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January 2015 Back to top
January 27, 2015
A pediatric surgeon's 12-month-old child received the varicella vaccine and two days later developed a varicella-like rash. The surgeon had chickenpox as a child and had a positive varicella titer several years ago. Is it okay for the surgeon to continue to see patients? Also, is the varicella virus in the rash that develops following vaccination as virulent as the wild-type virus?
Because the surgeon is immune, the child's rash is not a problem and there is no need for the surgeon to restrict activity. In comparing a vaccine rash to wild-type chickenpox infection, transmission is less likely with a vaccine rash and, in general, there are fewer skin lesions.
January 20, 2015
If Kinrix (DTaP-IPV, GlaxoSmithKline) is inadvertently given to a child age 15 through 18 months, as the fourth DTaP dose and the third IPV dose, do the DTaP and IPV doses need to be repeated?
Since Kinrix is licensed and recommended only for children ages 4 through 6 years, you should take measures to prevent this error in the future. However, you can count this as a valid dose for DTaP and IPV as long as you met the minimum interval between administering dose #3 and dose #4 of DTaP (6 months) and dose #2 and dose #3 of IPV (4 weeks).
January 13, 2015
My patient is a 66-year-old male with a condition that requires treatment with intravenous immune globulin (IVIG) once a month. Can he receive zoster vaccine
Yes. The concern about interference by circulating antibody (from the IVIG), which we have for varicella vaccine, does not apply to zoster vaccine. The amount of antigen in zoster vaccine is high enough to offset any effect of circulating antibody. Also, studies of zoster vaccine were performed on patients receiving antibody-containing blood products with no appreciable effect on efficacy.
Do any of the bacterial vaccines that are recommended for people with functional or anatomic asplenia need to be given before splenectomy? Do the doses count if they are given during the 2 weeks prior to surgery?
Pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV13), Haemophilus influenzae type b vaccine (Hib), and meningococcal conjugate vaccine (MCV4) should be given 14 days before splenectomy, if possible. Doses given during the 2 weeks (14 days) before surgery can be counted as valid. If the doses cannot be given prior to the splenectomy, they should be given as soon as the patientís condition has stabilized after surgery. Pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine (PPSV23) should be administered 8 weeks after the dose of PCV13 for people 2 years of age and older.
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