Issue 1359: April 11, 2018


TOP STORIES


IAC HANDOUTS


VACCINE INFORMATION STATEMENTS


WORLD NEWS


FEATURED RESOURCES

 
JOURNAL ARTICLES AND NEWSLETTERS


EDUCATION AND TRAINING

  
CONFERENCES AND MEETINGS

 


TOP STORIES


IAC’s laminated U.S. immunization schedules for children/teens and adults can be ordered now; available for shipping the week of April 16

IAC's laminated versions of the 2018 U.S. child/teen immunization schedule and the 2018 U.S. adult immunization schedule are covered with a tough, washable coating; they will stand up to a year's worth of use in every area of your healthcare setting where immunizations are given. Both schedules are eight pages (i.e., four double-sided pages) and are folded to measure 8.5" x 11". 

Adult Laminated Immunization Schedules

Adult Laminated Immunization Schedules

Laminated schedules are printed in color for easy reading, come complete with essential tables and footnotes, and include contraindications and precautions—a feature that will help you make an on-the-spot determination about the safety of vaccinating patients of any age.

PRICING
1–4 copies: $7.50 each
5–19 copies: $5.50 each
20–99 copies: $4.50 each
100–499 copies: $4.00 each
500–999 copies: $3.50 each

For quotes on customizing or placing orders for 1,000 copies or more, call (651) 647-9009 or email admininfo@immunize.org.

You can access specific information on both schedules, view images of both, order online, or download an order form at the Shop IAC: Laminated Schedules web page.

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Reminder! National Infant Immunization Week is April 21–28; many resources available to help you plan activities

National Infant Immunization Week (NIIW), from April 21–28 this year, will soon be here. NIIW is an annual observance to highlight the importance of protecting infants from vaccine-preventable diseases and celebrate the achievements of immunization programs and their partners in promoting healthy communities. 

CDC's 2018 NIIW Digital Media Toolkit is now available for planning and implementing your NIIW activities. The media toolkit contains a range of suggested social media activities, including digital graphics and messaging, as well as tools for planning and developing promotional materials for the press and public service announcements.




Visit CDC's updated NIIW website to find promotional and educational materials to help you plan your NIIW activities, and tailor them to the needs of your community.

CDC would like to hear from organizations planning a 2018 NIIW activity. Please complete the NIIW Activity Form so others can learn what you're doing to educate and inspire parents and providers to protect infants and toddlers from vaccine-preventable diseases. If you're looking for ideas, you can access guidance on CDC's Planning Your NIIW web page.

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The agenda for the National Immunization Conference (NIC), May 15–17, has recently been posted. NIC, which will be held at the Hilton Hotel in Atlanta, will bring together more than 1,500 local, state, federal, and private-sector immunization stakeholders and partners to explore science, policy, education, and planning issues related to immunization and vaccine-preventable diseases.

View the agenda for the conference.

This three-day conference will include the following session tracks:

  • Adult Immunizations
  • Epidemiology and Surveillance
  • Childhood/Adolescent Immunization 
  • Immunization Information Systems
  • Programmatic Issues
  • Health and Risk Communications

Register for the conference. Registration will close on April 20.

Visit the National Immunization Conference web page for information about conference and hotel registration, fees, and more.

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Haiti immunization campaign aims to vaccinate 2.3 million children with the support of Pan American Health Organization

Haiti has launched a large-scale diphtheria immunization campaign to vaccinate 2.3 million children from one to 15 years old. The Pan American Health Organization (PAHO), along with UNICEF and other partners, will assist Haiti's Ministry of Public Health and Population in this widespread effort in areas where diphtheria cases have already been confirmed or suspected. So far, Haiti has reported 14 confirmed cases, 48 probable cases, and six deaths, mostly among children younger than 15 years old, since the beginning of 2018. For this immunization campaign, 6,300 trained vaccinators have been mobilized in 3,181 teams.

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IAC Spotlight! IAC updates its entire Clinic Tools web section, a one-stop source of practical information for immunization providers from IAC and its partners

IAC's Clinic Tools web section on immunize.org is a one-stop source of practice information for immunization providers. Its main page has been recently updated to make it easier than ever to find educational materials and other resources and tools you need from IAC and partner organizations. Clicking on "Clinic Tools" in the light gray bar at the top of the immunize.org website will bring you to this web section.

On the Clinic Tools web section's main page, you can access IAC and others' educational resources belonging to the following categories:

The Clinic Tools web section main page also provides easy-to-access links to many other valuable resources, including IAC publications, partner resources, and other related materials from IAC. 

Visit the Clinic Tools web section today to see how easy it is to find what you need!

