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Issue 1345
 

Issue 1345: January 17, 2018


TOP STORIES


WORLD NEWS


FEATURED RESOURCES


JOURNAL ARTICLES


EDUCATION AND TRAINING

 


TOP STORIES


ACIP publishes updated recommendations for prevention of hepatitis B virus infection in the United States

CDC published Prevention of Hepatitis B Virus Infection in the United States: Recommendations of the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices in the January 12 issue of MMWR Recommendations and Reports. The first three sections are reprinted below.

Summary
Hepatitis B virus (HBV) is transmitted via blood or sexual contact. Persons with chronic HBV infection are at increased risk for cirrhosis and liver cancer and require medical care. This report updates and summarizes previously published recommendations from the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) and CDC regarding the prevention of HBV infection in the United States. ACIP recommends testing all pregnant women for hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg), and testing HBsAg-positive pregnant women for hepatitis B virus deoxyribonucleic acid (HBV DNA); administration of HepB vaccine and hepatitis B immune globulin (HBIG) for infants born to HBV-infected women within 12 hours of birth, followed by completion of the vaccine series and postvaccination serologic testing; universal hepatitis B vaccination within 24 hours of birth, followed by completion of the vaccine series; and vaccination of children and adolescents aged <19 years who have not been vaccinated previously. ACIP recommends vaccination of adults at risk for HBV infection, including universal vaccination of adults in settings in which a high proportion have risk factors for HBV infection and vaccination of adults requesting protection from HBV without acknowledgment of a specific risk factor. These recommendations also provide CDC guidance for postexposure prophylaxis following occupational and other exposures. This report also briefly summarizes previously published American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases guidelines for maternal antiviral therapy to reduce perinatal HBV transmission.

Introduction
Hepatitis B virus (HBV) is transmitted through percutaneous (i.e., puncture through the skin) or mucosal (i.e., direct contact with mucous membranes) exposure to infectious blood or body fluids. HBV is highly infectious, can be transmitted in the absence of visible blood, and remains viable on environmental surfaces for at least seven days. Persons with chronic infection (e.g., those with persistent hepatitis B surface antigen [HBsAg] in the serum for at least 6 months following acute infection) serve as the main reservoir for HBV transmission.

This report summarizes and consolidates previously published recommendations from the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) and CDC. It also contains updates to recommendations for the prevention of HBV infection in the United States. A list of frequently used abbreviations is provided.

New or Updated Recommendations
The following recommendations are new or updated:

  • universal hepatitis B (HepB) vaccination within 24 hours of birth for medically stable infants weighing ≥2,000 grams;
  • testing HBsAg-positive pregnant women for hepatitis B virus deoxyribonucleic acid (HBV DNA);
  • postvaccination serologic testing for infants whose mother’s HBsAg status remains unknown indefinitely (e.g., when a parent or person with lawful custody surrenders an infant confidentially shortly after birth);
  • single-dose revaccination for infants born to HBsAg-positive women not responding to the initial vaccine series;
  • vaccination for persons with chronic liver disease (including, but not limited to, those with hepatitis C virus [HCV] infection, cirrhosis, fatty liver disease, alcoholic liver disease, autoimmune hepatitis, and an alanine aminotransferase [ALT] or aspartate aminotransferase [AST] level greater than twice the upper limit of normal); and
  • removal of permissive language for delaying the birth dose until after hospital discharge.

This report also briefly summarizes American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases (AASLD) guidelines for maternal antiviral therapy to reduce perinatal HBV transmission, published previously. Recommendations from the Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA) regarding vaccination of the immunocompromised host are published separately.

Access Prevention of Hepatitis B Virus Infection in the United States: Recommendations of the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (PDF format; 31 pages).

Related Links

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CDC updates its Vaccine Storage and Handling Toolkit

CDC’s Vaccine Storage and Handling Toolkit has just been updated for 2018. This indispensable guide reflects the best practices for vaccine storage and handling compiled from ACIP recommendations, product information from vaccine manufacturers, and scientific studies. The 2018 updates are designed to allow healthcare providers to quickly and easily access the information they need and improve best practices for vaccine storage and handling.
 
