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Issue 1441
Issue 1441: August 21, 2019


TOP STORIES


IAC HANDOUTS


WORLD NEWS


FEATURED RESOURCES


JOURNAL ARTICLES AND NEWSLETTERS


EDUCATION AND TRAINING



TOP STORIES


CDC releases new “interim” VISs for hepatitis B; influenza, inactivated or recombinant; influenza, live intranasal; MenACWY; MenB; MMR; MMRV; and varicella vaccines; as well as a “final” VIS for Japanese encephalitis vaccine

CDC has released new “interim” VISs for hepatitis B; influenza, inactivated or recombinant; influenza, live intranasal; MenACWY; MenB; MMR; MMRV; and varicella vaccines; as well as a “final” VIS for Japanese encephalitis vaccine. 

Access these new VISs on IAC's website, immunize.org/vis:

Interim VISs

Final VIS

Providers are encouraged to begin using these VISs immediately, but stocks of the previous editions may be used until their supply has run out.

Translations of previous VIS versions may be used until new translations become available. CDC states that the corresponding up-to-date English-language VIS must also be supplied when providing an out-of-date translation.

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CDC publishes “Human Papillomavirus Vaccination for Adults: Updated Recommendations of the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices” in this week’s MMWR

CDC published Human Papillomavirus Vaccination for Adults: Updated Recommendations of the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (pages 698–702) in the August 16 issue of MMWR (pages 698–702). A summary made available to the press is reprinted below.

CDC recommends vaccination against human papillomavirus (HPV) at age 11 to 12 years, and now also recommends catch-up vaccination through age 26 years for all genders. Although CDC does not recommend catch-up vaccination for all adults ages 27 through 45 years, some people in this age range who are at risk for new HPV infection might benefit from vaccination. HPV vaccine prevents new HPV infections that can cause cancers and other health problems. Because vaccination provides the most benefit when given before exposure to any HPV, it is recommended for all 11- to 12-year-olds. Catch-up recommendations apply to people not vaccinated as preteens. This report updates CDC recommendations for adults in the United States. It harmonizes the catch-up age through age 26 years for all genders and adds guidance about HPV vaccination for adults ages 27 through 45 years who are at risk for new HPV infection and might benefit from vaccination. Although 9-valent HPV vaccine is licensed for use through age 45 years, CDC does not recommend it for all such adults, and clinicians need not discuss HPV vaccination with all adults over the age of 26 years because most people in this age range are unlikely to benefit from vaccination.

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Vaccinate Your Family and the entire immunization community mourn the loss of Rich Greenaway

Vaccinate Your Family (VYF, formerly Every Child by Two) and the entire immunization community mourn the loss of Rich Greenaway. Rich was the director of operations and special projects at VYF. He had devoted more than two decades to protecting people from vaccine-preventable diseases.

Executive Director Amy Pisani posted a remembrance about Rich on the VYF blog on August 16 along with photos. The first paragraph is reprinted below.

This past weekend, Vaccinate Your Family (VYF) lost a beloved colleague and close friend. Rich Greenaway, our Director of Operations and Special Projects, passed away unexpectedly at his home on Sunday. Rich was a committed champion of vaccinations and a superlative human being who dedicated more than two decades of his life to protecting people of all ages from vaccine-preventable diseases. He will be dearly missed by all who knew him.

Rich's obituary and information about his guestbook and funeral services are available at the DeVol Funeral Home website.

All of us at IAC mourn Rich's untimely passing. He was a person of intelligence, kindness, and compassion. His absence will be profoundly felt by everyone at IAC and in the immunization community.

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Award-winning documentary HILLEMAN—A Perilous Quest to Save the World's Children available for free streaming in honor of the August 30 birth centennial of Dr. Maurice Hilleman, "father of modern vaccines"

The award-winning documentary HILLEMAN—A Perilous Quest to Save the World’s Children will be available for free streaming to honor Dr. Maurice Hilleman on the 100th anniversary of his birth on August 30, 1919. Mr. Hilleman is considered by many to be the father of modern vaccines because of his work in preventing pandemic flu, combining the measles, mumps, and rubella vaccines, and other achievements. Produced by Medical History Pictures, the film is a project of the Vaccine Makers Project at the Vaccine Education Center of the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia.

Access the streaming link through the hillemanfilm.com/happy-birthday web page for free viewing from 6:00 p.m. (ET) on August 29 through 12:00 p.m. (ET), August 31.

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August is National Immunization Awareness Month; promote vaccination with CDC resources

August is National Immunization Awareness Month (NIAM). This annual observance highlights the efforts of healthcare professionals to protect patients of all ages against vaccine-preventable diseases through on-time vaccination.

CDC’s NIAM web page includes two toolkits, one for communicating with healthcare professionals and the other for communicating with parents and patients. Each includes key messages, sample social media content, and educational resources.



