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Issue 1268
Issue 1268: October 5, 2016

Ask the Experts
Ask the Experts—Question of the Week: Mom comes in with her 19-month-old. She reports that her (the mother’s) sibling has…read more


TOP STORIES


VACCINE INFORMATION STATEMENTS


FEATURED RESOURCES


JOURNAL ARTICLES AND NEWSLETTERS


EDUCATION AND TRAINING


CONFERENCES AND MEETINGS



TOP STORIES


CDC reports on influenza vaccination coverage of healthcare professionals in 2015–2016

CDC published Influenza Vaccination Coverage Among Health Care Personnel—United States, 2015–16 Influenza Season in the September 30 issue of MMWR (pages 1026–31). A summary made available to the press is reprinted below.

The Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) recommends that all health-care personnel (HCP) be vaccinated annually against influenza. Vaccination of HCP can reduce influenza-related morbidity and mortality among HCP and their patients. Overall, 79.0% of HCP reported receiving an influenza vaccination in the 2015–16 season, similar to the 77.3% coverage among HCP reported in the 2014–15 season. Vaccination coverage continues to be higher among HCP working in hospitals (91.2%) and lower among HCP working in ambulatory (79.8%) and long-term care settings (69.2%); however, long-term care settings were the only setting in which coverage increased in 2015–16 compared with 2014–15 (an increase of 5.3 percentage points). Coverage continues to be highest among physicians (95.6%) and lowest among assistants and aides (64.1%), and highest among HCP who were required by their employer to be vaccinated (96.5%). Among HCP working in settings where vaccination was neither required, promoted, nor offered on site, vaccination coverage continues to be low (44.9%).

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Final 2015–16 influenza vaccination coverage estimates reported in MMWR

CDC published Announcement: Final 2015–16 Influenza Vaccination Coverage Estimates for Selected Local Areas, States, and the United States Available Online in the September 30 issue of MMWR (page 1041). An excerpt is reprinted below.

Final 2015–16 influenza season vaccination coverage estimates are available online at FluVaxView (http://www.cdc.gov/flu/fluvaxview/). The online information includes estimates of the cumulative percentage of persons vaccinated through the end of each month during July 2015–May 2016, for selected local areas, states, and regions as designated by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, and the United States overall.

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CDC reports on measles outbreak in Shelby County, Tennessee

CDC published Notes from the Field: Measles Outbreak of Unknown Source—Shelby County, Tennessee, April–May 2016 in the September 30 issue of MMWR (pages 1039–1040). Some excerpts from the article are reprinted below.

On April 15, 2016, local public health officials in Shelby County, Tennessee, were notified of a positive measles immunoglobulin M (IgM) test for a male aged 18 months (patient A). On April 18, 2016, a second positive measles IgM test was reported for a man aged 50 years (patient B). Both patients had rash onset on April 9, 2016. The Shelby County Health Department initiated an investigation, and confirmatory testing for measles virus on oropharyngeal swabs by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) at CDC was positive for both patients. On April 21, 2016, public health officials were notified of a third suspected measles case in a female aged 7 months (patient C) who had developed a rash on April 14; PCR testing was positive. Genotyping conducted at CDC identified genotype B3 measles virus in all three cases. Genotype B3 is known to be circulating globally and has previously been associated with imported cases in the United States...

This outbreak, with three epidemiologically distinct chains of transmission and no identified common source, highlights the importance of high 2-dose MMR vaccination coverage among vaccine-eligible persons and the need for ongoing, vigilant surveillance for measles virus in the United States. Clinical providers and public health officials should maintain a high index of suspicion for measles because delayed recognition and delayed reporting to public health officials can lead to a rapid propagation of cases and difficulty in tracking epidemiologic links during investigations. One patient in this outbreak was admitted to a tertiary care hospital for 72 hours, and although measles IgM testing was ordered, the patient was not placed in airborne isolation. The provider thought a measles diagnosis was unlikely because no documented measles cases had been reported in Shelby County for >10 years and vaccination rates in the area are generally high (approximately 90%).

As demonstrated in this outbreak, a lack of international travel and absence of recent measles cases in the community can provide false reassurance, and it is important that patients with clinically compatible illness and an uncertain vaccination history be evaluated for measles. This outbreak serves as a reminder that certain communities are susceptible to measles outbreaks; however, risks for these outbreaks can be mitigated through prompt identification of potential cases with early notification of public health officials to suspected cases, rapid public health response, and maintenance of high 2-dose MMR vaccination coverage in the community. In addition, all health care workers born during or after 1957 should receive 2 doses of MMR vaccine and ensure that their immunization records are easily accessible for confirmation.


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PAHO/WHO announces measles elimination in the Americas

The Pan American Health Organization (PAHO), the Regional Office for the Americas of the World Health Organization, announced the elimination of measles in the Americas. An excerpt from their press release, Region of the Americas is declared free of measles, is reprinted below.

