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2013 Issues
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Issue 1047
IAC Express: Weekly immunization news and information
Issue 1047: March 26, 2013

TOP STORIES

IAC HANDOUTS

VACCINE INFORMATION STATEMENTS

OFFICIAL RELEASES AND ANNOUNCEMENTS

FEATURED RESOURCES

EDUCATION AND TRAINING


TOP STORIES

CDC publishes ACIP recommendations for prevention and control of meningococcal disease
On March 22, CDC published Prevention and Control of Meningococcal Disease: Recommendations of the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP). The summary section is reprinted below.

Meningococcal disease describes the spectrum of infections caused by Neisseria meningiditis, including meningitis, bacteremia, and bacteremic pneumonia. Two quadrivalent meningococcal polysaccharide-protein conjugate vaccines that provide protection against meningococcal serogroups A, C, W, and Y (MenACWY-D [Menactra, manufactured by Sanofi Pasteur, Inc., Swiftwater, Pennsylvania] and MenACWY-CRM [Menveo, manufactured by Novartis Vaccines, Cambridge, Massachusetts]) are licensed in the United States for use among persons aged 2 through 55 years. MenACWY-D also is licensed for use among infants and toddlers aged 9 through 23 months. Quadrivalent meningococcal polysaccharide vaccine (MPSV4 [Menomune, manufactured by sanofi pasteur, Inc., Swiftwater, Pennsylvania]) is the only vaccine licensed for use among persons aged ≥56 years. A bivalent meningococcal polysaccharide protein conjugate vaccine that provides protection against meningococcal serogroups C and Y along with Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) (Hib-MenCY-TT [MenHibrix, manufactured by GlaxoSmithKline Biologicals, Rixensart, Belgium]) is licensed for use in children aged 6 weeks through 18 months.

This report compiles and summarizes all recommendations from CDC's Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) regarding prevention and control of meningococcal disease in the United States, specifically the changes in the recommendations published since 2005 (CDC. Prevention and control of meningococcal disease: recommendations of the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices [ACIP].
MMWR 2005;54  [No. RR-7]). As a comprehensive summary of previously published recommendations, this report does not contain any new recommendations; it is intended for use by clinicians as a resource. ACIP recommends routine vaccination with a quadrivalent meningococcal conjugate vaccine (MenACWY) for adolescents aged 11 or 12 years, with a booster dose at age 16 years. ACIP also recommends routine vaccination for persons at increased risk for meningococcal disease (i.e., persons who have persistent complement component deficiencies, persons who have anatomic or functional asplenia, microbiologists who routinely are exposed to isolates of N. meningitidis, military recruits, and persons who travel to or reside in areas in which meningococcal disease is hyperendemic or epidemic). Guidelines for antimicrobial chemoprophylaxis and for evaluation and management of suspected outbreaks of meningococcal disease also are provided.

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Pediatric influenza deaths in 2012–13 stand at 105; about 90 percent of those who died were not vaccinated
On March 22, CDC posted a Seasonal Influenza Spotlight article titled CDC Reports About 90 Percent of Children Who Died From Flu This Season Not Vaccinated. Portions of the article are reprinted below.

The number of influenza-associated pediatric deaths reported to CDC during the current season surpassed 100 this week as an additional 6 deaths were reported in FluView. This brings the total number of influenza-associated pediatric deaths reported to CDC, to date, to 105 for the 2012–2013 season.

Pediatric deaths are defined as flu-associated deaths that occur in people younger than 18 years. An early look at this season’s reports indicates that about 90 percent occurred in children who had not received a flu vaccination this season.

This review also indicated that 60 percent of deaths occurred in children who were at high risk of developing serious flu-related complications, but 40 percent of these children had no recognized chronic health problems. The proportions of pediatric deaths occurring in children who were unvaccinated and those who had high-risk conditions are consistent with what has been seen in previous seasons.

Children younger than 5 years of age and children of any age with certain chronic health conditions, including asthma or other lung disorders, heart disease, or a neurologic or neurodevelopmental disorder are at high risk of developing serious complications from flu infection.


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National Infant Immunization Week is April 20–27; be sure to check out CDC's new promotional materials
This year, National Infant Immunization Week (NIIW) will be held April 20–27. NIIW is an annual observance to highlight the importance of protecting infants from vaccine-preventable diseases and celebrate the achievements of immunization programs and their partners in promoting healthy communities. Since 1994, NIIW has served as a call to action for parents, caregivers, and healthcare providers to ensure that infants are fully immunized against 14 vaccine-preventable diseases.

CDC has recently developed and posted the following materials to help you promote NIIW in your community.

