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2019 Issues
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Issue 1450
Issue 1450: October 2, 2019


TOP STORIES


IAC HANDOUTS


VACCINE INFORMATION STATEMENTS


WORLD NEWS


FEATURED RESOURCES


JOURNAL ARTICLES AND NEWSLETTERS


CONFERENCES AND MEETINGS

 


TOP STORIES


NFID held annual influenza and pneumococcal news conference and CDC released 2018–19 influenza vaccine coverage data on September 26

The annual National Foundation for Infectious Diseases (NFID) Influenza and Pneumococcal Vaccination Kick-Off news conference was held in Washington, DC, on September 26. At the event, a panel of experts engaged in discussions about the previous and upcoming flu seasons. A press release titled US Health Officials Urge Influenza and Pneumococcal Disease Vaccination was issued.

CDC also announced the kick-off event on its website and on the same day released influenza vaccine coverage data for the 2018–19 influenza season. Five paragraphs from the CDC web page National Press Conference Kicks Off 2019–2020 Flu Vaccination Campaign are reprinted below.
 
“Overall, CDC estimates show that flu vaccination coverage has increased over the past decade, though the increase has been more impressive in children.
 
Vaccination among kids across all ages, 6 months through 17 years, was almost 63 percent—an increase of almost 5 percentage points from 2017–2018 and about 3 percentage points from 2016–2017. As usual, coverage was highest among the youngest kids, (6 months to 4 years), at 73 percent. Also, typical, coverage among teens 13 to 17 years old was lowest at 52 percent last season. Looking at a longer-term trend, flu vaccination coverage in children 6 months through 17 years has increased more than 10 percentage points since 2010–2011. Since that time, the most impressive gain in flu vaccination coverage among children has been in teens 13 to 17 years old, where coverage has increased by 20 percentage points. Secretary Azar called the increase in vaccination among children “wonderful.”
 
Vaccination coverage among adults is around 45%, leaving more than half of adult Americans unprotected from flu each season. Sixty-eight percent of people 65 and older were vaccinated last season, making them once again the most vaccinated among the adult population. Adults 18 to 49 years old were the least vaccinated at 35%. Looking back to 2010–2011, flu vaccine coverage in adults overall was just under 41%. Coverage in people 65 and older was nearly 67% and in people 18 to 49 years it was just under 31%. Estimates for 2018–19 show an increase of about 4 percentage points since 2010–2011 in adults overall and adults 18 to 49 years, but very little improvement in coverage among adults 65 and older.
 
Flu vaccination coverage varied significantly by state. During last flu season, vaccination coverage in adults ranged from 34 percent in Nevada to 56 percent in Rhode Island. Flu vaccination coverage in children ranged from 46 percent in Wyoming to 81 percent in Massachusetts. Non-Hispanic white adults had higher coverage rates than non-Hispanic black, Hispanic, Asian, and American Indian/Alaska Native adults and adults of other or multiple races. Among children, Asian children had higher coverage rates than children in all other racial/ethnic groups.
 
Vaccination among health care workers last season was similar to recent prior seasons. CDC estimates 81 percent of all health care workers got vaccinated last season, but only 68 percent of long-term care workers got vaccinated. Secretary Azar underscored the importance of seeing that number increase because many long-term care workers work with people who are especially vulnerable to severe complications from flu.”


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Kids Plus Pediatrics, a private practice in Pennsylvania, launches a new website and toolkit to aid healthcare providers and practices in fighting back against anti-vaccine social media attacks

In response to a week-long, global, and coordinated attack from anti-vaccine groups nearly two years ago, Kids Plus Pediatrics, an independent, physician-owned practice in Pennsylvania, launched a new website and toolkit, Shots Heard Round the World. This volunteer, vetted, online digital cavalry will come to the aid of any provider, practice, hospital, or health system attacked by anti-vaccine forces on social media. A message from Todd Wolynn, MD, MMM, IBCLC, president and CEO of Kids Plus Pediatrics, is reprinted below.
 
This Monday, September 23rd, two years to the day since the end of our attack, we released our Anti-Anti Vaccine Social Media Toolkit to help our colleagues prepare for, defend against, and clean up after anti-vaccine attacks. The toolkit will be available for download on the Shots Heard website.
 
The timing of these releases represents a message: “we survived, we thrived and now we’re arming vaccine advocates globally against an attack on child and public health.” Kids Plus stands in solidarity with vaccine advocates worldwide, and we are dedicated to addressing anti-vaccine bullying, threats, and attacks on all advocates for vaccines and evidence-based medicine. We look forward to continuing our collaborative work with vaccine advocates into 2020 and beyond.
 
