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Issue 1411
Issue 1411: February 13, 2019


TOP STORIES


IAC HANDOUTS


OFFICIAL RELEASES AND ANNOUNCEMENTS


FEATURED RESOURCES


JOURNAL ARTICLES AND NEWSLETTERS


EDUCATION AND TRAINING


CONFERENCES AND MEETINGS

   


TOP STORIES


MMWR publishes “ACIP Recommended Immunization Schedule for Children and Adolescents Aged 18 Years or Younger—U.S., 2019"

On February 7, CDC published ACIP Recommended Immunization Schedule for Children and Adolescents Aged 18 Years or Younger—U.S., 2019 in MMWR (pages 112–114).   

Each year, ACIP updates the immunization schedules to reflect current recommendations for licensed vaccines. In October 2018, ACIP voted to approve the recommended immunization schedules for 2019. The birth through 18 years recommended schedule has been approved by CDC, AAP, AAFP, and ACOG.

Changes in the 2019 child/adolescent immunization schedule include new or revised ACIP recommendations for hepatitis A vaccine, hepatitis B vaccine, influenza vaccine, and Tdap vaccine, as well as clarification of the recommendations for inactivated poliovirus vaccine.

The 2019 immunization child/adolescent schedule contains numerous, detailed recommendation changes. In addition, the schedule format has been completely redesigned. For all details regarding the content and redesign of the 2019 schedule, view the MMWR article.

You can also view these changes on CDC's Immunization Schedule Changes web page. 

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MMWR publishes "ACIP Recommended Immunization Schedule for Adults Aged 19 Years or Older—U.S., 2019" 

On February 7, CDC published ACIP Recommended Immunization Schedule for Adults Aged 19 Years or Older—U.S., 2019 (pages 115–118).

Each year, ACIP updates the immunization schedules to reflect current recommendations for licensed vaccines. In October 2018, ACIP voted to approve the recommended immunization schedules for 2019. The recommended schedule for adults has been approved by CDC, AAP, AAFP, ACOG, and ACNM.

Vaccine changes in the 2019 immunization schedule for adults aged 19 years and old include new or revised ACIP recommendations for influenza, hepatitis B, and hepatitis A. The MMWR article enumerates the details and changes in these recommendations. In addition, the 2019 schedule has been completely redesigned.

For all details regarding the changes in content and redesign of the 2019 adult schedule, view the MMWR article

You can also view the changes in the adult schedule on CDC's Immunization Schedule Changes web page. 

Related Links

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CDC redesigns its "Immunization Schedules" web section to provide easier access to information and schedule-related resources

CDC has substantially redesigned its Immunization Schedules web section to provide easier access to information and schedule-related resources for healthcare providers, parents, and other adults. The following web pages are new to this CDC web section:

Visit the CDC Immunization Schedules web section to explore the new design and to access the information you are seeking.

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Measles outbreak continues to grow in Washington State; 53 cases confirmed

The measles outbreak in Clark County, Washington State, is continuing. As of February 10, Clark County Public Health reported 53 confirmed cases and one case in King County, Washington. Clark County Public Health also reported that as of December 31, 2018, only 78% of Clark County 6- to 18-year-olds and only 81% of 1- to 5-year-olds had received the age-appropriate number of doses of measles vaccine.

According to CDC's Measles Cases and Outbreaks web page, 79 cases of measles have been confirmed in ten states between January 1 to January 31.

Access up-to-date information about the Washington State outbreak as well as a Measles Outbreak Toolkit for the public from the State of Washington Department of Health

Related Links

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U.S. Surgeon General featured in video on the importance of getting vaccinated to protect yourself and others against measles

The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services has posted a video of U.S. Surgeon General Vice Admiral Jerome Adams, MD, MPH, speaking about the importance of getting vaccinated against measles. In this 3-minute video, Dr. Adams describes the extreme contagion of measles, the symptoms and complications of the disease, and the importance of getting vaccinated with the safe, effective MMR to protect yourself and your family against the disease. 