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IAC updates its PowerPoint slide set “Give Birth to the End of Hep B: What Hospitals Need to Do to Protect Newborns” to include updated ACIP recommendations for the hepatitis B vaccine birth dose

IAC has updated its PowerPoint slide set Give Birth to the End of Hep B: What Hospitals Need to Do to Protect Newborns to include the updated ACIP recommendation that the hepatitis B vaccine birth dose be given within 24 hours of birth. Previously, CDC recommended the dose be given prior to hospital discharge.

To obtain this PowerPoint slide set, go to IAC's PowerPoint Slide Sets web page. Just below the presentation's tile and description, click on "Request the PowerPoint slide set" and IAC will email the PowerPoint presentation to you. Once you have received the presentation, you can edit and use it as you see fit.

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IAC's new 142-page book, Vaccinating Adults: A Step-by-Step Guide, describes how to implement adult vaccination services in your healthcare setting and provides a review for staff who already vaccinate adults; IAC Guide available for free download

The Immunization Action Coalition (IAC) recently announced the publication of its new book, Vaccinating Adults: A Step-by-Step Guide (Guide).



This completely updated guide on adult immunization (originally published in 2004) provides easy-to-use, practical information covering important “how-to” activities to help providers enhance their existing adult immunization services or introduce them into any clinical setting, including:

  • setting up for vaccination services,
  • storing and handling vaccines,
  • deciding which people should receive which vaccines,
  • administering vaccines,
  • documenting vaccinations (including legal issues), and
  • understanding financial considerations and billing information. 

In addition, the Guide is filled with hundreds of web addresses and references to help providers stay up to date on the latest immunization information, both now and in the future.

The entire Guide is available to download/print free of charge at www.immunize.org/guide. The downloaded version is suitable for double-sided printing. Options are available online to download the entire book or selected chapters. The development of the Guide was supported by the National Vaccine Program Office (NVPO) and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Expert staff from both agencies also provided early technical review of the content.

The Guide is a uniquely valuable resource to assist providers in increasing adult immunization rates. Be sure to get a copy today!

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IAC HANDOUTS


IAC updates and posts its very popular “Screening Checklist for Contraindications to Vaccines for Adults"

IAC has updated and posted its very popular Screening Checklist for Contraindications to Vaccines for Adults. This checklist was changed to update the information regarding influenza vaccine and egg allergy, to use the new acronym (ZVL) when referencing live zoster vaccine, and to update several URLs.

Related Link

IAC's Handouts for Patients & Staff web section offers healthcare professionals and the public more than 250 FREE English-language handouts (many also available in translation), which we encourage website users to print out, copy, and distribute widely.

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IAC revises “Healthcare Personnel Vaccination Recommendations”

IAC recently revised Healthcare Personnel Vaccination Recommendations to insert information on the use of the newest hepatitis B vaccine (Heplisav-B, Dynavax) within the recommendations.

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IAC posts updated “Current Dates of Vaccine Information Statements (VISs)" as well as “You Must Give Your Patients Vaccine Information Statements (VISs)—It's Federal Law!"

IAC has recently revised Current Dates of Vaccine Information Statements (VISs) as well as You Must Give Your Patients Vaccine Information Statements (VISs)—It's Federal Law! to update the date for the VIS to be used for anthrax vaccine.

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IAC revises "Before you vaccinate adults, consider their "H-A-L-O"!" to help identify which groups of adults need certain vaccines

IAC has revised Before you vaccinate adults, consider their "H-A-L-O"! to help identify which groups of adults need certain vaccines. The age of adults needing the zoster vaccine was changed from 60 to 50 years old.

Related Link

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IAC updates its easy-to-read handout for adults titled "Protect yourself from shingles . . . Get vaccinated!"

IAC updated its easy-to-read handout for adults titled Protect yourself from shingles . . . Get vaccinated! to change the age at which all adults need zoster vaccine from 60 to 50 and to include the recently licensed 2-dose zoster vaccine, Shingrix (GlaxoSmithKline).

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VACCINE INFORMATION STATEMENTS


IAC posts new and updated Spanish translations of VISs for zoster recombinant and zoster live vaccines, respectively; Spanish-language RTF files also available

IAC recently posted the Spanish translations of the VISs for the zoster recombinant vaccine (Shingrix, GlaxoSmithKline) and the zoster live vaccine (Zostavax, Merck). The Spanish translation of the zoster recombinant vaccine is new and the translation of the zoster live vaccine was updated.

IAC also posted the Spanish version of the zoster VISs in rich text format (RTF). RTF files are intended for use in electronic systems, such as electronic medical records, immunization information systems, or other electronic databases. CDC supplies RTF files of the English-language VISs, and IAC provides Spanish RTF files of VISs for each routinely recommended vaccine.