Kids Plus Pediatrics and I want to thank you all for the work you do to improve vaccine communication and uptake. We hope www.ShotsHeard.com, our Toolkit and ongoing work will provide additional needed resources and help to increase immunization rates.


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NBC News and The New York Times publish articles about the growing anti-vaccine movement in the U.S.

On September 24, NBC News published an investigative report titled How Anti-vaxxers Target Grieving Moms and Turn Them into Crusaders against Vaccines. The subheadline and introductory paragraph are reprinted below.

Anti-vaccine advocates find women whose babies have died unexpectedly and convince them vaccines are to blame.

Fifteen miles west of Minneapolis, a billboard looms over a field of tall grass beside Highway 55. The sign features a photo of Evee Clobes, a baby girl with sparkling eyes, flushed cheeks and an expression frozen in wonder. Next to her face are the words, "HEALTHY BABIES DON'T JUST DIE." The web address of a group opposed to mandatory vaccinations is at the bottom...


Another recent article, published on September 23 in The New York Times and titled How Anti-vaccine Sentiment Took Hold in the United States, addresses the rise of vaccine resistance, a movement which has been decades in the making. The introductory paragraph is reprinted below. 

The question is often whispered, the questioners sheepish. But increasingly, parents at the Central Park playground where Dr. Elizabeth A. Comen takes her young children have been asking her: “Do you vaccinate your kids?”

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IAC Spotlight: Just in case you missed them, these IAC materials and web pages were updated during August and September
 
In almost every issue of IAC Express, we provide readers with information about new and updated educational materials for healthcare professionals and handouts for patients that have been posted during the past week on IAC’s website for healthcare professionals, immunize.org. All these materials are CDC-reviewed and available free for you to download, print, copy, and distribute in your healthcare settings. We also announce major updates to the content on various web sections and pages on immunize.org.
 
Below you’ll find a listing of the new and updated educational materials and web pages we’ve announced in IAC Express during the months of August and September, in case you’ve missed any of them.

Educational Materials for Healthcare Professionals

Influenza Materials for Healthcare Professionals

Other Staff Education Materials

Handouts for Your Patients

Updated Web Pages

Updated VIS Web Pages

Related Links

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CDC updates job aids to assist healthcare providers in interpreting Tdap catch-up recommendations in the child and adolescent immunization schedules

CDC has updated two job aids to help providers figure out exactly what is needed for children and adolescents who are behind schedule with Tdap vaccine. CDC has updated these resources to match current immunization recommendations and there are now two separate job aids based on age.

Although this information is available in the annual U.S. Catch-Up Immunization Schedule for Persons Aged 4 Months Through 18 Years Who Start Late or Who Are More Than 1 Month Behind, the format of these two updated resources makes it easier to determine what is needed (number of doses and timing) in a particular situation. The first pages of both revised 2-page Tdap pieces are shown below to illustrate the easy-to-follow format.




Explore these revised resources by clicking on the following links:

All these job aids can be accessed from CDC's Vaccine Catch-Up Guidance web section.

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IAC’s new "FLU VACCINE" buttons and stickers are flying out the door! But don't worry. We’ve got you covered. Keep stocking up for flu season!

Everyone wants to display flu shot support—don’t be left out! Jump-start your preparations for the 2019–20 influenza season by ordering IAC's new “FLU VACCINE” buttons and stickers from SHOP IAC. These popular new resources are modeled after “I Voted” stickers, which are given to voters in many states as they leave the polls on Election Day. The flu vaccine buttons and stickers are bright red to help broadcast your important vaccination message. And the cost is low!



“FLU VACCINE” BUTTONS

Demonstrate your clinic-wide support for protecting everyone from influenza by purchasing buttons for all staff to wear. Measuring 1.25" across, the button is understated in size but carries a bold message! Brightly colored red, round button with white text and a metal pin that clasps on the back.

Pin on your lab coat, uniform, other clothing, tote bag, or backpack to show support for influenza vaccination. Wear it when flu vaccine is available in your clinic to remind patients and the public to protect themselves from influenza.
 
Buttons are delivered in bags of 10 buttons per bag. Click here for pricing and ordering information.

“FLU VACCINE” STICKERS
 
These brightly colored red, round stickers measure 1.5" across. Printed on Avery labels, they adhere well to clothing and have an easy-peel-off back.
 
Wearing these brightly colored stickers, your patients will be letting their communities know that influenza vaccination is important.

Suitable for clinic staff, too! Urge all staff to wear them at work during flu vaccination season. This sends a powerful reminder to patients to get vaccinated.
 
