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Issue 1043
IAC Express: Weekly immunization news and information
Issue 1043: March 5, 2013

TOP STORIES

IAC HANDOUTS

VACCINE INFORMATION STATEMENTS

FEATURED RESOURCES

JOURNAL ARTICLES AND NEWSLETTERS

NOMINATIONS AND AWARDS

EDUCATION AND TRAINING



TOP STORIES

Reminder: February issues of Needle Tips and Vaccinate Adults available online
The February 2013 issues of Needle Tips and Vaccinate Adults are available online. Vaccinate Adults is an abbreviated version of Needle Tips with the pediatric content removed.

Click on the images below to download the entire February 2013 issues (PDF) of Needle Tips and/or Vaccinate Adults.

Download February 2013 issue of Needle TipsDownload February 2013 issue of Vaccinate Adults

Needle Tips: View the table of contents, magazine viewer, and back issues.

Vaccinate Adults: View the table of contents, magazine viewer, and back issues.

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Vaccineinformation.org, IAC's newly launched website for the public, presents vaccination schedules arranged by age group
The recent relaunch of www.vaccineinformation.orgVaccine Information You Need website—includes detailed information about vaccine recommendations for people of all ages. The Vaccines You Need web section is organized into sections based on four age groups—Infants/Children, Preteens, Teens, and Adults. This arrangement allows visitors to easily find immunization guidance pertinent to people of a specific age range.

The Vaccine Information You Need website is one of the most comprehensive and user-friendly sources of scientifically accurate and easily navigable immunization information on the Web today.

We hope you'll take the time to explore www.vaccineinformation.org.

If you have a website, blog, or Facebook page, please link to www.vaccineinformation.org. Thanks!

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"The Story of Immunization" is the focus of the 2013 special edition of South Dakota Medicine

South Dakota Medicine recently published its 2013 special edition, The Story of Immunization. The edition is devoted to an exploration of the safety and efficacy of vaccines and their importance in relation to public health. It includes articles on the history of vaccines, the science of vaccination, outbreaks, and much more.

Based on a collaboration of experts from the front lines, industry, academia, and public health, the edition includes articles from local and national authors. It is co-edited by Wendell W. Hoffman, MD, and Keith Hansen, MD.

The following are among the many authors who contributed to the special edition: Robert L. Allison, MD; Deborah L. Wexler, MD; Gregory A. Poland, MD, MACP, FIDSA, et al.; Wendell W. Hoffman, MD, FACP; Joseph E. