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Immunization Action Coalition
IAC Express 2009
Issue number 799: May 18, 2009
Please click here to subscribe to IAC Express as well as other FREE IAC periodicals.
Contents of this Issue
Select a title to jump to the article.
  1. CDC downgrades Travel Health Warning regarding travel to Mexico to a Travel Health Precaution
  2. CDC develops new H1N1 influenza educational resources
  3. Tomorrow is World Hepatitis Day!
  4. MMWR Notice to Readers recognizes hepatitis month and day
  5. MMWR Notice to Readers announces new hepatitis B initiative
  6. IAC's Video of the Week answers questions about the number, safety, and timing of childhood vaccines
  7. Re-translations of IAC's "Screening Questionnaire for Adult Immunization" and "Vaccinations for Adults--You're NEVER too old to get immunized!" available in seven languages
  8. IAC updates its professional-education piece "Pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine (PPSV): CDC answers your questions"
  9. The Vaccine Education Center offers a new resource on aluminum in vaccines
  10. May 15 issue of MMWR includes article about H1N1 influenza previously published as a MMWR Dispatch
  11. Date for ACIP meeting changed to June 24-26
  12. Summary Report from the February 2009 ACIP meeting now online
  13. MMWR publishes report on pediatric bacterial meningitis surveillance in Africa
 
Abbreviations
AAFP, American Academy of Family Physicians; AAP, American Academy of Pediatrics; ACIP, Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices; AMA, American Medical Association; CDC, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention; FDA, Food and Drug Administration; IAC, Immunization Action Coalition; MMWR, Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report; NCIRD, National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases; NIVS, National Influenza Vaccine Summit; VIS, Vaccine Information Statement; VPD, vaccine-preventable disease; WHO, World Health Organization.
  
Issue 799: May 18, 2009
1.  CDC downgrades Travel Health Warning regarding travel to Mexico to a Travel Health Precaution

On May 15, CDC issued a Travel Health Precaution titled "CDC Travel Health Warning for Novel H1N1 Flu in Mexico Removed." The introductory sentence and first two sections follow.


CDC's Travel Health Warning recommending against non-essential travel to Mexico, in effect since April 27, 2009, has now been downgraded to a Travel Health Precaution for Mexico.

Current Situation
CDC has been monitoring the ongoing outbreak of novel H1N1 flu in Mexico and, with the assistance of the Mexican authorities, has obtained a more complete picture of the outbreak. There is evidence that the Mexican outbreak is slowing down in many cities though not all. In addition, the United States and other countries are now seeing increasing numbers of cases not associated with travel to Mexico. Finally, the risk of severe disease from novel H1N1 virus infection now appears to be less than originally thought.

CDC Recommendations
At this time, CDC has removed its recommendation that U.S. travelers avoid travel to Mexico.

CDC continues to recommend that travelers visiting Mexico take steps to protect themselves from getting novel H1N1 flu.

CDC recommends that travelers at high risk for complications from any form of influenza discuss with their physicians the risks and benefits of travel in the context of their planned itinerary to Mexico, and may want to consider postponing travel. Travelers at high risk for complications include:
  • Children less than 5 years old
  • Persons aged 65 years or older
  • Children and adolescents (less than 18 years) who are receiving long-term aspirin therapy and who might be at risk for experiencing Reye syndrome after influenza virus infection
  • Pregnant women
  • Adults and children who have chronic pulmonary, cardiovascular, hepatic, hematological, neurologic, neuromuscular, or metabolic disorders
  • Adults and children who have immunosuppression (including immunosuppression caused by medications or by HIV)
  • Residents of nursing homes and other chronic-care facilities

To read the entire document, which includes information on preparing for a trip, what to do if a person gets sick during travel, and more, go to:
http://wwwn.cdc.gov/travel/content/travel-health-precaution/novel-h1n1-flu-mexico.aspx

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2 CDC develops new H1N1 influenza educational resources

CDC has created several new tools that may be useful to clinicians and public health officials during the H1N1 influenza epidemic.

(1) CDC and HHS are working together to provide social media tools to encourage sharing, collaboration, and interactivity during the current novel H1N1 influenza outbreak. Widgets, mobile information, online videos, and the like reinforce and personalize messages, reach new audiences, and build a  communication infrastructure based on open information exchange. To access these new tools, go to: http://www.cdc.gov/socialmedia/h1n1

(2) CDC offers resources for employers--including guidance documents and a PowerPoint presentation--to provide general H1N1 influenza information to employees, constituents, and other partners at http://www.cdc.gov/h1n1flu/business

(3) CDC has developed an audio public service announcement to provide information and guidance for recent fraudulent activity surrounding ads for influenza remedies. Visit http://www.cdc.gov/h1n1flu/psa/consumerfraud.htm to listen to the announcement. Please share this link with others.