Stickers are delivered to you cut individually (not on rolls)—available in bundles of 100. 

Click here for pricing and ordering information for “FLU VACCINE” buttons and stickers.

Related Links

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Reminder: Visit newly updated www.Give2MenACWY.org to enhance your efforts at increasing rates of the MenACWY booster and other adolescent vaccines

On August 7, IAC announced a major upgrade to its collaborative website promoting the importance of receiving a booster dose of meningococcal ACWY (MenACWY) vaccine.

 

Aimed at healthcare professionals, the site has been revised to incorporate newly updated materials and to highlight the importance of all recommended vaccines for 16-year-olds. A simplified navigation structure makes locating information a breeze.
 
The colorful new Give2MenACWY.org website is divided into five easy-to-access sections: 

  • Vaccinate Teens – The tools included on this web page offer helpful information on teen vaccination schedules and tips for improving adolescent immunization rates.
  • Give 2 Doses – Fewer than half of teens have received the recommended second dose of MenACWY vaccine. This web page offers tools to help providers improve second dose coverage.
  • 16-Year-Old Visit – These resources help both providers and their patients remember the important vaccines recommended for 16-year-olds.
  • Tools for Providers – These tools from CDC, IAC, and other organizations explain meningococcal ACWY vaccine recommendations and assist in improving adolescent coverage for all recommended vaccines.
  • Resources – This section contains a wealth of information to assist provider efforts to improve adolescent immunization rates. The materials are subdivided into subsections for print materials, links to organizations involved in adolescent immunization, personal stories about the importance of vaccination, and additional resources of interest. 

Additional time savings are provided by the site’s single location where all website materials are listed according to whether they are primarily of interest to providers or to patients/parents. Other sections relate to general adolescent immunization, as well as meningococcal disease and vaccine information.

Visit Give2MenACWY.org and enjoy browsing (and hopefully deploying) its terrific resources, brought to you by our collaboration with Sanofi Pasteur.
  
Related Links 

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Five healthcare organizations join IAC's Influenza Vaccination Honor Roll for mandatory healthcare worker vaccination

There are now 848 organizations enrolled in IAC's Influenza Vaccination Honor Roll. The honor roll recognizes hospitals, long-term care facilities (LTCFs), medical practices, pharmacies, professional organizations, health departments, and other government entities that have taken a stand for patient safety by implementing mandatory influenza vaccination policies for healthcare personnel.

Since September 4, when IAC Express last reported on the Influenza Vaccination Honor Roll, five additional healthcare organizations have been enrolled.

IAC urges qualifying healthcare organizations to apply by visiting the Application page.

Newly added healthcare organizations:

  • Advantage Care Health Center, Brookville, NY
  • Ascension St. Joseph Hospital, Tawas, MI
  • Ascension Standish Hospital, Standish, MI
  • SSM Health St. Anthony Hospital Shawnee, Shawnee, OK
  • Vail Health Hospital, Vail, CO

Related Links

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FDA issues news release announcing its approval of the first live, non-replicating vaccine to prevent smallpox and monkeypox

On September 24, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) issued a statement announcing its approval of a new vaccine to prevent smallpox and monkeypox. The first two paragraphs of the press release are reprinted below.

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration announced today the approval of Jynneos Smallpox and Monkeypox Vaccine, Live, Non-Replicating, for the prevention of smallpox and monkeypox disease in adults 18 years of age and older determined to be at high risk for smallpox or monkeypox infection. This is the only currently FDA-approved vaccine for the prevention of monkeypox disease.

“Following the global Smallpox Eradication Program, the World Health Organization certified the eradication of naturally occurring smallpox disease in 1980. Routine vaccination of the American public was stopped in 1972 after the disease was eradicated in the U.S. and, as a result, a large proportion of the U.S., as well as the global population has no immunity,” said Peter Marks, M.D., Ph.D., director of the FDA’s Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research. “Therefore, although naturally occurring smallpox disease is no longer a global threat, the intentional release of this highly contagious virus could have a devastating effect. Today’s approval reflects the U.S. government’s commitment to preparedness through support for the development of safe and effective vaccines, therapeutics, and other medical countermeasures.”


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Two new measles cases reported to CDC in week ending September 26; total cases for 2019 increase to 1,243 across 31 states

CDC has posted its latest update on 2019 measles cases in the U.S. on its Measles Cases and Outbreaks web page. The web page shows a preliminary estimate of 1,243 cases across 31 states as of September 26. This is the greatest number of cases reported in the U.S. since 1992 and since measles was declared eliminated from the U.S. in 2000.