The Region of the Americas is the first in the world to have eliminated measles, a viral disease that can cause severe health problems, including pneumonia, brain swelling and even death. This achievement culminates a 22-year effort involving mass vaccination against measles, mumps and rubella throughout the Americas.

The declaration of measles’ elimination was made by the International Expert Committee for Documenting and Verifying Measles, Rubella, and Congenital Rubella Syndrome Elimination in the Americas. The announcement came during the 55th Directing Council of the Pan American Health Organization/World Health Organization (PAHO/WHO), which is currently underway and is being attended by ministers of Health from throughout the Americas.


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NFID releases summary of September 29 news conference about influenza and pneumococcal disease

On September 29, the National Foundation for Infectious Diseases (NFID) hosted the 2016 Influenza/ Pneumococcal News Conference in collaboration with CDC and other leading medical and public health groups who rallied together to show their strong support for influenza immunization. The event served to communicate critical messages, including a call to action for everyone to get vaccinated. Two paragraphs from a related September 29 press release are reprinted below.

With influenza (flu) vaccine readily available and sufficient doses expected throughout the season, the National Foundation for Infectious Diseases (NFID), along with public health and medical organizations urge the public and healthcare professionals to follow the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommendation for everyone age six months and older to be vaccinated against influenza each year.

Influenza vaccination coverage across the entire U.S. population was 45.6 percent, down by 1.5 percentage points from the previous season. The largest coverage decreases were seen among older people with a drop of 3.4 percentage points to 43.6 percent among people 50 to 64 years old and a drop of 3.3 percentage points to 63.4 percent among people 65 years and older. The highest influenza vaccination coverage among the public during the 2015–2016 season was among children age 6 months through 23 months. At 75 percent, this is the only group of people that exceeds the national public health goals of 70 percent vaccination coverage. Coverage of 46 percent among the public means about 144 million people received a flu vaccine last season in the U.S.


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CDC’s “Parents Guide to Childhood Immunizations” wins a 2016 National Health Information Award

CDC's Parents' Guide to Childhood Immunizations won a 2016 National Health Information Award. The Parents' Guide helps parents and caregivers learn about the role vaccines play in helping keep children healthy. The color booklet includes a glossary and list of resources and is illustrated with children’s artwork.

The book is available to download in full or by chapter on the Parents' Guide to Childhood Immunizations web section. Information on ordering print editions is available on the site as well.

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Join the Hepatitis B Foundation as part of their Hepatitis B Storytelling Project

The Hepatitis B Storytelling Project is a project to make the real voices of everyday people living with or affected by Hepatitis B a key ingredient of the Hepatitis B Foundation's prevention and advocacy efforts. The Hepatitis B Foundation and the Association of Asian Pacific Community Health Organizations (AAPCHO) are partnering with StoryCenter to launch the project.

The Hepatitis B Foundation is committed to representing a diversity of people and perspectives with this project. They're looking for women and men age 18 or older who are willing to attend a four-day digital storytelling workshop, share a unique, personal story as a short video, and become a champion in their local communities to publicly share the collection of stories. To learn more about the project, or if interested in participating in the digital storytelling workshop, please visit the project website and complete the storyteller information packet.

Email Kate Moraras at the Hepatitis B Foundation with any questions.

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Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services adds reimbursement for hepatitis B screening

The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services recently issued its final decision regarding coverage of hepatitis B screening, titled Decision Memo for Screening for Hepatitis B Virus (HBV) Infection. An excerpt from the decision is printed below.

The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) has determined that the evidence is sufficient to conclude that screening for Hepatitis B Virus (HBV) infection, consistent with the grade A and B recommendations by the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF), is reasonable and necessary for the prevention or early detection of an illness or disability and is appropriate for individuals entitled to benefits under Part A or enrolled under Part B.

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VACCINE INFORMATION STATEMENTS


IAC posts nine translations of the Hepatitis B VIS

IAC recently posted the following translations of the Hepatitis B VIS, dated 7/20/2016:

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IAC posts nine translations of the Serogroup B Meningococcal (MenB) VIS

IAC recently posted the following translations of the Meningococcal (MenB) VIS, dated 8/9/2016:

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FEATURED RESOURCES


Adult Immunization Resource Guide now available online from Association of Immunization Managers

The Association of Immunization Managers (AIM) recently released its publication Adult Immunization Resource Guide. An excerpt from AIM's announcement of its release is reprinted below.

The Adult Immunization Resource Guide is meant to provide examples of programmatic activities and relevant resources for immunization programs to use to increase adult immunization rates in their jurisdiction. The Guide includes chapters on IIS, reaching adults where they live and work, engaging the public and providers, reaching special populations like those at high risk and pregnant women, as well as collaborations with pharmacists and reaching the uninsured. 