Revisions to the 2018 Toolkit include:      

  • A reorganized table of contents to ease navigation of the Toolkit  
     
  • Revised recommendations for monitoring and recording storage unit temperature, including:
     
    • All providers should use a temperature monitoring device (TMD), preferably a digital data logger (DDL). DDLs provide detailed information on all temperatures recorded at preset intervals. (See "CDC issues new requirements for VFC vaccine storage" article below for additional DDL requirements for VFC vaccine providers.)
       
    • Check and record the storage unit minimum and maximum temperatures at the start of each workday. (The previous recommendation did not include minimum and maximum temperatures.)
       
    • If a provider’s device does not display minimum and maximum temperatures, check and record the temperature a minimum of 2 times (at the start and end of the workday). This should be done even if there is a temperature alarm.
       
    • Place a temperature monitoring log sheet on or near each storage unit door and record the following information:
       
      • Minimum/maximum (“min/max”) temperature (current temperature if min/max not available)
      • Date
      • Time
      • Name or initials of person who checked and recorded the temperatures
      • Any actions taken if a temperature excursion occurred
         
  • New language allowing use of a backup battery power source in lieu of a generator 
     
  • Inclusion of a new document, Handling a Temperature Excursion in Your Vaccine Storage Unit (also available as a stand-alone document
     
  • Updated content to reflect current vaccine products on the market and an updated vaccine manufacturer/distributor list 

In addition to the Toolkit, CDC has updated and redesigned its You Call the Shots: Storage and Handling online training module. This training incorporates the updates made to the 2018 Toolkit.
 
Be sure to download and use these important new vaccine storage and handling resources from CDC. 

Related Links
 
From CDC

Vaccine storage and handling resources from IAC can be found in the 7th article in this issue: IAC Spotlight! Check out IAC's vaccine storage and handling education materials and other helpful resources.

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CDC issues new requirements for VFC vaccine storage

CDC’s Vaccines for Children (VFC) program provides vaccines at no cost to children who might not otherwise be vaccinated because of inability to pay. VFC-eligible children are entitled to receive all vaccines recommended for them by the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP). CDC buys VFC vaccines at a discount and distributes them via state/local/territorial health agencies to providers who are enrolled in the VFC program.
 
Among other program requirements, enrolled VFC providers agree to adhere to specific guidelines for safe vaccine storage and handling. Beginning January 1, 2018, these VFC storage and handling guidelines were revised to establish the following as program requirements (previously these were federal recommendations, although some areas may already have established these as state/local VFC requirements):   

  • VFC providers must use continuous temperature monitoring devices (digital data loggers or DDLs) to monitor VFC vaccine during routine onsite vaccine storage, vaccine transport, and mass vaccination clinics. 
     
  • Both primary and back-up DDLs used to monitor VFC vaccines must include the following features:
     
    • Capacity for continuous temperature monitoring and the ability to record and routinely download data
    • Temperature probe is required to be buffered* if purchased by a state/local immunization program. (The buffered probe is a recommendation for DDLs purchased by the provider.)  
      *immersed in an appropriate liquid or solid material that protects the probe from false readings resulting from sudden temperature changes when the storage unit door is opened
    • Active temperature display that can be easily read from the outside of the storage unit 
       
  • VFC providers are required to assess and record minimum and maximum storage unit temperatures at the start of each clinic day. (See additional information in article above: CDC updates its Vaccine Storage & Handling Toolkit.) 

Important note: Along with the federal requirements noted above, providers may have agreed to additional state or local immunization program requirements as part of becoming an enrolled VFC provider. These requirements may vary between state programs. Be sure to consult with your state/local/territory immunization program for more information on how to meet specific state/local/territory VFC storage and handling requirements.

Related Links

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CDC provides media advisory on current widespread influenza activity 

On January 12, CDC held an update for the media titled "CDC Update on Widespread Flu Activity." Part of the introduction from Brenda Fitzgerald, MD, director, CDC, is reprinted below.