View the 3-minute video: Surgeon General Jerome Adams: Protect against the Measles 

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Dr. Paul Offit responds to measles outbreaks with Medscape commentary titled "Measles: Will It Take a Death to Get Kids Vaccinated?"

Dr. Paul Offit, director of the Vaccine Education Center at the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, presented a Medscape video commentary in response to the recent measles outbreaks in Clark County, Washington, and elsewhere in the U.S. The commentary, published February 5, is titled "Measles: Will It Take a Death to Get Kids Vaccinated?" An excerpt from his commentary is reprinted below.

...When do we get to the tipping point where we stand up for children whose parents are making bad decisions that are putting children at unnecessary risk? I think the answer to that question is: when children start to die. With measles, death typically begins to occur when you have about 1000–2000 infections, so that is what will change things. Children will have to die to finally get our attention that we need to stand up for these children. These parents do not have the inalienable right as citizens to allow their children to catch and transmit a potentially fatal infection... 

View the video (2:24 minutes) and commentary transcript.

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Influenza remains widespread; CDC reports 4 additional pediatric deaths from influenza in the U.S. 

Influenza remains widespread, and CDC has reported 4 additional pediatric deaths from influenza in the U.S. this season, for a total of 28. Last season, there was a record-setting number of pediatric deaths in the U.S. (185). Be sure to protect all your patients for whom vaccination is recommended.

CDC stated in its Weekly U.S. Influenza Surveillance Report, FluView, that during the week ending February 2, the geographic spread of influenza in Puerto Rico and 47 states was reported as widespread; two states reported regional activity; the District of Columbia and one state reported local activity; the U.S. Virgin Islands experienced sporadic activity; and Guam did not report.

Influenza vaccination is recommended for everyone six months of age and older. If you don't provide influenza vaccination in your clinic, please recommend vaccination to your patients and refer them to a clinic or pharmacy that provides vaccines or to the HealthMap Vaccine Finder to locate sites near their workplaces or homes that offer influenza vaccination services.

Following is a list of resources related to influenza disease and vaccination for healthcare professionals and the public:

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IAC Spotlight! Six new "Handouts" categories developed, making IAC's ready-to-print educational materials even easier to locate

IAC has reorganized its Handouts web section by adding six new categories to its list of topics. Now, more easily than ever, you can locate vaccine-preventable disease educational materials for yourself, your staff, and your patients. 

New Categories in "Handouts"

The most popular categories in "Handouts" 

You can also search for what you need by the following categories:

All of IAC’s handouts are ready to print, copy, and distribute widely! Technical accuracy has been confirmed by immunization experts at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

As always, you can find over 250 IAC-created educational materials in the Handouts section of immunize.org, indexed by topic, vaccine, and language.

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Vaccinate Your Family releases special report on the state of our nation’s “ImmUnion” and shares it with members of Congress

Vaccinate Your Family: The Next Generation of Every Child By Two (VYF) released their third annual State of the ImmUnion (SOTI) report, titled 2019 State of the ImmUnion: A Report on Vaccine-Preventable Diseases in the U.S. on Monday, February 11.



The report presents an overview of the current state of vaccine-preventable diseases in the U.S. and offers members of Congress ways to help ensure our country is stronger and more resilient in the face of emerging health threats. 

Related Links

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January's Technically Speaking column by IAC executive director Dr. Deborah Wexler is titled "Want to Avoid Vaccination Errors? These Print Materials and Slide Sets Will Help You!"

Technically Speaking is a monthly column written by IAC executive director Dr. Deborah Wexler for Vaccine Update for Healthcare Providers, a monthly e-newsletter from the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP). The column covers practical topics in immunization, such as vaccine administration, immunization scheduling, vaccine storage and handling, and vaccine recommendations.