Remember, the home page of CDC's H1N1 Flu web section can be accessed from http://www.cdc.gov/h1n1flu

Interim guidance documents from CDC can be accessed directly from http://www.cdc.gov/H1N1flu/guidance

IAC has gathered important information related to H1N1 influenza in a new web section to make it easier to keep up to date with developments. To access this resource, go to:
http://www.immunize.org/h1n1

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3 Tomorrow is World Hepatitis Day!

May 19 is the second World Hepatitis Day. Intended to increase global awareness of the prevalence of and seriousness of viral hepatitis disease, World Hepatitis Day is being coordinated by the World Hepatitis Alliance, a non-governmental organization that represents almost 200 hepatitis B and hepatitis C patient groups from around the world. The World Hepatitis Alliance is a global voice for the 500 million people worldwide living with chronic viral hepatitis B (HBV) or chronic viral hepatitis C (HCV).

The global campaign's theme is "Am I Number 12?" This concept was designed not only to communicate the incredible statistic that one in 12 people worldwide has HBV or HCV, but also to encourage people to question themselves and get tested. This inclusive theme is intended to combat the stigma often associated with hepatitis B and C by highlighting the extent of hepatitis viral infection across the world in a memorable way.

For information on the global campaign, go to:
http://www.worldhepatitisday.org

For information on planning efforts in the U.S., visit the National Viral Hepatitis Roundtable at
http://www.nvhr.org/WHD-2009.htm

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4 MMWR Notice to Readers recognizes hepatitis month and day

CDC published "National Hepatitis Awareness Month and World Hepatitis Day--May 19, 2009" as a Notice to Readers in the May 15 issue of MMWR. The article follows in its entirety.


May is National Hepatitis Awareness Month in the United States, and May 19 is World Hepatitis Day. Both events draw attention to the large but often underrecognized burden of disease and death associated with viral hepatitis and the importance of prevention and early detection. An estimated 4.5 million persons in the United States are living with chronic hepatitis B (HBV) or hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection, which together represent the major cause of chronic liver disease and liver cancer. In 2006, chronic viral hepatitis contributed to at least 15,000 deaths in the United States. Globally, hepatitis B and C also are health threats, killing approximately 1.5 million persons per year.

A comprehensive public heath approach comprising interventions to protect vulnerable populations from infection (e.g., vaccination and adoption of safe injection procedures) and timely screening and care for chronic HBV and HCV infection can reduce the health burden of viral hepatitis. Additional information about viral hepatitis is available at http://www.cdc.gov/hepatitis Information about World Hepatitis Day activities is available at http://www.nvhr.org/WHD-2009.htm


To access a web-text (HTML) version of the complete article, go to: http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/mm5818a5.htm

To access a ready-to-print (PDF) version of this issue of MMWR, go to: http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/PDF/wk/mm5818.pdf

To receive a FREE electronic subscription to MMWR (which includes new ACIP recommendations), go to:
http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/mmwrsubscribe.html

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5 MMWR Notice to Readers announces new hepatitis B initiative

CDC published "National Hepatitis B Initiative for Asian Americans/Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islanders" as a Notice to Readers in the May 15 issue of MMWR. The article follows in its entirety, excluding one reference.


CDC and the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, along with members of the National Task Force on Hepatitis B Expert Panel, have created a strategic plan, Goals and Strategies to Address Chronic Hepatitis B in Asian Americans/Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander Populations, which addresses the disproportionate impact of chronic hepatitis B in these minority communities.

An estimated 1.4 million persons in the United States are living with chronic hepatitis B, and more than half are Asian Americans and Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islanders. These populations have the highest rates of chronic hepatitis B among all racial/ethnic groups in the United States and also a disproportionately high risk for liver cancer. The HBV infection-related death rate among Asian Americans and Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islanders is seven times greater than the rate among whites.

