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Issue 1218

Issue 1218: December 9, 2015  

Ask the Experts
Ask the Experts—Question of the Week: There is a debate within my clinical department about not allowing…read more


TOP STORIES


IAC HANDOUTS


VACCINE INFORMATION STATEMENTS


OFFICIAL RELEASES AND ANNOUNCEMENTS


FEATURED RESOURCES


JOURNAL ARTICLES AND NEWSLETTERS


EDUCATION AND TRAINING


CONFERENCES AND MEETINGS

 


TOP STORIES


It's National Influenza Vaccination Week! Make sure your patients age 6 months and older are protected now and into 2016. 

National Influenza Vaccination Week (NIVW) is being held December 6–12. This event highlights the importance of continuing influenza vaccination throughout the season. CDC published Announcement: National Influenza Vaccination Week—December 6–12, 2015 in the December 4 issue of MMWR (page 1319). The complete announcement is reprinted below.

The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, CDC, state and local health departments, and other partners will observe National Influenza Vaccination Week (NIVW) during December 6–12, 2015, with educational and promotional activities across the country.

Beginning in 2005, NIVW was established to highlight the importance of annual influenza vaccination and to foster greater use of influenza vaccine during the months of December, January, and beyond. As of November 13, 2015, approximately 133 million doses of 2015–2016 seasonal influenza vaccine have been distributed to vaccination providers in the United States.

The Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices recommends influenza vaccination for all persons aged ≥6 months, with rare exceptions. Influenza vaccination is especially important for persons in certain groups who are at higher risk for influenza-related complications. Those high-risk groups include children aged <5 years, but especially children aged <2 years; persons with certain chronic health conditions, such as heart disease, asthma, and diabetes; pregnant women; and adults aged ≥65 years. Health care personnel are at risk for acquiring influenza and transmitting it to their patients.

Information about event-specific educational materials, web tools, and CDC's planned activities for NIVW is available at http://www.cdc.gov/flu/nivw/index.htm, and general materials are available at http://www.cdc.gov/flu/freeresources. Additional information and resources for health care professionals and patients are available at http://www.cdc.gov/flu/professionals.

Influenza vaccination coverage estimates for 2014–2015 are available at http://www.cdc.gov/flu/fluvaxview. Interim vaccination coverage estimates for 2015–2016 will be released during NIVW.


Related Links

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Federal and military employees: Help IAC by using agency code 10612 when you make your Combined Federal Campaign contribution before December 15

Federal and military employees have an easy, hassle-free option for contributing to IAC—the Combined Federal Campaign (CFC). Each fall, federal and military employees are allowed to make contributions to charities of their choice through CFC. 

By filling out a CFC pledge card (available through your local campaign volunteers) before December 15, you can contribute to IAC by cash, check, or payroll deduction. If you would like to contribute to us, please enter our five-digit agency code, 10612, and a dollar amount on your 2016 CFC pledge card. 

Thank you so much for your support of IAC's work!

For more information about CFC, go to: www.opm.gov/combined-federal-campaign


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IAC’s “Take a Stand™” workshops proving highly successful around the country: Register NOW for the next sessions in California (January 19–23, 2016) 

The Immunization Action Coalition (IAC), with support from Pfizer, has implemented Take a Stand™, a national effort designed to improve adult immunization rates by increasing the use of standing orders in medical practices.*
 
At the core of this project are free workshops led by national experts, including L.J Tan, MS, PhD; William Atkinson, MD, MPH; and Deborah Wexler, MD, from IAC, and Alexandra Stewart, JD, from George Washington University. These workshops already have been conducted in Louisville, KY; Chicago, IL; Norfolk, VA; Nashville, TN; and Little Rock, AR. To illustrate how these have been going, here is a small sampling of comments received from attendees:
 
“Not only does this workshop provide great education, but it provides you with the tools and resources you need to implement this within your practice.” J.M., APN, MPH (Chicago, IL)
 
“This workshop gave us great ideas and information. Can’t wait to go back and start this process to get our Standing Orders going.”
T.S., clinical manager (Fredericksburg, VA)
 
“Fantastic—great expertise, resources, tools and advice.”
D.S. (Nashville, TN)
 
“This workshop is excellent for nursing directors/managers in the ambulatory setting. Excellent resources for preventive services.”
L.R., primary care service line nursing director (Little Rock, AR)
 
Don’t miss your chance to join these satisfied attendees. The next workshops are scheduled for 2016 in four California cities.