We are currently in the midst of a very active flu season, with much of the country experiencing widespread and intense flu activity. Many of you may be have been directly impacted by this. You may have been sick with the flu yourself or caring for loved ones who are sick. I also know that many of you have received—may have received the flu vaccine this season, but you got sick anyway, or you tried to fill a prescription for medicines to treat the flu, and it was difficult to do. We are here today to discuss these issues and our latest information with you. So far this season, influenza A, H3N2, has been the most common form of influenza. These viruses are often linked to more severe illness, especially among children and people age 65 and older. When H3 viruses are predominant, we tend to have a worse flu season with more hospitalizations and more deaths. While our surveillance systems show that nationally the flu season may be peaking now, we know from past experience that it will take many more weeks for flu activity to truly slow down. 

Access the complete transcript or audio recording from this media advisory.

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CDC publishes ACIP recommendations on use of a third dose of MMR during a mumps outbreak

CDC published Recommendations of the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices for Use of a Third Dose of Mumps Virus-Containing Vaccine in Persons at Increased Risk for Mumps During an Outbreak in the January 12 issue of MMWR (pages 33–8). The first paragraph is reprinted below.

A substantial increase in the number of mumps outbreaks and outbreak-associated cases has occurred in the United States since late 2015. To address this public health problem, the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) reviewed the available evidence and determined that a third dose of measles, mumps, rubella (MMR) vaccine is safe and effective at preventing mumps. During its October 2017 meeting, ACIP recommended a third dose of a mumps virus–containing vaccine for persons previously vaccinated with 2 doses who are identified by public health authorities as being part of a group or population at increased risk for acquiring mumps because of an outbreak. The purpose of the recommendation is to improve protection of persons in outbreak settings against mumps disease and mumps-related complications. This recommendation supplements the existing ACIP recommendations for mumps vaccination.

Related Links

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FDA approves expanded pediatric age indication for Fluarix Quadrivalent influenza vaccine

On January 11, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration’s (FDA) Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research expanded the indication for Fluarix Quadrivalent (GSK) influenza vaccine to include use in people 6 months and older. Prior to this, the vaccine was only approved for use in people age 3 years and older. 

Access FDA approval letter.

Access updated Fluarix Quadrivalent package insert.

Access GSK press release.

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IAC Spotlight! Check out IAC's vaccine storage and handling education materials and other helpful resources

IAC has a number of useful materials related to vaccine storage and handling for healthcare professionals. These resources will help ensure you're doing everything you can to safeguard your vaccine supply.

IAC's Vaccine Storage and Handling handout page features the following 13 handouts:

In addition, IAC's newly revised Vaccinating Adults handbook includes a chapter on Vaccine Storage and Handling.

Finally, IAC's immunize.org website includes a Storage & Handling section under the Clinic Tools tab at the top of the home page. This page includes links to not only related IAC handouts, but also links to storage and handling resources from other organizations, including CDC, the American Academy of Pediatrics, the Alliance for Immunization in Michigan, the California Department of Public Health, vaccine manufacturers, and more.

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Association of Immunization Managers award nominations open through March 19

Each year, the Association of Immunization Managers (AIM) presents awards to its members in recognition of their outstanding initiatives, service, dedication, and leadership. The awards will be presented at the 2018 AIM Leadership in Action conference in San Diego in June. The Natalie J. Smith Award, Bull’s-Eye Awards, and Rising Star Awards have an open nomination process. For more detailed information about each award and the nomination process, click here. Nominations are due by March 19, 2018. Contact mwaterman@immunizationmanagers.org with any questions.

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IAC enrolls three new birthing institutions into its Hepatitis B Birth Dose Honor Roll; seven previously honored institutions qualify for additional years' honors

The Immunization Action Coalition (IAC) is pleased to announce that three new institutions have been accepted into its Hepatitis B Birth Dose Honor Roll. The birthing institutions are listed below with their reported hepatitis B birth dose coverage rates in parentheses.