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CDC offers digital media toolkit for influenza season

CDC recently released its digital media toolkit for the 2016–17 influenza season. CDC relies heavily on its network of partner organizations to promote its messages and activate communities to get vaccinated. To assist in your efforts to help spread the word about the serious complications influenza can cause and the importance of vaccination, this guide provides details for events/activities, sample social media and newsletter content, website badges, and online resources.

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“Talking About Vaccines with Dr. Paul Offit” DVDs available for purchase through VEC

Talking About Vaccines with Dr. Paul Offit DVDs are available for purchase on the Vaccine Education Center (VEC) at the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia's website. This series of short videos features Dr. Paul Offit answering common questions about vaccines. The videos are available on DVDs in a looped format and are available for purchase by healthcare providers.

Practices and clinics looking for something educational (and interesting) to play in the waiting room should consider purchasing these DVDs. You can check out the videos on YouTube.

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JOURNAL ARTICLES AND NEWSLETTERS


Medical Assistants Resources and Training on Immunization (MARTi) releases newsletter on influenza

Medical Assistants Resources and Training on Immunization (MARTi) provides immunization-related information and links to training opportunities for medical assistants. MARTi just released a newsletter that focuses on the 2016–17 influenza season.

MARTi is funded through a cooperative agreement between CDC and the Association for Prevention Teaching and Research (APTR).

Visit the MARTi website at www.marti-us.org and be sure to recommend it to the medical assistants with whom you work.

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EDUCATION AND TRAINING


NFID to offer webinar, “Reducing the Burden of Pneumococcal Infection through Vaccination,” on October 11
The National Foundation for Infectious Diseases (NFID) will present a one-hour webinar at 12:00 p.m. (ET) on October 5. Titled Reducing the Burden of Pneumococcal Infection through Vaccination, the webinar will be moderated by William Schaffner, MD, medical director, NFID.

Registration (required) is open now.

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CONFERENCES AND MEETINGS


2017 Annual Conference on Vaccine Research to be held April 24–26 in Baltimore; abstract submission ends December 5
 
The National Foundation for Infectious Diseases (NFID) is hosting its Conference on Vaccine Research in Baltimore, MD, on April 24–26, 2017. Now in its 20th year, the Annual Conference on Vaccine Research (ACVR) provides high-quality, current reports of scientific progress and best practices featured in both invited presentations and submitted oral abstracts and posters.

Abstract submissions for oral or poster presentations at the 2017 Annual Conference on Vaccine Research will be accepted until 11:59 p.m. (ET), December 5, 2016.

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ASK THE EXPERTS

Question of the Week

Mom comes in with her 19-month-old. She reports that her (the mother’s) sibling has a history of a severe reaction to pertussis vaccine in the mid 1990s. Now mom is reluctant to give her child pertussis vaccine although the child received Pediarix (DTaP-HepB-IPV, GlaxoSmithKline) 2 months ago without incident. Should we be concerned about the mother’s family history of a severe reaction to pertussis vaccine?

A family history of a neurologic disorder or reaction to a pertussis-containing vaccine is not a contraindication to vaccination of this child. The child should receive additional DTaP doses as indicated in the catchup schedule.


About IAC's Question of the Week

Each week, IAC Express highlights a new, topical, or important-to-reiterate Q&A. This feature is a cooperative venture between IAC and CDC. William L. Atkinson, MD, MPH, IAC's associate director for immunization education, chooses a new Q&A to feature every week from a set of Q&As prepared by experts at CDC’s National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases.

We hope you enjoy this feature and find it helpful when dealing with difficult real-life scenarios in your vaccination practice. Please encourage your healthcare professional colleagues to sign up to receive IAC Express at www.immunize.org/subscribe.

If you have a question for the CDC immunization experts, you can email them directly at nipinfo@cdc.gov. There is no charge for this service.

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About IAC Express
The Immunization Action Coalition welcomes redistribution of this issue of IAC Express or selected articles. When you do so, please add a note that the Immunization Action Coalition is the source of the material and provide a link to this issue.

If you have trouble receiving or displaying IAC Express messages, visit our online help section.

IAC Express is supported in part by Grant No. U38IP000589 from the National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases, CDC. Its contents are solely the responsibility of IAC and do not necessarily represent the official views of CDC. IAC Express is also supported by educational grants from the following companies: AstraZeneca, Inc.; bioCSL Inc.; Merck Sharp & Dohme Corp.; Pfizer, Inc.; and Sanofi Pasteur.
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CDC Provides Vaccine Recommendations for the 2016-2017 Influenza Season: Dr. Lisa Grohskopf from CDC's Influenza Division provides this Medscape Expert Commentary highlighting the 2016-2017 influenza vaccination recommendations from ACIP which include that everyone age 6 months and older should be vaccinated against influenza if they have no contraindications. Free, but Medscape log-in is required.
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