Be sure to note that these are one-time only events in each city. 

Who should attend? Clinicians, nurses, and practice managers in medical offices that serve adults, as well as pharmacists and quality improvement managers, will benefit from the workshops.
 
In addition to the California sessions, other workshop locations and schedules, a sample agenda, and online registration are available on the Take a Stand™ website at www.standingorders.org

Please “take a stand” with us and spread the word about this unique opportunity for medical practices to improve their adult immunization rates while empowering staff and streamlining facility operations.
 
* Standing orders are written protocols approved by a physician or other authorized practitioner that allow qualified healthcare professionals (who are eligible to do so under state law, such as registered nurses or pharmacists) to assess the need for vaccination and to vaccinate patients meeting certain criteria. 
 
Workshop Information

Related Links

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CDC updates its Vaccine Conversations with Parents website

CDC recently updated its Provider Resources for Vaccine Conversations with Parents website. The new design provides better access from mobile devices.

CDC developed the suite of handouts found on this website in collaboration with the American Academy of Pediatrics and the American Academy of Family Physicians. The resources were designed to help immunization providers assess parents' needs, identify the role they want to play in making decisions for their child’s health, and then communicate in ways that meet their needs.


Related Links

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Vaccine Education Center updates its fact sheets for parents and patients on HPV and meningococcal vaccines

The Vaccine Education Center at the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia has updated the following two fact sheets for parents and patients:

These handouts are part of a series of Q&A sheets about vaccines and vaccine safety.  

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WHO's Emergency Committee under the International Health Regulations reports on the international spread of polio 

On November 26, WHO's Emergency Committee under the International Health Regulations released a summary of its November 10 meeting on the international spread of polio. Sections of the summary are reprinted below.

Introductory paragraph
The seventh meeting of the Emergency Committee under the International Health Regulations (2005) (IHR) regarding the international spread of poliovirus was convened via teleconference by the Director-General on 10 November 2015. The Director General of WHO had noted the concerns expressed by the Emergency Committee in its August 2015 report with respect to circulating vaccine-derived polioviruses (cVDPV). In response, she convened this meeting of the Emergency Committee with broader terms than was previously the case to also look at outbreaks of cVDPV. During the current polio endgame cVDPVs reflect serious gaps in immunity to poliovirus due to weaknesses in routine immunization coverage in otherwise polio-free countries. Moreover, there is a particular urgency to stopping type 2 cVDPV in advance of the globally synchronized withdrawal of type 2 OPV in April 2016.

States currently exporting wild poliovirus or cVDPV
Currently Pakistan (last wild poliovirus exportation: 27 August 2015) and Afghanistan (last wild poliovirus exportation: 6 June 2015)

States infected with wild poliovirus or cVDPV but not currently exporting
Currently (any cVDPV detected within preceding six months) Nigeria, Guinea, Madagascar, Ukraine, and Lao People’s Democratic Republic

States no longer infected by wild poliovirus or cVDPV, but which remain vulnerable to international spread, and states that are vulnerable to the emergence and circulation of VDPV
Currently Somalia, Ethiopia, Syria, Iraq, Israel, Equatorial Guinea, Cameroon and South Sudan


Read the complete document, including recommendations for these countries: Statement on the Seventh IHR Emergency Committee meeting regarding the international spread of poliovirus

Related Links

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IAC Spotlight! Read Technically Speaking columns by IAC's Dr. Deborah Wexler for practical vaccination information

Technically Speaking is a monthly column written by IAC’s executive director Deborah Wexler, MD. The column is featured in The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia Vaccine Education Center’s (VEC's) monthly e-newsletter for healthcare professionals. Technically Speaking columns cover practical topics in immunization delivery such as needle length, vaccine administration, cold chain, and immunization schedules.

