, AAP, ACHA, ACOG, APhA, SAHM, and IAC stresses implementation of immunization visit at 16 years of age

On August 1, IAC and six professional societies published a "Dear Colleague" letter titled 16-Year-Old Patients: Make Sure They Receive Their Annual Well Visit and Vaccinations. Click on the image below to read the letter.



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IAC's elegantly designed "Vaccines Save Lives" black enamel pins make great gifts for the holidays!

IAC has just designed an elegant new “Vaccines Save Lives” pin on hard black enamel with gold lettering and edges. 



The pin is a stick-through-post variety with the back end covered by a round rubber cap that holds the pin securely. A gold metal spring-lock clasp is also provided. The pin makes a refined statement, measuring 1.125" x 0.75". 

Wear these pins on clothing, uniforms, lab coats, tote bags, and backpacks to show that you value vaccines!



Click here for "Vaccines Save Lives" pins pricing and ordering information.

Visit Shop IAC for additional items, including "FLU VACCINE" buttons and stickers, patient record cards, and a vaccine administration training video.

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Flu season is here, so make sure you have IAC's new "FLU VACCINE" buttons for staff and patient stickers on hand!

IAC's new “FLU VACCINE” buttons and stickers are ready to ship! Their bright red color helps broadcast your important message about the need for flu vaccination. And the cost is nominal.



“FLU VACCINE” BUTTONS

The button measures 1.25" across and carries a bold message! Pin on lab coats, uniforms, other clothing, tote bags, or backpacks to show support for flu vaccine.
 
Buttons are delivered in bags of 10 buttons per bag.

Click here for pricing and ordering information for "FLU VACCINE" buttons.

“FLU VACCINE” STICKERS
 
Measuring 1.5" across and printed on Avery labels, theses stickers adhere well to clothing and have an easy-peel-off back.
 
Stickers are delivered to you cut individually (not on rolls)—available in bundles of 100. 

Click here for pricing and ordering information for “FLU VACCINE” stickers.

Visit Shop IAC for additional items, including "Vaccines Save Lives" enamel pins, patient record cards, and a vaccine administration training video.

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IAC HANDOUTS


IAC posts seven updated translations of its schedule for patients titled “Vaccinations for Pregnant Women”

IAC recently posted Arabic, Chinese–Simplified, French, Korean, Russian, Spanish, and Vietnamese translations of its recently updated Vaccinations for Pregnant Women patient handout. Access the new translated versions below.

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IAC and SAHM's patient handout for teens “You’re 16…We Recommend These Vaccines for You!” now offered in Spanish 

IAC and Society for Adolescent Health and Medicine's (SAHM) colorful, easy-to-understand handout for teens titled You’re 16…We Recommend These Vaccines for You! is now available in Spanish. 

Access the new Spanish-language version: Si tienes 16 años...¡Te recomendamos estas vacunas!



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WORLD NEWS


CDC and WHO report on progress towards polio eradication in Pakistan in this week's MMWR and Weekly Epidemiological Record, respectively

CDC published Progress toward Poliomyelitis Eradication—Pakistan, January 2018–September 2019 in the November 15 issue of MMWR (pages 1029–1033). On the same day, WHO's Weekly Epidemiological Record published a similar article titled Progress towards Poliomyelitis Eradication—Pakistan, January 2018–September 2019. A media summary of the MMWR article is reprinted below.

In under-immunized populations, strains of poliovirus in oral poliovirus vaccine (OPV) can circulate and mutate to behave like wild poliovirus, leading to outbreaks of paralytic poliomyelitis. During January 2018–June 2019, the number of circulating vaccine-derived poliovirus (cVDPV) outbreaks increased from nine to 29 during January 2017–June 2018. Of these, 86% were caused by cVDPV type 2 that occurred both inside and outside monovalent type 2 OPV outbreak response areas. Global OPV immunization after April 2016 only contained types 1 and 3 strains.

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FEATURED RESOURCES


Women in Government, representing the nation’s women state legislators, releases new podcast titled “Don’t Hesitate, Vaccinate”; IAC’s Dr. Deborah Wexler among featured speakers

Women in Government, a national, non-profit, non-partisan organization of women state legislators, has released a new podcast titled Don’t Hesitate, Vaccinate! The podcast, moderated by Patti Bellock, who has served in the Illinois legislature, features the following panelists: Georgia state senator Gloria Butler; Dr. Deborah Wexler of IAC; Elaine O'Hara of Sanofi Pasteur; and Erica DeWald of Vaccinate Your Family.