January's column is titled Want to Avoid Vaccination Errors? These Print Materials and Slide Sets Will Help You! and is reprinted below.

Want to Avoid Vaccination Errors? These Print Materials and Slide Sets Will Help You!
Published January 2019

The Immunization Action Coalition (IAC) receives hundreds of emails and phone calls from healthcare professionals each month, many of which describe medical errors related to vaccination. Unfortunately, the availability of more vaccine products and an increasingly complex immunization schedule increase the likelihood of errors.

Over the past four years, IAC received more than 1,500 questions about medical errors related to vaccination, including errors in vaccine storage and handling, administration, scheduling, and documentation. Commonly reported errors include violations of minimum intervals and age, incorrect scheduling of live virus vaccines, administration of the wrong vaccine (or one not recommended/licensed for use in the patient), providing a pediatric dose to an adult or vice versa, using the wrong route or site for administration, and using expired or improperly reconstituted vaccine.

The result of such errors can be serious, including harm to the vaccinee from a side effect, inadequate disease protection, inconvenience to the parent/patient, unreimbursed cost to the provider, possible feelings of ill will or loss of trust in the provider, and possible negative media publicity. Avoiding such errors benefits everyone. Fortunately, there are many resources to help you avoid vaccination errors, including the following:

IAC ready-to-print educational materials (CDC-reviewed)

See all IAC ready-to-print educational materials (CDC-reviewed) on the following topics:

IAC slide sets for your review or use when giving presentations

To order this slide set in PowerPoint format, visit IAC’s PowerPoint web page.

To order this slide set in PowerPoint format, visit IAC’s PowerPoint web page.

To order this slide set in PowerPoint format, visit IAC’s PowerPoint web page

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Nominations deadline for the National Adult and Influenza Immunization Summit Excellence Awards is February 15

The National Adult and Influenza Immunization Summit (NAIIS) is soliciting candidates for the 2019 NAIIS Immunization Excellence Awards. The nominations deadline is February 15. 

The 2019 awards recognize individuals and organizations that have made extraordinary contributions in their communities toward improving vaccination rates. Read more about the qualities of the individuals and organizations that NAIIS is seeking in candidates.

Access descriptions of the five award categories accepting nominations, additional information about the awards, and the nomination form.

Related Link

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HANDOUTS


IAC updates its patient handout titled "Vaccines Work: CDC Statistics Demonstrate Dramatic Declines in Vaccine-Preventable Diseases"

IAC recently updated its educational resource for patients titled Vaccines Work: CDC Statistics Demonstrate Dramatic Declines in Vaccine-Preventable Diseases When Compared with the Pre-Vaccine Era to update morbidity data based on those compiled by CDC.



Related Link

  • Access all educational materials related to vaccine hesitancy on IAC's Vaccine Hesitancy web page

IAC's Handouts for Patients & Staff web section offers healthcare professionals and the public more than 250 FREE English-language handouts (many also available in translation), which we encourage website users to print out, copy, and distribute widely.

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OFFICIAL RELEASES AND ANNOUNCEMENTS


American Pharmacists Association issues revised guidelines for pharmacy-based immunization advocacy and administration

The American Pharmacists Association (APhA) has recently revised its Guidelines for Pharmacy-based Immunization Advocacy and Administration. The APhA made these revisions in response to the expanding role of pharmacists in raising the rate of immunizations. The guidelines address five focus areas: prevention, partnership, quality, documentation, and empowerment. An excerpt from the announcement is reprinted below.

The revised guidelines call for pharmacists to protect their patients’ health by being vaccine advocates; to collaborate, coordinate and communicate with immunization stakeholders to protect the community from vaccine-preventable diseases and to ensure quality by achieving and maintaining competence to administer immunizations.

Read the APhA press release: APhA Issues Revised Guidelines for Pharmacy-based Immunization Advocacy and Administration

Access the full document: Guidelines for Pharmacy-based Immunization Advocacy and Administration.