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New powerful tools, quick navigation, beautiful design: Visit Give2MenACWY.org to enhance your efforts at increasing MenACWY booster dose rates and other adolescent vaccines

On August 7, IAC announced a major upgrade to its collaborative website promoting the importance of receiving a booster dose of meningococcal ACWY (MenACWY) vaccine.

 

Aimed at healthcare professionals, the site has been revised to incorporate newly updated materials and to highlight the importance of all recommended vaccines for 16-year-olds. A simplified navigation structure makes locating information a breeze.
 
The colorful new Give2MenACWY.org website is divided into five easy-to-access sections: 

  • Vaccinate Teens – The tools included on this web page offer helpful information on teen vaccination schedules and tips for improving adolescent immunization rates.
  • Give 2 Doses – Fewer than half of teens have received the recommended second dose of MenACWY vaccine. This web page offers tools to help providers improve second dose coverage.
  • 16-Year-Old Visit – These resources help both providers and their patients remember the important vaccines recommended for 16-year-olds.
  • Tools for Providers – These tools from CDC, IAC, and other organizations explain meningococcal ACWY vaccine recommendations and assist in improving adolescent coverage for all recommended vaccines.
  • Resources – This section contains a wealth of information to assist provider efforts to improve adolescent immunization rates. The materials are subdivided into subsections for print materials, links to organizations involved in adolescent immunization, personal stories about the importance of vaccination, and additional resources of interest. 

Additional time savings are provided by the site’s single location where all website materials are listed according to whether they are primarily of interest to providers or to patients/parents. Other sections relate to general adolescent immunization, as well as meningococcal disease and vaccine information.
 
Visit Give2MenACWY.org and enjoy browsing (and hopefully deploying) its terrific resources, brought to you by our collaboration with Sanofi Pasteur.
  
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IAC Spotlight! IAC’s "Adult Vaccination" web page is full of resources to help you vaccinate adults in your practice

IAC's Adult Vaccination: Resources for Adult Vaccination web page in the Clinic Tools web section on immunize.org is full of resources from IAC and its partner organizations to help you vaccinate adults this fall and throughout the year!



In the left-hand column of the Adult Vaccination: Resources for Adult Vaccination web page, you will find IAC's educational tools related to adult immunization, including handouts for healthcare professionals and for patients, standing orders templates, and a link to all of IAC's Adult Vaccination educational materials. 

In the right-hand column of the web page, you will find links to adult vaccination resources from IAC's partner organizations, including CDC, American College of Physicians, American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, American Academy of Family Physicians, National Adult and Influenza Immunization Summit, National Vaccine Program Office, and National Foundation for Infectious Diseases.

Find all the resources and tools you need for adult immunization by visiting IAC's Adult Vaccination: Resources for Adult Vaccination web page at www.immunize.org/adult-vaccination today!

Related Links

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Total number of U.S. measles cases for 2019 climbs to 1,203 with 21 new cases reported since last week

CDC has posted its latest update on 2019 measles cases in the U.S. on its Measles Cases and Outbreaks web page. The web page shows a preliminary estimate of 1,203 cases across 30 states as of August 15. This is the greatest number of cases reported in the U.S. since 1992 and since measles was declared eliminated from the U.S. in 2000.

The states that have reported cases to CDC are Alaska, Arizona, California, Colorado, Connecticut, Florida, Georgia, Idaho, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kentucky, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, Michigan, Missouri, New Mexico, Nevada, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, Ohio, Oklahoma, Oregon, Pennsylvania, Texas, Tennessee, Virginia, and Washington.

Access additional information about U.S. measles cases in 2019 on CDC's Measles Cases and Outbreaks web page.

Measles outbreaks (defined as three or more cases) are currently ongoing in 2019 in the following jurisdictions:

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IAC HANDOUTS


IAC updates "Current Dates of Vaccine Information Statements" and “You Must Provide Patients with Vaccine Information Statements (VISs)—It’s Federal Law!”

IAC recently updated Current Dates of Vaccine Information Statements as well as You Must Provide Patients with Vaccine Information Statements (VISs)—It’s Federal Law! to reflect the new 8/15/19 date of the recently updated VISs for hepatitis B, influenza (both IIV and LAIV), Japanese encephalitis, MenACWY, MenB, MMR, MMRV, and varicella vaccines.

  

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WORLD NEWS


WHO reports on yellow fever in Africa and the Americas in this week's Weekly Epidemiological Record

WHO published Yellow Fever in Africa and the Americas, 2018 in the August 16 issue of its Weekly Epidemiological Record. The first paragraph is reprinted below.