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Are you planning an activity for National Infant Immunization Week? CDC would like to know about it!
If you are planning an activity—large or small—for 2013 National Infant Immunization Week (NIIW), CDC would like to post information about your activity on its NIIW Activities around the World web page. Use the NIIW Activity Form to notify CDC electronically about your activity.

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IAC Spotlight! Eight more healthcare organizations join IAC's Honor Roll for Patient Safety
IAC urges qualifying healthcare organizations to apply for its Honor Roll for Patient Safety. The honor roll recognizes hospitals, medical practices, professional organizations, and government entities that have taken a stand for patient safety by implementing mandatory influenza vaccination policies for healthcare personnel. More than 250 organizations are now enrolled.

Since February 26, when IAC Express last reported on the Honor Roll for Patient Safety, the following eight organizations have been enrolled.

Healthcare organizations and health agencies: Huntsville Pediatric Associates, Huntsville, AL; CHC, Inc., Middletown, CT; North Hawaii Community Hospital, Kamuela, HI; Champaign-Urbana Public Health District, Champaign, IL; District Health Department #10, Cadillac, MI; Coastal Children's Clinic, New Bern, NC; Lehigh Valley Health Network, Allentown, PA; and Hillcrest Baptist Medical Center, Waco, TX.

Related Links
  • Listing of all honorees by state
  • Position statements from professional societies and leading healthcare organizations in support of mandatory influenza vaccination
  • Honor roll web section, which includes access to the application form (see the gold trophy cup in right column, and click on the words "Apply for the Honor Roll")
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IAC HANDOUTS

IAC updates its standing orders templates for administering Tdap and Td vaccines
IAC recently updated its two standing orders templates for administering Tdap and Td vaccines. The two standing orders now include information about giving Tdap to pregnant women during each pregnancy.
  1. Standing Orders for Administering Tdap/Td to Children Age 7 Years and Older
  2. Standing Orders for Administering Tdap/Td to Adults
Related Link
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IAC's "Cocooning Protects Babies" handout now includes information about giving Tdap with each pregnancy
IAC recently revised Cocooning Protects Babies with information that pregnant women should receive a Tdap vaccination with each pregnancy.

IAC's Handouts for Patients & Staff web section offers healthcare professionals and the public more than 250 FREE English-language handouts (many also available in translation), which we encourage website users to print out, copy, and distribute widely.

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VACCINE INFORMATION STATEMENTS

VIS for PCV13 now available in Spanish, Arabic, Chinese, French, Russian, Somali, and Vietnamese
IAC recently posted translations of CDC's newly released VIS for pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV13) in Spanish, Arabic, Chinese, French, Russian, Somali, and Vietnamese.

Important note: CDC's Note to Providers has additional information about the PCV13 vaccine, including guidance on precautions and contraindications and links to appropriate ACIP recommendations

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OFFICIAL RELEASES AND ANNOUNCEMENTS
New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene issues new vaccination recommendations for men at risk of contracting meningitis
On March 6, the New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene issued a press release titled Health Department Issues New Vaccination Recommendations for Men at Greatest Risk for Contracting Meningitis: Four new cases of meningitis among men who have sex with men have been reported in 2013. Three of the last five cases have been fatal. Portions of the press release are reprinted below.

The Health Department issued new recommendations today for vaccinating against invasive meningococcal disease—commonly known as meningitis—after an increase in cases. Vaccinations are now advised for men, regardless of HIV status, who regularly have intimate contact with other men met through a website, digital application (“App”), or at a bar or party.

Four new cases of meningitis among men who have sex with men have been reported since the beginning of January, bringing the total to 17 cases since 2012. There have been 22 reported cases—including seven fatal cases—since 2010.

“Meningitis symptoms usually come on quickly, and the disease can be fatal if not treated right away,” said Health Commissioner Dr. Thomas Farley. “Vaccination is the best defense. I urge all men who meet these criteria—regardless of whether they identify as gay—to get vaccinated now and protect themselves from this disease before it is too late.”


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FEATURED RESOURCES

The History of Vaccines, a new book for teens, traces the development of vaccines from the late 1700s to today
Published in January 2013, The History of Vaccines covers the birth of vaccination in the late 1700s and traces the influences of the bacteriological revolution of the late 1800s into the rapidly expanding field of vaccinology. 

Written by Karie Youngdahl, Babi Hammond, and Michelle Sipics, the 52-page book is intended for a teen audience and high school science, health, and history classes. The publisher is HistoryofVaccines.org, an informational, educational website created by the College of Physicians of Philadelphia.