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FEATURED RESOURCES


American College of Physicians presents videos providing an overview of the 2019 adult vaccine recommendations

As part of its "I Raise the Rates" initiative, the American College of Physicians (ACP) has released a video series providing an overview of the 2019 adult vaccination recommendations. In this series, with Dr. Sandra Fryhofer, MD, MACP, explains the changes and provides a page-by-page overview as well as two patient case studies.  

View ACP's video series on the changes to the 2019 Adult Immunization Schedule.

Related Links

IAC's 142-page book, Vaccinating Adults: A Step-by-Step Guide, describes how to implement adult vaccination services in your healthcare setting and provides a review for staff who already vaccinate adults; IAC Guide available for free download

In late 2017, the Immunization Action Coalition (IAC) announced the publication of its new book, Vaccinating Adults: A Step-by-Step Guide (Guide).



This completely updated guide on adult immunization (originally published in 2004) provides easy-to-use, practical information covering important “how-to” activities to help providers enhance their existing adult immunization services or introduce them into any clinical setting, including:

  • setting up for vaccination services,
  • storing and handling vaccines,
  • deciding which people should receive which vaccines,
  • administering vaccines,
  • documenting vaccinations (including legal issues), and
  • understanding financial considerations and billing information.

In addition, the Guide is filled with hundreds of web addresses and references to help providers stay up to date on the latest immunization information, both now and in the future.

The entire Guide is available to download/print free of charge at www.immunize.org/guide. The downloaded version is suitable for double-sided printing. Options are available online to download the entire book or selected chapters. The development of the Guide was supported by the National Vaccine Program Office (NVPO) and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Expert staff from both agencies also provided early technical review of the content.

The Guide is a uniquely valuable resource to assist providers in increasing adult immunization rates. Be sure to get a copy today!

Related Links

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JOURNAL ARTICLES AND NEWSLETTERS


CDC and WHO report on vaccine-derived poliovirus in Papua, New Guinea, in this week's MMWR and Weekly Epidemiological Record, respectively

CDC published Circulating Vaccine-Derived Poliovirus Type 1 and Outbreak Response—Papua New Guinea, 2018 in “Notes from the Field" in the February 8 issue of MMWR (pages 119–120). On the same day, WHO's Weekly Epidemiological Record published an article on the same topic titled Circulating Vaccine-Derived Poliovirus Type 1 and Outbreak Response in Papua New Guinea, 2018 (pages 65–80). 

Related Links

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EDUCATION AND TRAINING


CDC web page provides recent updates to “The Pink Book" chapters and appendices
 
CDC recently published several updates and clarifications online for many chapters and appendices in Epidemiology and Prevention of Vaccine-Preventable Diseases, also known as "The Pink Book."  

The Epidemiology and Prevention of Vaccine-Preventable Diseases, 13th Edition, a.k.a. the “The Pink Book,” provides physicians, nurses, nurse practitioners, physician assistants, pharmacists, and others with the most comprehensive information on routinely used vaccines and the diseases they prevent.

View the recent updates and clarifications on the "Errata, Updates & Clarifications" web page for "The Pink Book."

Related Link

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MMWR and Medscape offer free continuing education activity titled "Update: Recommendations of the ACIP for Use of Hepatitis A Vaccine for Postexposure Prophylaxis and for Preexposure Prophylaxis for International Travel”

MMWR and Medscape have jointly introduced a new free continuing education activity titled Update: Recommendations of the ACIP for Use of Hepatitis A Vaccine for Postexposure Prophylaxis and for Preexposure Prophylaxis for International Travel.  

If you are not a registered user on Medscape, you can register for free and get unlimited access to all Medscape features, including continuing education activities.

Access the course on Medscape by visiting CDC's Medscape CME Activity web page and scroll down to the first item: Update: Recommendations of the ACIP for Use of Hepatitis A Vaccine for Postexposure Prophylaxis and for Preexposure Prophylaxis for International Travel.