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IAC posts updated Spanish translations of VISs for MMR, MMRV, and varicella, as well as RTF files in Spanish 

IAC recently posted the Spanish translations of the VISs for measles, mumps, rubella (MMR); measles, mumps, rubella, and varicella (MMRV); and varicella in both PDF and RTF formats.

IAC also posted the Spanish version of the zoster VISs in rich text format (RTF). RTF files are intended for use in electronic systems, such as electronic medical records, immunization information systems, or other electronic databases. CDC supplies RTF files of the English-language VISs, and IAC provides Spanish RTF files of VISs for each routinely recommended vaccine.

Related Links

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WORLD NEWS


WHO publishes "Epidemic meningitis control in countries of the African meningitis belt, 2017" in this week's Weekly Epidemiological Record

The World Health Organization (WHO) published Epidemic meningitis control in countries of the African meningitis belt, 2017 in the April 6 issue of the Weekly Epidemiological Record (pages 173–184). The first two paragraphs of the article are reprinted below.

Background
The main pathogen responsible for epidemic bacterial meningitis is Neisseria meningitidis (N.m.). Of the 13 subtypes or serogroups of N.m. identified, 4 (N.m. A, B, C and W) are recognized to be the main causes of epidemics; occasional outbreaks are also caused by N.m. X and Y. Meningococcal meningitis cases occur worldwide. However, large, recurring epidemics affect an extensive region of sub-Saharan Africa known as the “meningitis belt” which comprises 26 countries from Senegal in the west to Ethiopia in the east. In this area, outbreaks occur during the dry “epidemic” season, usually covering the first half of the year. Outbreaks caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae (Spn) have also been reported in the region, although less frequent and less extensive.


Meningococcal A conjugate vaccine mass preventive campaigns
Before 2010, serogroup A was responsible for the large majority of epidemics. Starting in 2010, a meningococcal A conjugate vaccine (MACV) was introduced progressively to epidemic-prone areas in countries of the African meningitis belt through preventive mass vaccination campaigns. This has dramatically reduced the number of N.m. A cases, and eliminated N.m. A epidemics in these areas.

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FEATURED RESOURCES


CDC updates its 1918 flu pandemic commemoration resources web page with new resources and event listings, including a flu pandemic symposium scheduled for May 7

CDC has updated its 1918 Commemoration Resources for Partners web page with new resources that include newsletter and social media messages to share, key messages for partners, a historical image gallery, and other resources. The web page also features a listing of commemoration dates and events.

One of the events listed on this page is a symposium titled "100 years of Influenza Pandemics and Practice: 1918–2018," presented by CDC and Emory University's Rollins School of Public Health. At the symposium, which will be held on May 7 from 8:30 a.m.–5:30 p.m. (ET) at the Rollins School of Public Health Auditorium, experts from academia and government will convene to discuss and debate current pandemic influenza threats as well as the future of pandemic preparedness and influenza prevention and control. The symposium is free but requires registration.  

Register for the 1918 Pandemic Flu Symposium.

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CDC updates chapter on mumps in its Manual for the Surveillance of Vaccine-Preventable Diseases

CDC has recently updated the chapter on mumps in its Manual for the Surveillance of Vaccine-Preventable Diseases. CDC's description of this manual appears below.

The Manual for the Surveillance of Vaccine-Preventable Diseases provides current guidelines for those directly involved in surveillance of vaccine-preventable diseases (VPD), especially personnel at the local health departments. For each of the vaccine-preventable diseases, this manual includes a chapter describing the importance of rapid case identification; the importance of surveillance; disease reduction goals; case definitions (including clinical description and case classifications); epidemiologically important data to be collected during case investigation; activities for enhancing surveillance; activities for case investigation; and activities for outbreak control. Other chapters include information on surveillance indicators; surveillance data analyses; enhancing surveillance; laboratory support for surveillance; and reporting adverse events following vaccination. In addition, the manual includes a section reserved for insertion of state-specific guidance for VPD surveillance, as well as extensive appendices.


Flu vaccination still recommended as long as influenza viruses are circulating

CDC has reported in its Weekly U.S. Influenza Surveillance Report, FluView, that as of the week ending March 31, influenza activity continued to decrease in the United States, although widespread activity was reported by 11 states (California, Connecticut, Delaware, Maryland, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, New York, Ohio, Rhode Island, Virginia, and Wisconsin). With five additional pediatric deaths reported, the total number of pediatric deaths since October 1, 2017 is now 142.

Influenza vaccination is recommended for everyone six months of age and older. If you don't provide influenza vaccination in your clinic, please recommend vaccination to your patients and refer them to a clinic or pharmacy that provides vaccines or to the HealthMap Vaccine Finder to locate sites near their workplaces or homes that offer influenza vaccination services.