The book, which includes correlations to national education standards, has more than 40 colorful and visually engaging illustrations, photographs, and charts. The titles of the book's seven chapters are listed below:
  • What Is a Vaccine?
  • Early Methods of Vaccination
  • The Bacteriological Revolution
  • The Fight Against Polio
  • Aiming at Childhood Illnesses
  • Anti-Vaccination Movements
  • The Future of Vaccines
Over the next several months, the History of Vaccines team at the College of Physicians of Philadelphia will be sending out complimentary copies of the book to targeted high school science and health departments.

You can support The History of Vaccines by buying a copy for yourself or your favorite high school biology, history, or health teacher or school nurse.

Copies are available only on Amazon. The cost is $9.99 per copy. If you are interested in purchasing more than 10 copies for a pediatric practice or other use, contact the History of Vaccines team by email.

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CDC's adult vaccine prescription pads available for downloading and ordering
To help providers educate patients about adult vaccination, CDC has posted a new form, designed to look like a prescription pad, that has a check list of routinely recommended adult vaccines and space for the provider's signature at the bottom. You can make copies of the form for use with patients.

Alternatively, providers can order 10 adult vaccine prescription pads (50 sheets per pad) from the Public Health Foundation for $18.

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Influenza is serious; vaccination is recommended for nearly everyone, so please keep vaccinating your patients
Vaccination remains the single most effective means of preventing influenza. Vaccination is recommended for everyone age 6 months and older, so please continue to vaccinate your patients. If you don't provide influenza vaccination in your clinic, please recommend vaccination to your patients and refer them to the HealthMap Vaccine Finder to locate sites near their workplaces or homes that offer influenza vaccination services.

If you are seeking influenza vaccine for your clinic, check the Influenza Vaccine Availability Tracking System (IVATS), which is a resource for healthcare settings looking to purchase influenza vaccine. The IVATS chart contains information from approved, enrolled, and participating wholesale vaccine distributors or manufacturers of U.S. licensed influenza vaccine. Information is updated on an ongoing basis.

Following is a list of resources related to influenza disease and vaccination for healthcare professionals and the public.

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EDUCATION AND TRAINING

Vaccine Education Center posts archive of Dr. Paul Offit’s March 13 webinar
The Vaccine Education Center (VEC) at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia recently made the archive of its March 13 Vaccine Update webinar available. Click on the purple button titled "View Spring 2013 Presentation" and register (at no cost) to listen to the webinar and view the accompanying slide set. The webinar is accredited for one continuing medical education credit through March 14, 2014.

Paul Offit, MD, director of VEC, covered the following topics during the webinar:
  • Pertussis: Are vaccine-resistant strains emerging?
  • Influenza: Conceptually different vaccines will be available for 2013–2014
  • HibMenCY: One component is routinely recommended for all infants, the other for high-risk infants. What to do?
  • Pneumococcal vaccine: Update to PCV-13 recommendation
Related Links
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CDC adds module on hepatitis A vaccine to its "You Call the Shots" training course
CDC recently announced the addition of a new hepatitis A vaccine module to NCIRD's web-based training course "You Call the Shots." Continuing Education (CE) credit is available for viewing a module and completing an evaluation.

Related Link
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About IAC Express
The Immunization Action Coalition welcomes redistribution of this issue of IAC Express or selected articles. When you do so, please add a note that the Immunization Action Coalition is the source of the material and provide a link to this issue.
If you have trouble receiving or displaying IAC Express messages, visit our online help section.
IAC Express is supported in part by Grant No. U38IP000589 from the National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases, CDC. Its contents are solely the responsibility of IAC and do not necessarily represent the official views of CDC. IAC Express is also supported by educational grants from the following companies: CSL Biotherapies; GlaxoSmithKline; MedImmune, Inc.; Merck Sharp & Dohme Corp.; Novartis Vaccines; Ortho Clinical Diagnostics, Inc.; Pfizer, Inc.; and sanofi pasteur.
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Issue Abbreviations
AAFP, American Academy of Family Physicians; AAP, American Academy of Pediatrics; ACIP, Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices; AMA, American Medical Association; CDC, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention; FDA, Food and Drug Administration; IAC, Immunization Action Coalition; MMWR, Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report; NCIRD, National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases; NIVS, National Influenza Vaccine Summit; VIS, Vaccine Information Statement; VPD, vaccine-preventable disease; WHO, World Health Organization.
Publication Staff
Editor: Deborah L. Wexler, MD
Managing Editor: Dale Thompson, MA
Associate Editor: Teresa Anderson, DDS, MPH
Editorial Assistant: Janelle Tangonan Anderson
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This page was reviewed on January 27, 2014
 
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This website is supported in part by a cooperative agreement from the National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases (Grant No. 5U38IP000290) at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in Atlanta, GA. The website content is the sole responsibility of IAC and does not necessarily represent the official views of CDC.