Review of the year 2018
In 2018, there were major yellow fever (YF) outbreaks in 5 countries: Brazil, Congo, Ethiopia, Nigeria and South Sudan, and cases with epidemic potential were reported from the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC).  Additionally, signals of disease activity in Africa were reported from Central African Republic (CAR), Guinea and Liberia, and in the Americas from Bolivia, Colombia, French Guiana and Peru. In Nigeria, a country that has seen re-emergence of YF outbreaks over a wide geographical area since September 2017, the largest outbreak in 2018 was in Edo State. The outbreaks in both Edo State, Nigeria, and Ethiopia were characterized by clusters of cases in a concentrated geographical area in a relatively short time and in proximity to densely populated urban areas and routes. In both outbreaks, rapid identification, investigation and response were instrumental in avoiding intense amplification and onward spread.
 

Access the complete article: Yellow Fever in Africa and the Americas, 2018 

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FEATURED RESOURCES

New! “FLU VACCINE” buttons and stickers now available for purchase from IAC

Start your preparations for the 2019–20 influenza season by ordering IAC's new “FLU VACCINE” buttons and stickers from SHOP IAC. These new resources are modeled after “I Voted” stickers, which are given to voters in many states as they leave the polls on Election Day. The flu vaccine buttons and stickers are bright red to help broadcast your important vaccination message. And the cost is low!



“FLU VACCINE” BUTTONS

Demonstrate your clinic-wide support for protecting everyone from influenza by purchasing buttons for all staff to wear. Measuring 1.25" across, the button is understated in size but carries a bold message! Brightly colored red, round button with white text and a metal pin that clasps on the back.

Pin on your lab coat, uniform, other clothing, tote bag, or backpack to show support for influenza vaccination. Wear it when flu vaccine is available in your clinic to remind patients and the public to protect themselves from influenza.
 
Buttons are delivered in bags of 10 buttons per bag. Click here for pricing and ordering.

“FLU VACCINE” STICKERS
 
These brightly colored red, round stickers measure 1.5" across. Printed on Avery labels, they adhere well to clothing and have an easy-peel-off back.
 
Wearing these brightly colored stickers, your patients will be letting their communities know that influenza vaccination is important.

Suitable for clinic staff, too! Urge all staff to wear them at work during flu vaccination season. This sends a powerful reminder to patients to get vaccinated.
 
Stickers are delivered to you cut individually (not on rolls)—available in bundles of 100. Click here for pricing and ordering information.

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ShotByShot.org adds new infographics and Instagram features to its collection of stories about people with vaccine-preventable diseases

ShotbyShot.org, a program of the California Immunization Coalition, features a collection of videos and stories about real people affected by vaccine-preventable diseases. ShotbyShot.org recently added infographics and an Instagram account @shotbyshotorg so that you can more easily share its videos and written stories on social media, during health events, or in waiting rooms to put a face on vaccine-preventable diseases.

Share a story or follow ShotbyShot.org on Facebook@ /shotbyshot.org, Twitter@ /shotbyshotorg, and Instagram@ /shotbyshotorg.   

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IAC's comprehensive Vaccinating Adults: A Step-by-Step Guide is available for free download either by chapter or in its entirety (142 pages)

In late 2017, the Immunization Action Coalition (IAC) announced the publication of its new book, Vaccinating Adults: A Step-by-Step Guide (Guide).



This completely updated "how to" guide on adult immunization provides easy-to-use, practical information covering essential adult immunization activities. It helps vaccine providers enhance their existing adult immunization services or introduce them into any clinical setting. Topics include:

  • setting up for vaccination services,
  • storing and handling vaccines,
  • deciding which people should receive which vaccines,
  • administering vaccines,
  • documenting vaccinations (including legal issues), and
  • understanding financial considerations and billing information.

In addition, the Guide is filled with hundreds of web addresses and references to help providers stay up to date on the latest immunization information, both now and in the future.

The Guide is available to download/print either by chapter or in its entirety free of charge at www.immunize.org/guide. The downloaded version is suitable for double-sided printing. The National Vaccine Program Office and CDC both supported the development of the Guide and provided early technical review.

The Guide is a uniquely valuable resource to assist providers in increasing adult immunization rates. Be sure to get a copy today!

Related Links

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JOURNAL ARTICLES AND NEWSLETTERS


In this week’s MMWR, CDC publishes two “Notes from the Field” articles on rabies outbreaks in the Dominican Republic and Haiti

In the August 16 issue of MMWR, CDC published Notes from the Field: Rabies Outbreak Investigation—Pedernales, Dominican Republic, 2019 (pages 704–706) and Notes from the Field: A Multipartner Response to Prevent a Binational Rabies Outbreak—Anse-à-Pitre, Haiti, 2019 (pages 707–709). A summary for the media, which refers to both articles, is reprinted below.