Following is a list of resources related to influenza disease and vaccination for healthcare professionals and the public:

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JOURNAL ARTICLES AND NEWSLETTERS


March issue of CDC's Immunization Works newsletter now available

CDC recently released the March issue of its monthly newsletter Immunization Works. The newsletter offers the immunization community information about current topics. The information is in the public domain and can be reproduced and circulated widely.

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Pediatrics publishes study on pediatric deaths from influenza in the U.S. from 2010–16

Pediatrics published Influenza-Associated Pediatric Deaths in the United States, 2010–2016, by M. Shang, et al., in its April 2018 issue. The "Conclusions" section of the abstract is reprinted below.

CONCLUSIONS
Each year, influenza-associated pediatric deaths are reported. Young children have the highest death rates, especially infants aged <6 months. Increasing vaccination among children, pregnant women, and caregivers of infants may reduce influenza-associated pediatric deaths.


Read the entire article: Influenza-Associated Pediatric Deaths in the United States, 2010–2016.

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EDUCATION AND TRAINING


Register now for webinar on April 18 titled “Promoting Vaccine Confidence: A New Approach to Vaccine Hesitancy"; continuing education credit available
 
Michigan State University and the Michigan Department of Health and Human Services are hosting a webinar titled Promoting Vaccine Confidence: A New Approach to Vaccine Hesitancy on April 18 at 12:00 p.m. (ET). The webinar will focus on the following objectives:
  • Discuss vaccine hesitancy
  • Review communication strategies to promote vaccine confidence
  • Discuss common concerns surrounding vaccination
  • Identify resources to build vaccine confidence

A free CME credit will be available upon completion of an online survey following the webinar.

View the flyer for additional information about the target audience, speakers, and CME credit.

Register (required) by April 16.

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Hep B United, National Viral Hepatitis Roundtable, and the World Hepatitis Alliance present April 19 webinar on NOHep’s campaign to eliminate viral hepatitis globally by 2030

Hep B United, National Viral Hepatitis Roundtable, and the World Hepatitis Alliance will present a webinar titled The NOHep Fight for Elimination on April 19 at 1:00 p.m. (ET). The webinar will discuss the global threat presented by viral hepatitis and will provide information on NOHep’s campaign to eliminate viral hepatitis by 2030 through a global network of governments, healthcare professionals, and the hepatitis community.

Register for the webinar.

Related Links

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NFID and ACHA host webinar on increasing influenza immunization rates among college students in U.S. on April 30

On April 30 at 12:00 p.m. (ET), the National Foundation for Infectious Diseases (NFID) and the American College Health Association (ACHA) will present a webinar titled Increasing Influenza Immunization Rates among College Students. William Schaffner, MD, NFID's medical director, will moderate the webinar.

Pre-register (required) and view webinar information.
 

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Register now: Arkansas Immunization Action Coalition will hold HPV summit for medical and dental professionals on May 4 in Little Rock 

The Arkansas Immunization Action Coalition will hold an HPV summit for medical and dental professionals on May 4 from 9:00–4:00 p.m. (CDT) at the Hilton Garden Inn in Little Rock. It Takes a Village to Vaccinate: HPV Summit for Medical and Dental Professionals will highlight the importance of the HPV vaccine for cancer prevention. The registration deadline is April 30 and capacity is limited.  

View the agenda and information regarding contact hour credits.

Register for the summit.

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About IAC Express
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IAC Express is supported in part by Grant No. 6NH23IP922550 from the National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases, CDC. Its contents are solely the responsibility of IAC and do not necessarily represent the official views of CDC. IAC Express is also supported by educational grants from the following companies: AstraZeneca, Inc.; Merck Sharp & Dohme Corp.; Pfizer, Inc.; and Sanofi Pasteur.

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About IZ Express

IZ Express is supported in part by Grant No. 1NH23IP922654 from CDC’s National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases. Its contents are solely the responsibility of Immunize.org and do not necessarily represent the official views of CDC.IZ Express DisclaimerISSN 2771-8085

Editorial Information

  • Editor-in-Chief
    Kelly L. Moore, MD, MPH
  • Managing Editor
    John D. Grabenstein, RPh, PhD
  • Associate Editor
    Sharon G. Humiston, MD, MPH
  • Writer/Publication Coordinator
    Taryn Chapman, MS
    Courtnay Londo, MA
  • Style and Copy Editor
    Marian Deegan, JD
  • Web Edition Managers
    Arkady Shakhnovich
    Jermaine Royes
  • Contributing Writer
    Laurel H. Wood, MPA
  • Technical Reviewer
    Kayla Ohlde

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