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IAC HANDOUTS


IAC releases new one-page guidance sheet for healthcare professionals: "Meningococcal Vaccine Recommendations by Age and Risk Factor for Serogroup B Protection"  

IAC recently posted a new one-page guidance sheet for healthcare professionals titled Meningococcal Vaccine Recommendations by Age and Risk Factor for Serogroup B Protection. This document covers recommendations for both routine and risk-based meningococcal serogroup B vaccination.

For information on vaccines that provides protection against meningococcal serogroup A, C, W, and Y disease, see Meningococcal Vaccine Recommendations by Age and Risk Factor for Serogroups A, C,W, or Y Protection.

Related Link

IAC's Handouts for Patients & Staff web section offers healthcare professionals and the public more than 250 FREE English-language handouts (many also available in translation), which we encourage website users to print out, copy, and distribute widely.

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IAC develops new standing orders template titled "Standing Orders for Administering Meningococcal B Vaccine to Adolescents and Adults"

IAC recently developed a new standing orders template for administering meningococcal serogroup B vaccine to adolescents and adults. 

Related Links

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IAC updates and redesigns "How to Administer Intramuscular and Subcutaneous Vaccine Injections"

IAC has updated and redesigned its handout for healthcare professionals titled How to Administer Intramuscular and Subcutaneous Vaccine Injections. Besides the new format, the piece now includes information about meningococcal serotype B vaccines, and the abbreviation for "subcutaneous" was changed from "SC" to "subcut."

Related Link

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IAC releases updated Spanish translation of "Screening Checklist for Contraindications to Inactivated Injectable Influenza Vaccination"

IAC has posted an updated Spanish translation of its "Screening Checklist for Contraindications to Inactivated Injectable Influenza Vaccination." The text now matches the English version that was updated in August. 

Related Link

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VACCINE INFORMATION STATEMENTS


IAC posts nine translations of the PCV13 and pediatric multi-vaccine VISs   

IAC has posted Arabic, Burmese, Chinese (simplified and traditional), French, Russian, Somali, Spanish, and Vietnamese translations of the recently updated PCV13 and pediatric multi-vaccine VISs. 

Translations of the PCV13 VIS

Translations of the pediatric multi-vaccine VIS

Related Link

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OFFICIAL RELEASES AND ANNOUNCEMENTS


CDC publishes medical guidelines for use during a mass casualty incident due to anthrax

CDC published Clinical Framework and Medical Countermeasure Use During an Anthrax Mass-Casualty Incident in the December 4 issue of MMWR Recommendations and Reports. A portion of the summary section is reprinted below.

These guidelines provided recommended best practices for the diagnosis and treatment of persons with naturally occurring or bioterrorism-related anthrax in conventional medical settings. An aerosolized release of Bacillus anthracis spores over densely populated areas could become a mass-casualty incident. To prepare for this possibility, the U.S. government has stockpiled equipment and therapeutics (known as medical countermeasures [MCMs]) for anthrax prevention and treatment. However, previously developed, publicly available clinical recommendations have not addressed the use of MCMs or clinical management during an anthrax mass-casualty incident, when the number of patients is likely to exceed the ability of the health care infrastructure to provide conventional standards of care and supplies of MCMs might be inadequate to meet the demand required. 


The full guidance document referenced above is available here.

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FEATURED RESOURCES


CDC releases the 13th edition of "The Pink Book" in e-book format

Developed by CDC and distributed through the Public Health Foundation, Epidemiology and Prevention of Vaccine-Preventable Diseases, 13th Edition ("The Pink Book”) is now available as an e-book. "The Pink Book" provides the most current, comprehensive, and credible information on vaccine-preventable diseases, and contains updated content on immunization and vaccine information for public health practitioners, healthcare providers, health educators, pharmacists, nurses, and others involved in administering immunizations.

The e-book format contains all of the information that is in the print version, in a handy format that allows quick access to desired information through features such as keyword search and chapter links.