Following an increase in human rabies cases in a province of Dominican Republic bordering Haiti, both countries and international partners launched a robust outbreak response to prevent additional cases, control rabies on both sides of the border, and identify future opportunities to improve rabies prevention in the area. In July 2018, Pedernales Province in Dominican Republic reported its first case of human rabies in more than 30 years. By the end of 2018, two additional cases had been reported, all three occurring in young children. Because Pedernales borders the community of Anse-a-Pitre, Haiti, public health officials in both countries launched a coordinated outbreak response with assistance from CDC and international partners. The investigation and response focused on active surveillance for animal bites and rabies cases, evaluation and expansion of dog vaccination coverage, verification of potency of rabies vaccines used for dogs and people, and evaluation of whether dogs might be crossing the border between the two countries. Due to the close association of the two areas and mixing of dog populations, continued coordination will be necessary for effective rabies prevention and control.

Related Links

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EDUCATION AND TRAINING


CDC webinar, "Strategies for Addressing Vaccine Misinformation in the Practice," to be offered August 28

In collaboration with the Public Health Foundation, CDC will offer a webinar on August 28 from 1:00–2:00 p.m. (ET) titled Strategies for Addressing Vaccine Misinformation in the Practice. Opening remarks will be made by Dr. Amanda Cohn, acting chief medical officer, Vaccine Policy, Preparedness, Global Health in CDC’s NCIRD. Featured speakers will include two from RefuahHealth Center, a New York-based federally qualified health center that serves communities experiencing the ongoing measles outbreak: Chanie Sternberg, Refuah’s president and CEO, and Dr. Corinna Manini, Refuah’s chief medical officer. Additionally, we will hear from Dr. Todd Wolynn, CEO of Kids Plus Pediatrics, a practicing pediatrician, and a vocal advocate for effective communication with vaccine hesitant parents.

Access additional information and the registration link.

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Reminder: Weekly CDC webinar series on "The Pink Book" chapter topics runs through September 25; register now

Register for CDC's 15-part, live CE-accredited series of 1-hour webinars designed to provide a chapter-by-chapter overview of the 13th edition of Epidemiology and Prevention of Vaccine-Preventable Diseases (also known as "The Pink Book"). Topics include specific vaccines and the diseases they prevent, general recommendations for vaccines, vaccination principles, and immunization strategies for providers.  
 
All sessions begin at 12:00 p.m. (ET). This series began on June 5 and will run through September 25, 2019. The next two webinars are scheduled as follows:
  • August 28: Varicella and Zoster
  • September 4: Hepatitis B
Recordings of sessions will be available online within 2 weeks after each webinar.

Information on registration and program details are available on CDC's Pink Book Webinar Series web page.

All the sections of "The Pink Book" (i.e., chapters, appendices, 2017 supplement) are available to download at no charge at www.cdc.gov/vaccines/pubs/pinkbook/index.html. You can also order this resource from the Public Health Foundation for $40 plus shipping and handling.

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About IAC Express
The Immunization Action Coalition welcomes redistribution of this issue of IAC Express or selected articles. When you do so, please add a note that the Immunization Action Coalition is the source of the material and provide a link to this issue.

If you have trouble receiving or displaying IAC Express messages, visit our online help section.

IAC Express is supported in part by Grant No. 6NH23IP922550 from the National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases, CDC. Its contents are solely the responsibility of IAC and do not necessarily represent the official views of CDC. IAC Express is also supported by educational grants from the following companies: AstraZeneca, Inc.; Merck Sharp & Dohme Corp.; Pfizer, Inc.; and Sanofi Pasteur.

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Video of the Week
Actress Marcia Cross's Fight—Breaking the Stigma around HPV and Cancer: After her husband experienced HPV-related throat cancer, actress Marcia Cross was diagnosed with anal cancer during a routine exam. Having completed radiation and chemotherapy, she urges people to talk to their physicians and get checked. HPV vaccine can prevent the type of HPV that causes most throat, cervical, and anal cancers. (Source: CBS News)
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Editorial Information
Editor:
Deborah L. Wexler, MD
Managing Editor:
Teresa Anderson, DDS, MPH

Consulting Editors:
Marian Deegan, JD
Courtnay Londo, MA
Jane Myers, MA, EdM  
Assistant Managing Editor:
Liv Augusta Anderson, MPP
Issue Abbreviations
AAFP: American Academy of Family Physicians
AAP: American Academy of Pediatrics
ACIP: Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices
CDC: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
FDA: Food and Drug Administration
IAC: Immunization Action Coalition
MMWR: Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report
NCIRD: National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases
VIS: Vaccine Information Statement
WHO: World Health Organization
 
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This website is supported in part by a cooperative agreement from the National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases (Grant No. 6NH23IP22550) at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in Atlanta, GA. The website content is the sole responsibility of IAC and does not necessarily represent the official views of CDC.