The states that have reported cases to CDC are Alaska, Arizona, California, Colorado, Connecticut, Florida, Georgia, Hawaii, Idaho, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kentucky, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, Michigan, Missouri, New Mexico, Nevada, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, Ohio, Oklahoma, Oregon, Pennsylvania, Texas, Tennessee, Virginia, and Washington. 

Access additional information about U.S. measles cases in 2019 on CDC's Measles Cases and Outbreaks web page.

Measles can cause serious complications. As of September 26, 131 of the people who got measles this year were hospitalized, and 65 reported having complications, including pneumonia and encephalitis.

Related Links

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NCQA announces new publicly reported quality measure for immunizing pregnant women

In September 2019, the National Committee for Quality Assurance (NCQA) announced that Prenatal Immunization Status (PRS) will be the first publicly reported Electronic Clinical Data System (ECDS) measure (at the link, click on the plus sign to expand the subheadline "Public Reporting for Measurement Year 2020").

Health plans will use the prenatal immunization quality measure in HEDIS Measurement Year 2020 and report the results in June 2021. 

Influenza and Tdap vaccination of pregnant women are critical measures to protect infants from severe influenza illness, whooping cough, and tetanus. However, CDC surveys of pregnant women indicate that only 33% of pregnant women currently receive both influenza and Tdap vaccines as recommended. Influenza vaccine is recommended for all women who will be pregnant during the influenza season and can be given any time during pregnancy. Tdap vaccination is recommended ideally during 27–36 weeks’ gestation. 

A portion of HEDIS’s ECDS webpage subheadline Public Reporting for Measurement Year 2020 is reprinted below.

Public reporting of an ECDS measure is a critical step in the use of clinical data systems to measure quality.
 
Using and sharing clinical data will enrich the information available to providers who care for patients. Measures drawn directly from digital records can also reduce the burden on providers to collect data for quality reporting.


Access information about this new measure at HEDIS Electronic Clinical Data System (ECDS) Reporting.

Related Links

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IAC HANDOUTS


IAC updates Turkish-language translation of "Screening Checklist for Contraindications to Vaccines for Adults"

IAC recently posted the Turkish-language translation of its Screening Checklist for Contraindications to Vaccines for Adults. Changes were made to create a separate question regarding an immune system problem in the adult's first-degree relatives, and on page 2, to condense the several references into only two.

IAC thanks Betül Polatdemir, MD, Lokman Hekim Hospital Group, Ankara and Sibel Bostancıoğlu, MD, Ankara Occupational and Environmental Diseases Hospital, Ankara, Turkey, for generously providing the translation.

Related Links

IAC's Handouts for Patients & Staff web section offers healthcare professionals and the public more than 250 FREE English-language handouts (many also available in translation), which we encourage website users to print out, copy, and distribute widely.

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VACCINE INFORMATION STATEMENTS


IAC posts Thai-language translation of the MenACWY VIS

IAC recently posted an updated Thai translation of the MenACWY VIS. IAC thanks Asian Pacific Health Care Venture Inc. for generously providing the translation. 

The new Thai translation is for the MenACWY VIS published on August 24, 2018. On August 15, 2019, CDC released a new interim VIS for MenACWY; a translation of this new interim VIS is not available. CDC states that it is acceptable to use the out-of-date VIS translation since there have not been significant content changes in the 2019 "interim" version compared with the August 24, 2018 VIS.
 
CDC also states that the corresponding up-to-date English-language VIS must also be provided when providing an out-of-date translation.

Related Links

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WORLD NEWS


CDC and WHO report on worldwide progress toward poliovirus containment in this week's MMWR and Weekly Epidemiological Record, respectively

CDC published Progress Towards Poliovirus Containment Implementation—Worldwide, 2018–2019 in the September 27 issue of MMWR (pages 825–829). On the same day, WHO's Weekly Epidemiological Record published a similar article titled Progress Towards Poliovirus Containment Worldwide, 2018–2019. A media summary of the MMWR article is reprinted below.

Retaining eradicated polioviruses is a risk and responsibility. Countries around the world have committed to implementing and monitoring safeguards for the long-term containment of polioviruses once wild poliovirus is eradicated. It is imperative that this work be accelerated for type 2 poliovirus, which was declared eradicated in 2015. Containment of eradicated polioviruses is critical to sustaining a polio-free world. Following the certification of eradication of each poliovirus type, remaining poliovirus stocks must be destroyed. However, some stocks will be needed and kept for vaccine manufacture and key research in a limited number of laboratories and facilities worldwide. Ensuring the safe and secure handling and storage (containment) of these viruses is essential to minimize risk of them being released into communities, where they could once again cause paralysis and death in susceptible populations. This report provides an update on global progress for the containment of the already-eradicated type 2 wild poliovirus, containment action that will be required for type 3 wild poliovirus for which declaration of eradication is anticipated, and containment implications for the continued use of live type 2 containing polio vaccine.