  • Franciscan Health Lafayette East, Lafayette, IN (100%)
  • Franciscan Health–Mooresville, Mooresville, IN (97%)
  • St. Vincent Dunn Hospital, Bedford, IN (98%)

The following four institutions are being recognized for a second year:

  • Brownfield Regional Medical Center, Brownfield, TX (93%)
  • East Texas Medical Center Jacksonville, Jacksonville, TX (97%
  • RC Hospital & Clinics, Olivia, MN (93%)
  • Starr County Memorial Hospital, Rio Grande City, TX (100%)

The following institution is being recognized for a third year and fourth year:

  • Sagua Managu, Tamuning, GU (100% for both 2016 and 2017)

In addition, the following institution is being recognized for a fourth year:

  • Methodist South Hospital, Memphis, TN (98%)

Finally, the following institution qualified for a sixth and seventh time!

  • Guam Memorial Hospital Authority, Tamuning, GU (99% for both 2016 and 2017)

The Honor Roll now includes 373 birthing institutions from 39 states, Puerto Rico, and Guam. Eighty-four institutions have qualified for two years, 40 institutions have qualified three times, 14 institutions have qualified four times, 5 institutions have qualified five times, and 1 institution has qualified seven times.

The Honor Roll is a key part of IAC’s major initiative urging the nation’s hospitals to Give birth to the end of Hep B. Hospitals and birthing centers are recognized for attaining high coverage rates for administering hepatitis B vaccine at birth and meeting specific additional criteria. The initiative urges qualifying healthcare organizations to apply for the Hepatitis B Birth Dose Honor Roll online.

To be included in the Hepatitis B Birth Dose Honor Roll, a birthing institution must have: (1) reported a coverage rate of 90 percent or greater, over a 12-month period, for administering hepatitis B vaccine before hospital discharge to all newborns, including those whose parents refuse vaccination, and (2) implemented specific written policies, procedures, and protocols to protect all newborns from hepatitis B virus infection prior to hospital discharge.

Honorees are also awarded an 8.5" x 11" color certificate suitable for framing and their acceptance is announced to IAC Express’s approximately 50,000 readers.

Please visit the Hepatitis B Birth Dose Honor Roll web page that lists these institutions and their exceptional efforts to protect infants from perinatal hepatitis B transmission.

Related Links

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Voices for Vaccines releases new podcast, “HPV Vaccines, Cancers, and Cervivors"

Voices for Vaccines (VFV) has posted a new entry in its Vax Talk podcast series titled HPV Vaccines, Cancers, and Cervivors. Because it's Cervical Cancer Awareness Month, in this episode, Karen Ernst, Voices for Vaccines, and Dr. Nathan Boonstra, Blank Children's Hospital, talk to Tamika Felder about her battle with HPV-caused cervical cancer and her organization, Cervivor.


 

Voices for Vaccines is a national organization of parents and others who are dedicated to raising the level of the voices of immunization supporters. VFV invites everyone who values vaccines to become a member. Please spread the word to your friends and colleagues to join VFV!
 
Related Links

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Reminder: CDC requests nominations for its Childhood Immunization Champion Awards; submissions due by February 2

The CDC Childhood Immunization Champion Award is an annual award that recognizes individuals who make a significant contribution toward improving public health through their work in childhood immunization.
 
Each year, up to one CDC Immunization Champion from each of the 50 U.S. states, eight U.S. territories and freely associated states, and the District of Columbia will be honored. Champions can include coalition members, parent advocates, healthcare professionals (e.g., physicians, nurses, physicians’ assistants, nurse practitioners, and medical assistants), and other immunization leaders who meet the award criteria. Self-nominations are welcome, or you may submit an application for a deserving individual.

State immunization program managers, state and federal government employees of health agencies, individuals who have been affiliated with and/or employed by pharmaceutical companies, and those who have already received the award are not eligible to apply (for details, see page 3 of the nomination packet).

Awardees will be announced during National Infant Immunization Week (NIIW), which runs April 21–28 in 2018. Champions will receive a certificate of recognition, will be featured on CDC’s web site, and may be recognized by their immunization program during NIIW.

Nominations should be submitted to the immunization program manager in the state or territory where the nominee resides by February 2. Please contact your state immunization program to confirm your state’s deadline. 