Access the podcast as well as web links to leading immunization advocacy and resource websites and organizations on the Women in Government's Immunizations/Vaccinations web page.

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Influenza season has begun; check out these resources and make sure all your patients are getting vaccinated!

Influenza season has now begun. Nationally, flu activity is increasing. For the week ending November 9, the geographic spread of influenza was reported as widespread in 3 states, with regional activity in 7 states. Puerto Rico and 20 states reported local activity; the District of Columbia, the U.S. Virgin Islands, and 19 states reported sporadic activity; 1 state reported no activity; and Guam did not report. 

Two influenza-associated pediatric deaths have been reported for the 2019–20 season. No new influenza-related pediatric deaths were reported during the week ending November 9. 

Visit the CDC’s Weekly U.S. Influenza Surveillance Report, FluView, for details.

Influenza vaccination is recommended for everyone 6 months of age and older, so please continue to vaccinate all your patients. If you don't provide influenza vaccination in your clinic, please recommend vaccination to your patients and refer them to a clinic or pharmacy that provides vaccines. The HealthMap Vaccine Finder can help patients locate influenza vaccination services near them.

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IAC's comprehensive Vaccinating Adults: A Step-by-Step Guide is available for free download either by chapter or in its entirety (142 pages)

In late 2017, the Immunization Action Coalition (IAC) announced the publication of its new book, Vaccinating Adults: A Step-by-Step Guide (Guide).



This completely updated "how to" guide on adult immunization provides easy-to-use, practical information covering essential adult immunization activities. It helps vaccine providers enhance their existing adult immunization services or introduce them into any clinical setting. Topics include:

  • setting up for vaccination services,
  • storing and handling vaccines,
  • deciding which people should receive which vaccines,
  • administering vaccines,
  • documenting vaccinations (including legal issues), and
  • understanding financial considerations and billing information.

In addition, the Guide is filled with hundreds of web addresses and references to help providers stay up to date on the latest immunization information, both now and in the future.

The Guide is available to download/print either by chapter or in its entirety free of charge at www.immunize.org/guide. The downloaded version is suitable for double-sided printing. The National Vaccine Program Office and CDC both supported the development of the Guide and provided early technical review.

The Guide is a uniquely valuable resource to assist providers in increasing adult immunization rates. Be sure to get a copy today!

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JOURNAL ARTICLES AND NEWSLETTERS


November issue of AAP Immunization Initiatives Newsletter now available online

The November issue of the AAP Immunization Initiatives Newsletter, published by the Academy of Pediatrics, is now available. The newsletter provides information concerning updates and alerts, events, research, links to AAP resources, and other resources for healthcare professionals. This month's issue features a special section titled "Why AAP Recommends Initiating HPV Vaccination as early as Age 9."

Access the complete November issue. To subscribe, send an email to immunize@aap.org, with the word "newsletter" in the "subject" field.

Related Link

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Pediatrics publishes study on primary care physicians’ HPV vaccine delivery practices, including their attitude regarding new 2-dose vaccine schedule

The journal Pediatrics has published HPV Vaccine Delivery Practices by Primary Care Physicians, by A. Kempe, et al., in its October 2019 issue. The Conclusions section of the abstract is reprinted below.

CONCLUSIONS: Although most physicians strongly recommend the HPV vaccine to 11- to 12-year-old patients, our data reveal areas for improvement in recommendation and delivery methods. Most physicians perceive that the 2-dose schedule is resulting in higher HPV completion rates.

Access the complete abstract.

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CDC publishes “Update on Vaccine-Derived Poliovirus Outbreaks—Worldwide, January 2018–June 2019” in this week’s MMWR 

CDC published Update on Vaccine-Derived Poliovirus Outbreaks—Worldwide, January 2018–June 2019 in the November 15 issue of MMWR (pages 1024–1028).

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EDUCATION AND TRAINING


Reminder: Vaccine Education Center to offer Current Issues in Vaccines webinar on Tdap, influenza, and dengue vaccines on December 11

The Vaccine Education Center (VEC) at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, together with the Pennsylvania chapter of the American Academy of Pediatrics, will present a one-hour webinar, beginning at 12:00 p.m. (ET) on December 11. Part of its Current Issues in Vaccines series, the webinar will feature Paul Offit, MD, director of VEC. Dr. Offit's topics for this webinar will be:
  • Tdap vaccine: Updates on safety
  • Influenza vaccine: Latest surveillance and effectiveness data
  • Dengue vaccine: Where things stand

Free continuing education credits (CME, CEU, and CPE) will be available for both the live and archived events. 