Related Link

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Immunize Nevada hosts webinar titled “Social Networking for Disease Prevention” scheduled for February 20; CEU available

Immunize Nevada is hosting a one-hour webinar titled Social Networking for Disease Prevention on February 20 at 12:30 p.m. PST (3:30 p.m. ET). The presenter will be Nathan Boonstra, MD, pediatrician at Blank Children’s Pediatric Clinic in Des Moines, Iowa. The learning objectives for the webinar include:

  • Review recent outbreaks of vaccine-preventable disease in Nevada and nationally
  • Discuss research that looks at effective ways to improve parent perceptions of immunization
  • Suggest ways that parents and medical providers can be advocates for immunization in their daily lives

Participants will receive one free nursing or pharmacy CEU credit upon completion of the post-webinar survey.

Register for the webinar. For additional information or questions, contact Breanne at Breanne@immunizenevada.org.

Related Links

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HepB United offers webinar on February 21 titled "Hepatitis B: Dispelling Myths and Misconceptions—Focus on Transmission and Prevention"

Hep B United is presenting a webinar titled Hepatitis B: Dispelling Myths and Misconceptions—Focus on Transmission and Prevention on February 21 at 3:00 p.m. (ET). This one-hour webinar will include topics related to the spread of hepatitis B, the vaccine schedule, and the question of whether a woman infected with hepatitis B can breastfeed her baby. Panelists will be Maureen Kamischke, Hep B Foundation; Amy Shen Tang, MD, Hepatitis B program director and primary care internist; and Ponni Perumalswami, MD, associate professor of medicine and hepatologist, Mt. Sinai School of Medicine.

Register for the webinar.

Related link

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Reminder: 2019 Annual Conference on Vaccinology Research, April 3–5 in Baltimore; agenda and schedule available

The 2019 Annual Conference on Vaccinology Research will take place on April 3–5 in Baltimore. The 2 1/2 day conference, sponsored by the National Foundation for Infectious Diseases, will bring together more than 350 researchers from around the world to address the following topics: 

  • Clinical testing and evaluation
  • Immunology
  • Product development
  • Regulation
  • Other aspects of vaccine research, development, and delivery

The detailed schedule with the agenda is now posted online.

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About IAC Express
The Immunization Action Coalition welcomes redistribution of this issue of IAC Express or selected articles. When you do so, please add a note that the Immunization Action Coalition is the source of the material and provide a link to this issue.

If you have trouble receiving or displaying IAC Express messages, visit our online help section.

IAC Express is supported in part by Grant No. 6NH23IP922550 from the National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases, CDC. Its contents are solely the responsibility of IAC and do not necessarily represent the official views of CDC. IAC Express is also supported by educational grants from the following companies: AstraZeneca, Inc.; Merck Sharp & Dohme Corp.; Pfizer, Inc.; and Sanofi Pasteur.

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ISSN: 1526-1786
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The Immortal Cells of Henrietta Lacks: In 1951, a Johns Hopkins scientist received a tumor sample from a patient named Henrietta Lacks, the cells of which did not die like other human cells. They were shared widely among laboratories without Mrs. Lacks' consent. The tumor cells' ability to keep replicating enabled scientists to develop polio and HPV vaccines as well as countless cures. (Source TED-Ed)
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Editor:
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Managing Editor:
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Courtnay Londo, MA
Jane Myers, MA, EdM  
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AAFP: American Academy of Family Physicians
AAP: American Academy of Pediatrics
ACIP: Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices
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FDA: Food and Drug Administration
IAC: Immunization Action Coalition
MMWR: Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report
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This website is supported in part by a cooperative agreement from the National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases (Grant No. 6NH23IP22550) at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in Atlanta, GA. The website content is the sole responsibility of IAC and does not necessarily represent the official views of CDC.