Related Links

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IAC's new 142-page book, Vaccinating Adults: A Step-by-Step Guide, describes how to implement adult vaccination services in your healthcare setting and provides a review for staff who already vaccinate adults; IAC Guide available for free download or purchase

The Immunization Action Coalition (IAC) recently announced the publication of its new book, Vaccinating Adults: A Step-by-Step Guide (Guide).



This completely updated guide on adult immunization (originally published in 2004) provides easy-to-use, practical information covering important “how-to” activities to help providers enhance their existing adult immunization services or introduce them into any clinical setting, including:

  • setting up for vaccination services,
  • storing and handling vaccines,
  • deciding which people should receive which vaccines,
  • administering vaccines,
  • documenting vaccinations (including legal issues), and
  • understanding financial considerations and billing information. 

In addition, the Guide is filled with hundreds of web addresses and references to help providers stay up to date on the latest immunization information, both now and in the future.

Two options are available to obtain a copy of the updated Guide:

  • Purchase a copy
    A limited number of printed editions of this 142-page book are available for purchase at www.immunize.org/shop. The Guide’s lie-flat binding and 10 tabbed sections make it easy to locate the information being sought. Purchased copies are delivered in a box that includes Immunization Techniques: Best Practices with Infants, Children, and Adults, a 25-minute training DVD developed by the California Department of Public Health. Also included are several selected IAC print materials, such as the "Skills Checklist for Vaccine Administration," an assessment tool to assist in evaluating the skill level of staff who administer vaccines.
  • Download for free and print it yourself
    The entire Guide is available to download/print free of charge at www.immunize.org/guide. The downloaded version is suitable for double-sided printing. Options are available online to download the entire book or selected chapters.

The development of the Guide was supported by the National Vaccine Program Office (NVPO) and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Expert staff from both agencies also provided early technical review of the content.

The Guide is a uniquely valuable resource to assist providers in increasing adult immunization rates. Be sure to get a copy today!

Related Links

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WORLD NEWS


WHO reports on global influenza virus surveillance in its Weekly Epidemiological Record

WHO published Detection of influenza viruses by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction: WHO external quality assessment programme summary analysis, 2017 in the January 12 issue of its Weekly Epidemiological Record. A selection from the "Introduction" section is reprinted below.

Global influenza virus surveillance has been conducted through the WHO Global Influenza Surveillance and Response System (GISRS) for over 60 years. Currently there are 144 institutions in 114 WHO Member States recognized by WHO as National Influenza Centres (NICs)....

Due to the continuous evolution of seasonal influenza viruses causing annual epidemics worldwide, together with the pandemic potential of non-seasonal influenza A viruses, assurance of the quality and capacity of laboratory diagnostics is essential. The WHO external quality assessment programme (EQAP) for the detection of influenza viruses by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) was initiated in 2007, after the influenza A (H5N1) outbreaks in Asia, to assess the ability of NICs to detect influenza A (H5) viruses, considered a potential pandemic threat.


Related Link

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FEATURED RESOURCES


Families Fighting Flu’s "Do You Know the Flu?" toolkit for pediatric healthcare professionals now also available in Spanish

This fall, Families Fighting Flu partnered with the National Association of Pediatric Nurse Practitioners and HealthyWomen to develop a "Do You Know the Flu?" toolkit for pediatric healthcare professionals in an effort to increase annual flu vaccination rates in the pediatric population. This toolkit is now available in Spanish as well as English, and includes the following educational resources:
  • A personal note from a pediatric nurse practitioner that highlights why healthcare professionals are so important for flu prevention
  • Family stories that illustrate just how serious flu can be for children, even healthy children
  • Benefits of flu vaccination to share with your patients
  • A Do You Know the Flu? quiz to test your flu knowledge
  • Key flu messages for patient/parent conversations
  • A conversation road map on how to address tough flu-related questions
  • Flu facts
  • A public service announcement called Play It Safe
  • Resources to share with parents, including two infographics

Access Do You Know the Flu? In English.
Access Do You Know the Flu? In Spanish.