The strategic plan outlines the health education, screenings, care, and research needed to reduce and eventually eliminate chronic hepatitis B among Asian Americans and Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islanders. Additional information is available at http://www.omhrc.gov/templates/browse.aspx?lvl=2&lvlid=190


To access a web-text (HTML) version of the complete article, go to: http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/mm5818a6.htm

To access a ready-to-print (PDF) version of this issue of MMWR, go to: http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/PDF/wk/mm5818.pdf

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6 IAC's Video of the Week answers questions about the number, safety, and timing of childhood vaccines

IAC encourages IAC Express readers to watch a 14-minute video featuring Heidi Murkoff, the author of the popular What to Expect When You're Expecting prenatal and parenting books, and Dr. Jay M. Lieberman, pediatrician and professor of pediatrics, University of California School of Medicine, Irvine. Intended for the general public, the video answers questions about the number, safety, and timing of childhood vaccinations.

The video will be available on the home page of IAC's website through May 24. To access it, go to: http://www.immunize.org and click on the image under the words Video of the Week, which you'll find toward the top of the page. It may take a few moments for the video to begin playing; please be patient!

Remember to bookmark IAC's home page to view a new video every Monday. While you're at our home page, we encourage you to browse around--you're sure to find resources and information that will enhance your practice's immunization delivery.

All the videos featured as an IAC Video of the Week have recently been archived in a new section of IAC's website. To view any of the videos previously featured, go to:
http://www.immunize.org/votw/apr09.asp

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7 Re-translations of IAC's "Screening Questionnaire for Adult Immunization" and "Vaccinations for Adults--You're NEVER too old to get immunized!" available in seven languages

IAC recently had two of its popular print pieces re-translated to match the changes made to the English versions in April. The updated versions of "Screening Questionnaire for Adult Immunization" and "Vaccinations for Adults--You're NEVER too old to get immunized!" are now available in Spanish, Arabic, Chinese, French, Korean, Russian, and Vietnamese.

To access the Spanish translation of "Screening Questionnaire for Adult Immunization," go to:
http://www.immunize.org/catg.d/p4065-01.pdf

To access the Arabic translation of "Screening Questionnaire for Adult Immunization," go to:
http://www.immunize.org/catg.d/p4065-20.pdf

To access the Chinese translation of "Screening Questionnaire for Adult Immunization," go to:
http://www.immunize.org/catg.d/p4065-08.pdf

To access the French translation of "Screening Questionnaire for Adult Immunization," go to:
http://www.immunize.org/catg.d/p4065-10.pdf

To access the Korean translation of "Screening Questionnaire for Adult Immunization," go to:
http://www.immunize.org/catg.d/p4065-09.pdf

To access the Russian translation of "Screening Questionnaire for Adult Immunization," go to:
http://www.immunize.org/catg.d/p4065-07.pdf

To access the Vietnamese translation of "Screening Questionnaire for Adult Immunization," go to:
http://www.immunize.org/catg.d/p4065-05.pdf

To access the English version of "Screening Questionnaire for Adult Immunization," go to:
http://www.immunize.org/catg.d/p4065.pdf

To access the Spanish translation of "Vaccination for Adults--You're NEVER too old to get immunized," go to: http://www.immunize.org/catg.d/p4030-01.pdf

To access the Arabic translation of "Vaccination for Adults--You're NEVER too old to get immunized," go to: http://www.immunize.org/catg.d/p4030-20.pdf

To access the Chinese translation of "Vaccination for Adults--You're NEVER too old to get immunized," go to: http://www.immunize.org/catg.d/p4030-08.pdf

To access the French translation of "Vaccination for Adults--You're NEVER too old to get immunized," go to: http://www.immunize.org/catg.d/p4030-10.pdf

To access the Korean translation of "Vaccination for Adults--You're NEVER too old to get immunized," go to: http://www.immunize.org/catg.d/p4030-09.pdf

To access the Russian translation of "Vaccination for Adults--You're NEVER too old to get immunized," go to: http://www.immunize.org/catg.d/p4030-07.pdf

To access the Vietnamese translation of "Vaccination for Adults--You're NEVER too old to get immunized," go to: http://www.immunize.org/catg.d/p4030-05.pdf

To access the English version of "Vaccination for Adults--You're NEVER too old to get immunized," go to: http://www.immunize.org/catg.d/p4030.pdf

To access additional FREE, ready-to-print translations from the IAC website, go to:
http://www.immunize.org/printmaterials/translations.asp

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8 IAC updates its professional-education piece "Pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine (PPSV): CDC answers your questions"

 IAC recently made several changes to its print resource for healthcare professionals titled "Pneumococcal polysaccharidevaccine (PPSV): CDC answers your questions." Its content was updated to reflect recently issued ACIP provisional recommendations on PPSV use.