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FEATURED RESOURCES


CDC posts flu fighter profiles as part of their #WhyIFightFlu campaign, featuring members of the public describing why they fight flu and how flu has impacted their lives

Every year people around the world work to study, track, and prevent flu. As part of the #WhyIFightFlu campaign, CDC has posted a series of flu fighter profiles, featuring members of the public describing why they fight flu and how flu has impacted their lives. 



If you are interested in sharing your own flu fighter profiles online or on social media, here’s how:
  • Pick 1–3 images demonstrating your work as a flu fighter.
  • Write a 2–4 sentence post about why you fight flu.
  • Share these images and message on social media!

Be sure to include the hashtag #WhyIFightFlu or #FightFlu and tag @CDCFlu in your post!

Related Links

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IAC's comprehensive Vaccinating Adults: A Step-by-Step Guide is available for free download either by chapter or in its entirety (142 pages)

In late 2017, the Immunization Action Coalition (IAC) announced the publication of its new book, Vaccinating Adults: A Step-by-Step Guide (Guide).



This completely updated "how to" guide on adult immunization provides easy-to-use, practical information covering essential adult immunization activities. It helps vaccine providers enhance their existing adult immunization services or introduce them into any clinical setting. Topics include:

  • setting up for vaccination services,
  • storing and handling vaccines,
  • deciding which people should receive which vaccines,
  • administering vaccines,
  • documenting vaccinations (including legal issues), and
  • understanding financial considerations and billing information.

In addition, the Guide is filled with hundreds of web addresses and references to help providers stay up to date on the latest immunization information, both now and in the future.

The Guide is available to download/print either by chapter or in its entirety free of charge at www.immunize.org/guide. The downloaded version is suitable for double-sided printing. The National Vaccine Program Office and CDC both supported the development of the Guide and provided early technical review.

The Guide is a uniquely valuable resource to assist providers in increasing adult immunization rates. Be sure to get a copy today!

Related Links

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JOURNAL ARTICLES AND NEWSLETTERS


September issue of CDC's Immunization Works newsletter now available

CDC recently released the September issue of its monthly newsletter Immunization Works. The newsletter offers the immunization community information about current topics. The information is in the public domain and can be reproduced and circulated widely.

Related Links

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Vaccine Education Center at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia publishes September issue of its newsletter Vaccine Update 

The Vaccine Education Center (VEC) at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia publishes a monthly immunization-focused newsletter titled Vaccine Update. The September issue includes the following articles:

Additional resources, including information booklets for patients, are available in the full newsletter.

Access the sign-up form to subscribe to Vaccine Update.

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CONFERENCES AND MEETINGS


Reminder: National Conference for Immunization Coalitions and Partnerships will take place November 13–15 in Honolulu

The 14th National Conference for Immunization Coalitions and Partnerships (NCICP) will take place in beautiful Honolulu from November 13–15. Conference attendees will learn from expert speakers and network with members of immunization coalitions from around the nation.

Keynote speakers will include Nancy Messonnier, MD, director, National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases, CDC, and Erica DeWald, directory of advocacy, Vaccinate Your Family. The conference will also include 40 breakout sessions, as well as research and coalition posters.

Click on the graphic below for more information about the conference, including registration.



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About IAC Express
The Immunization Action Coalition welcomes redistribution of this issue of IAC Express or selected articles. When you do so, please add a note that the Immunization Action Coalition is the source of the material and provide a link to this issue.

If you have trouble receiving or displaying IAC Express messages, visit our online help section.

IAC Express is supported in part by Grant No. 6NH23IP922550 from the National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases, CDC. Its contents are solely the responsibility of IAC and do not necessarily represent the official views of CDC. IAC Express is also supported by educational grants from the following companies: AstraZeneca, Inc.; Merck Sharp & Dohme Corp.; Pfizer, Inc.; and Sanofi Pasteur.

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AAFP: American Academy of Family Physicians
AAP: American Academy of Pediatrics
ACIP: Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices
CDC: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
FDA: Food and Drug Administration
IAC: Immunization Action Coalition
MMWR: Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report
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This website is supported in part by a cooperative agreement from the National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases (Grant No. 1NH23IP922654) at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in Atlanta, GA. The website content is the sole responsibility of IAC and does not necessarily represent the official views of CDC.