Related Link

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CDC updates measles and mumps chapters of its Manual for Surveillance of Vaccine-Preventable Diseases

On January 5, CDC updated the measles and mumps chapters of its Manual for Surveillance of Vaccine-Preventable Diseases.

The Manual for the Surveillance of Vaccine-Preventable Diseases provides current guidelines for those directly involved in surveillance of vaccine-preventable diseases (VPD), especially personnel at the local health departments. 

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Influenza is spreading and serious; please keep vaccinating your patients

According to CDC, during the week of December 31, 2017–January 6, 2018, influenza activity increased in the United States. The geographic spread of influenza in 49 states was reported as widespread; Guam and one state reported regional activity; the District of Columbia reported local activity; the U.S. Virgin Islands reported sporadic activity; and Puerto Rico did not report. Seven influenza-associated pediatric deaths were reported.

Influenza vaccination is recommended for everyone six months of age and older. If you don't provide influenza vaccination in your clinic, please recommend vaccination to your patients and refer them to a clinic or pharmacy that provides vaccines or to the HealthMap Vaccine Finder to locate sites near their workplaces or homes that offer influenza vaccination services.

Following is a list of resources related to influenza disease and vaccination for healthcare professionals and the public:

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Hepatitis B Foundation releases new video titled "Espi's Story" in its storytelling project #justB

The Hepatitis B Foundation continues its storytelling campaign: #justB: Real People Sharing their Stories of Hepatitis B. 

Watch the January video, Espi's Story, about a 64-year-old woman who educated—and empowered—herself about her treatment options after being diagnosed with chronic hepatitis B virus infection.

Related Links

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JOURNAL ARTICLES


Study finds that more than 40% of healthcare personnel worked while sick with an influenza-like illness

On November 1, the American Journal of Infection Control published an article by Sophia Chiu et al. titled Working with influenza-like illness: Presenteeism among U.S. health care personnel during the 2014–2015 influenza season. Three sections of the abstract are reprinted below.

Background
Health care personnel (HCP) working while experiencing influenza-like illness (ILI) contribute to influenza transmission in health care settings. Studies focused on certain HCP occupations or work settings have demonstrated that some HCP often continue to work while ill.

Results
Overall, 414 (21.6%) HCP reported ILI, and 183 (41.4%) reported working with ILI (median, 3 days; range, 0–30 days). Pharmacists (67.2%) and physicians (63.2%) had the highest frequency of working with ILI. By work setting, hospital-based HCP had the highest frequency of working with ILI (49.3%). The most common reasons for working while ill included still being able to perform job duties and not feeling bad enough to miss work. Among HCP at long-term care facilities, the most common reason was inability to afford lost pay.

Conclusions
More than 40% of HCP with ILI work while ill. To reduce HCP-associated influenza transmission, potential interventions could target HCP misconceptions about working while ill and paid sick leave policies.


Access the complete article in PDF format: Working with influenza-like illness: Presenteeism among US health care personnel during the 2014–2015 influenza season.

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EDUCATION AND TRAINING


VICNetwork webinar "Communicating about Maternal Immunization" scheduled for January 30

On January 30 at 1:00 p.m. (ET), the California Immunization Coalition's VICNetwork will sponsor a webinar titled "Communicating about Maternal Immunization." A description of the session follows:

Pregnant women need vaccines to protect them and their babies against influenza and pertussis. Speakers will give an update on CDC's maternal vaccination recommendations and maternal vaccination campaign. The webinar will also discuss strategies that programs can use to reach pregnant women. 

Speakers include David Kim, MD, deputy associate director for Adult Immunizations, Immunization Services Division, National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases (NCIRD), CDC; and Ashley Brooks, MPH, health communication specialist, Health Communication Science Office, NCIRD, CDC.

Registration information

The VICNetwork is a nationwide "virtual immunization community" of health educators, public health communicators, and others who promote immunizations to exchange and share resources, materials, and the best practices.