To access the revised "Pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine (PPSV): CDC answers your questions," go to: http://www.immunize.org/catg.d/p2015.pdf

IAC's Print Materials web section offers healthcare professionals and the public approximately 250 FREE English-language materials (many also available in translation), which we encourage website users to print out, copy, and distribute widely. To access all of IAC's free print materials, go to:
http://www.immunize.org/printmaterials

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9 The Vaccine Education Center offers a new resource on aluminum in vaccines

The Vaccine Education Center (VEC) at the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia recently developed a new education sheet, "Aluminum in Vaccines: What you should know." Intended for patients, parents, and providers, the sheet answers the most frequently asked questions about the use and safety of aluminum in vaccines. English- and Spanish-language versions are available.

Health professionals can order two 50-sheet pads in each language at no charge. Additional pads are available for $3, plus shipping.

To access a ready-to-copy (PDF) version of the sheet in English, click here.

To access a ready-to-copy (PDF) version of the sheet in Spanish, click here.

Order by completing the online form at https://www.chop.edu/vaccine/vec/profOrder.cfm#form or email vaccines@email.chop.edu or call (215) 590-9990.

For additional ordering information, go to:
http://www.chop.edu/consumer/jsp/division/generic.jsp?id=75982

View all VEC's quality education materials at
https://www.chop.edu/consumer/jsp/division/generic.jsp?id=81901

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10.  May 15 issue of MMWR includes article about H1N1 influenza previously published as a MMWR Dispatch

The May 15 issue of MMWR includes an article, "Novel Influenza A (H1N1) Virus Infections in Three Pregnant Women--United States, April–May 2009." It was previously published as a MMWR Dispatch on May 12 and was covered in the May 13 issue of IAC Express. The title and link to the MMWR article follow:

To access a web-text version of the article, go to:
http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/mm5818a3.htm

To access a ready-to-print (PDF) version of this issue of MMWR, go to: http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/PDF/wk/mm5818.pdf

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11.  Date for ACIP meeting changed to June 24-26

The Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) will hold its next meeting on June 24-26 at CDC's Clifton Road campus in Atlanta. Previously the meeting was scheduled for June 24-25. The meeting is open to the general public.

To attend the ACIP meeting at the Clifton Road campus, ACIP attendees (participants and visitors) must register online. June 5 is the online registration deadline for non-U.S. citizens. June 12 is the deadline for U.S. citizens.

To access the online registration form, go to:
http://www2a.cdc.gov/nip/ACIP/JuneRegistration.asp

To access detailed information about the meeting, go to: http://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/recs/acip/meetings.htm#register There you will find links to the meeting agenda, driving directions, and other useful material.

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12.  Summary Report from the February 2009 ACIP meeting now online

The CDC website recently posted the Summary Report of ACIP's February 25-26 meeting.

To access a ready-to-print (PDF) version of the report, go to:
http://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/recs/acip/downloads/min-feb09.pdf

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13.  MMWR publishes report on pediatric bacterial meningitis surveillance in Africa

CDC published "Pediatric Bacterial Meningitis Surveillance--African Region, 2002–2008" in the May 15 issue of MMWR. A portion of the summary made available to the press is reprinted below.


A surveillance network for three childhood killers in Africa is providing valuable data that informs vaccine introduction in hard-hit countries. Each year, 500,000 children in Africaare killed by bacterial meningitis and pneumonia caused by Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib), and Streptococcus pneumoniae. In addition, Neisseria meningitidis is responsible for recurring large-scale epidemics of bacterial meningitis. A sentinel surveillance system was established in 2001 in 26 countries in the region, which has been useful for decisions to use Hib vaccine in some countries. This network needs to be maintained and strengthened to inform decisions about vaccine introduction to prevent bacterial meningitis and pneumonia caused by S. pneumoniae and N. meningitidis, and to monitor the impact of vaccination.


To access a web-text (HTML) version of the complete article, go to: http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/mm5818a2.htm

To access a ready-to-print (PDF) version of this issue of MMWR, go to: http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/PDF/wk/mm5818.pdf

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This website is supported in part by a cooperative agreement from the National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases (Grant No. 5U38IP000290) at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in Atlanta, GA. The website content is the sole responsibility of IAC and does not necessarily represent the official views of CDC.