Purchase the e-book version of Epidemiology and Prevention of Vaccine-Preventable Diseases

Access more information about the The Pink Book in e-book format.

Download Epidemiology and Prevention of Vaccine-Preventable Diseases

Order Epidemiology and Prevention of Vaccine-Preventable Diseases as a soft-cover book

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AAP's Red Book now available in Spanish in print and online

The updated Red Book: 2015 Report of the Committee on Infectious Diseases, 30th edition (American Academy of Pediatrics [AAP]), is now available in Spanish, both in print and online. The Red Book provides evidence-based guidance to practicing clinicians on pediatric infections and vaccinations based on the recommendations of the committee as well as the combined expertise of CDC, the FDA, and hundreds of physician contributors.

The 2015 Red Book is available to AAP members at a discount; non-AAP members can also purchase copies of the print or online editions.

Ordering information

  • Red Book: 2015 Report of the Committee on Infectious Diseases, 30th edition (English versions)
  • Red Book: 2015 Report of the Committee on Infectious Diseases, 30th edition (Spanish versions)

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Influenza is serious; many resources are available to help healthcare professionals in vaccinating

Vaccination remains the single most effective means of preventing influenza, and is recommended for everyone age six months and older. If you don't provide influenza vaccination in your clinic, please recommend vaccination to your patients and refer them to a clinic or pharmacy that provides vaccines or to the HealthMap Vaccine Finder to locate sites near their workplaces or homes that offer influenza vaccination services.

Following is a list of resources related to influenza disease and vaccination for healthcare professionals and the public:

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IAC makes available The Vaccine Handbook: A Practical Guide for Clinicians, a.k.a. "The Purple Book," by Dr. Gary Marshall

The Vaccine Handbook: A Practical Guide for Clinicians (“The Purple Book,” 2015, 560 pages) is a uniquely comprehensive source of practical, up-to-date information for vaccine providers and educators. Its author, Gary S. Marshall, MD, has drawn together the latest vaccine science and guidance into a concise, user-friendly, practical resource for the private office, public health clinic, academic medical center, and hospital.
Order your copy of The Vaccine Handbook today!
IAC Executive Director Deborah Wexler, MD, is enthusiastic about helping get this book circulated as widely as possible. “During more than 20 years in the field of immunization education, I have not seen a book that is so brimming with state-of-the-science vaccine information,” she states. "This book belongs in the hands of every medical student, physician-in-training, doctor, nursing student, and nurse who provides vaccines to patients.”
 
The Vaccine Handbook provides:

  • Information on every licensed vaccine in the United States
  • Rationale behind authoritative vaccine recommendations
  • Contingencies encountered in everyday practice
  • A chapter dedicated to addressing vaccine concerns
  • Background on how vaccine policy is made
  • Standards and regulations
  • Office logistics, including billing procedures, and much more

About the Author
Gary Marshall, MD, is professor of pediatrics at the University of Louisville School of Medicine in Kentucky, where he serves as chief of the division of pediatric infectious diseases and director of the Pediatric Clinical Trials Unit. In addition to being a busy clinician, he is nationally known for his work in the areas of vaccine research, advocacy, and education.

The newly released fifth edition of this invaluable guide is now available on IAC’s website at www.immunize.org/vaccine-handbook.

The price of the handbook is $29.95 each, plus shipping charges. Discount pricing is available for more than 10 copies. Order copies for your staff or for distribution at an upcoming conference.

Quantity Discount Pricing

  • 1–10 books: no discount + shipping
  • 11–50 books: 5% + shipping
  • 51–100 books: 10% + shipping
  • 101–500 books: 15% + shipping
  • 501–1000 books: 20% + shipping

For quotes on larger quantities, email admininfo@immunize.org.

Order your copy today!

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JOURNAL ARTICLES AND NEWSLETTERS


November issue of CDC's Immunization Works newsletter now available

CDC recently released the November issue of its monthly newsletter Immunization Works and posted it on the website of the National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases (NCIRD). The newsletter offers the immunization community information about current topics. The information is in the public domain and can be reproduced and circulated widely.