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Registration is open for the Epidemiology & Prevention of Vaccine-Preventable Diseases ("The Pink Book") course in Utah, March 8–9


CDC faculty from its National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases will present a comprehensive review of immunization principles and recommendations for vaccines for vaccine-preventable diseases in a 2-day Epidemiology and Prevention of Vaccine Preventable Diseases ("The Pink Book") course in West Jordan, UT, on March 8–9. This continuing education opportunity will be hosted by the Immunization Group of the Utah Public Health Association.

Registration information

Questions can be directed to stephanie.hart@upha.org or 385-468-4141.

Related Link

Registration is open for the Epidemiology & Prevention of Vaccine-Preventable Diseases ("The Pink Book") course in West Virginia, April 10–11

The Mountaineer Health Initiative and WVU Cancer Institute will co-host the Epidemiology and Prevention of Vaccine Preventable Diseases ("The Pink Book") course on April 10–11 at the Morgantown Marriott at Waterfront Place, Morgantown, WV. Faculty from CDC's National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases will provide an overview of the principles of vaccination, general recommendations and best practice guidelines for immunization, vaccine safety, specific information about vaccine-preventable diseases and the vaccines that prevent them, and current issues related to immunization in this 2-day course.

Registration information

Related Link

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VICNetwork webinar about HPV and oral cancer prevention postponed to February 21

Due to unforeseen circumstances, the California Immunization Coalition's VICNetwork webinar titled "An Interprofessional Approach to HPV and Oropharyngeal Cancer Prevention Education" was postponed from January 8 to February 21, 2:00 p.m. (ET). The objectives of the course are:

  • Describe action steps to build a partnership with dental providers on HPV education and the importance of HPV vaccination
  • Identify the relationship between oral HPV infections and head and neck cancers
  • Discuss ways that dental professionals can include HPV education in patient visits, including an overview of helpful resources
  • Determine the effectiveness of an HPV prevention campaign via interprofessional education and consider strategies for sustainability

Registration information

The VICNetwork is a nationwide "virtual immunization community" of health educators, public health communicators, and others who promote immunizations to exchange and share resources, materials, and the best practices.

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About IAC Express
The Immunization Action Coalition welcomes redistribution of this issue of IAC Express or selected articles. When you do so, please add a note that the Immunization Action Coalition is the source of the material and provide a link to this issue.

If you have trouble receiving or displaying IAC Express messages, visit our online help section.

IAC Express is supported in part by Grant No. 6NH23IP922550 from the National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases, CDC. Its contents are solely the responsibility of IAC and do not necessarily represent the official views of CDC. IAC Express is also supported by educational grants from the following companies: AstraZeneca, Inc.; Merck Sharp & Dohme Corp.; Pfizer, Inc.; and Sanofi Pasteur.

IAC Express Disclaimer
ISSN: 1526-1786
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Video of the Week
PedsGeekMD: Influenza Vaccine: Dr. Nathan Boonstra, pediatrician, Blank Children's Hospital, discusses the three biggest reasons why it is especially important that kids need flu shots every year. Kids have an even higher risk than adults of catching flu, immunizing against flu saves kids' lives, and vaccinating kids helps protect older people from getting sick from the flu.
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Editorial Information
Editor:
Deborah L. Wexler, MD
Managing Editor:
Teresa Anderson, DDS, MPH

Consulting Editors:
Marian Deegan, JD
Jane Myers, EdM

Assistant Managing Editor:
Liv Augusta Anderson, MPP
Issue Abbreviations
AAFP: American Academy of Family Physicians
AAP: American Academy of Pediatrics
ACIP: Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices
CDC: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
FDA: Food and Drug Administration
IAC: Immunization Action Coalition
MMWR: Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report
NCIRD: National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases
VIS: Vaccine Information Statement
WHO: World Health Organization
 
 
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Immunization Action Coalition  •  2550 University Avenue West  •  Suite 415 North  •  Saint Paul, Minnesota  •  55114
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This website is supported in part by a cooperative agreement from the National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases (Grant No. 6NH23IP22550) at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in Atlanta, GA. The website content is the sole responsibility of IAC and does not necessarily represent the official views of CDC.