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New 6-module video CME/CE training titled “Closing Gaps in HPV Vaccination and Eliminating HPV-Related Cancers” available online

PRIME, an organization devoted to the science of learning and behavior change in health care, has recently released a 6-module video CME/CE training titled Closing Gaps in HPV Vaccination and Eliminating HPV-Related Cancers. In these videos, which feature short patient simulations in HPV vaccination, HPV experts share insights on HPV infection, HPV-related cancers, and the role of HPV vaccination in preventing cancer.

Access the training as well as information about obtaining CE credit.

Related Link

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NACCHO to host December 9 webinar on New York's Rockland County Health Department's response to the measles outbreak 

NACCHO is hosting a webinar titled Measles in Rockland County, NY—The Local Health Department’s Outbreak Response on December 9 from 1:00–2:30 p.m. (ET). The presenter will be Rockland County's Commissioner of Health, Dr. Patricia Schnabel Rubbert. The webinar's objectives are that participants who have viewed the webinar will be able to do the following: 

  • Characterize the impact of the measles outbreak on the Rockland County community
  • Explain strategies employed by the local health department to contain the measles outbreak
  • Describe legislative and policy challenges and newly implemented changes
  • Summarize lessons learned from the collaborative outbreak investigation process

Register for the webinar.

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CONFERENCES AND MEETINGS

Reminder: Abstracts for the 49th National Immunization Conference accepted through December 16

CDC will be accepting abstract submissions through December 16 for the 49th National Immunization Conference (NIC) to be held May 19–21 in Atlanta, Georgia. The NIC brings together more than 1,500 local, state, federal, and private-sector immunization stakeholders and partners to explore science, policy, education, and planning issues related to immunization and vaccine-preventable diseases.

Access the conference's abstract submission site for details on the conference themes and for instructions on submitting an abstract.

Visit the National Immunization Conference web page for more information about conference and hotel registration, fees, and more.

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NFID inviting abstracts by December 18 for presentations at 2020 Annual Conference on Vaccinology Research, March 23–25 in Washington, D.C.

The National Foundation for Infectious Diseases (NFID) is inviting abstracts for its 2020 Annual Conference on Vaccinology Research (ACVR), which will be held on March 23–25 in Washington, D.C. The deadline for submitting an abstract is December 18, 2019. Access additional information on the 2020 Annual Conference on Vaccinology Research (ACVR) Submit an Abstract web page.

Visit the ACVR web page for information about conference and hotel registration, presentations, and more.

Related Links

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About IAC Express
The Immunization Action Coalition welcomes redistribution of this issue of IAC Express or selected articles. When you do so, please add a note that the Immunization Action Coalition is the source of the material and provide a link to this issue.

If you have trouble receiving or displaying IAC Express messages, visit our online help section.

IAC Express is supported in part by Grant No. 6NH23IP922550 from the National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases, CDC. Its contents are solely the responsibility of IAC and do not necessarily represent the official views of CDC. IAC Express is also supported by educational grants from the following companies: AstraZeneca, Inc.; Merck Sharp & Dohme Corp.; Pfizer, Inc.; and Sanofi Pasteur.

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Video of the Week
Sura's Story: In 1995, Sura and her 21-year-old brother, Ali, were living in Syria, both attending medical school. During this time, Sura's brother cut his finger while suturing a patient, and three months later he developed fulminant hepatitis B virus infection. He died just one week later. Sura says everyone should get vaccinated so no one has to go through what happened to her family. (Source: Hepatitis B Foundation)
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Editor:
Deborah L. Wexler, MD
Managing Editor:
Teresa Anderson, DDS, MPH

Consulting Editors:
Marian Deegan, JD
Courtnay Londo, MA
Jane Myers, MA, EdM  
Assistant Managing Editor:
Liv Augusta Anderson, MPP
Issue Abbreviations
AAFP: American Academy of Family Physicians
AAP: American Academy of Pediatrics
ACIP: Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices
CDC: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
FDA: Food and Drug Administration
IAC: Immunization Action Coalition
MMWR: Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report
NCIRD: National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases
VIS: Vaccine Information Statement
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This website is supported in part by a cooperative agreement from the National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases (Grant No. 1NH23IP922654) at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in Atlanta, GA. The website content is the sole responsibility of IAC and does not necessarily represent the official views of CDC.