Related Links

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EDUCATION AND TRAINING


CDC offers new Medscape Expert Commentary on influenza vaccination of healthcare personnel 

On November 16, CDC published a new Medscape Expert Commentary titled Why Health Care Providers Must Receive a Flu Vaccine. This article was written by Carolyn Buxton Bridges, MD, associate director of adult immunization in the Immunization Services Division, National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases, CDC.

You will need to log in to view any Medscape offerings. Registration is free.

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National Area Health Education Center Organization to present webinar on December 9 about using social media to reach healthcare professionals with HPV vaccination information
 

The National Area Health Education Center Organization will offer a one-hour webinar on December 9, 3:00 p.m. (ET), titled Using Social Media to Reach Health Care Providers. Presenter Kelli Vos is the communications coordinator for the George Washington University (GW) Cancer Institute, responsible for overseeing strategic communication planning and managing the GW Cancer Institute’s online presence.

The National Area Health Education Center Organization received funding from CDC to provide education to healthcare professionals regarding the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine. Selected AHEC entities in all 50 states are working to increase awareness as well as train healthcare professionals about the HPV vaccine.

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CONFERENCES AND MEETINGS


Presentation slides from October ACIP meeting are now available

ACIP recently posted the presentation slides from the ACIP meeting held on October 21. The meeting agenda was previously released.

Related Links

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ASK THE EXPERTS

Question of the Week

There is a debate within my clinical department about not allowing influenza vaccine to be given with DTaP and PCV13. Are there data that state these should not be given concomitantly?   

A CDC study has shown a small increased risk for febrile seizures during the 24 hours after a child receives the inactivated influenza vaccine at the same time as the PCV13 vaccine or DTaP vaccine. However, the risk of febrile seizure with any combination of these vaccines is small and the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) recommends giving these vaccines at the same visit if indicated. See www.cdc.gov/vaccinesafety/concerns/febrile-seizures.html for more information.


About IAC's Question of the Week

Each week, IAC Express highlights a new, topical, or important-to-reiterate Q&A. This feature is a cooperative venture between IAC and CDC. William L. Atkinson, MD, MPH, IAC's associate director for immunization education, chooses a new Q&A to feature every week from a set of Q&As prepared by experts at CDC’s National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases.

We hope you enjoy this new feature and find it helpful when dealing with difficult real-life scenarios in your vaccination practice. Please encourage your health care professional colleagues to sign up to receive IAC Express at www.immunize.org/subscribe.

If you have a question for the CDC immunization experts, you can email them directly at nipinfo@cdc.gov. There is no charge for this service.

Related Links

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About IAC Express
The Immunization Action Coalition welcomes redistribution of this issue of IAC Express or selected articles. When you do so, please add a note that the Immunization Action Coalition is the source of the material and provide a link to this issue.
If you have trouble receiving or displaying IAC Express messages, visit our online help section.
IAC Express is supported in part by Grant No. U38IP000589 from the National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases, CDC. Its contents are solely the responsibility of IAC and do not necessarily represent the official views of CDC. IAC Express is also supported by educational grants from the following companies: AstraZeneca, Inc.; bioCSL Inc.; Merck Sharp & Dohme Corp.; Pfizer, Inc.; and Sanofi Pasteur.
IAC Express Disclaimer
ISSN: 1526-1786 Our mailing address is
Immunization Action Coalition
2550 University Avenue West, Suite 415 North
Saint Paul, MN 55114

Copyright (C) 2015 Immunization Action Coalition
All rights reserved.

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Four-month-old Coughing with Pertussis
Four-month-old Coughing with Pertussis: Rebecca Harreman shares video of her 4-month-old son with choking cough and tear in his eye on 23rd day of illness. She urges viewers to vaccinate their babies.
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AAFP: American Academy of Family Physicians
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This website is supported in part by a cooperative agreement from the National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases (Grant No. 6NH23IP22550) at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in Atlanta, GA. The website content is the sole responsibility of IAC and does not necessarily represent the official views of CDC.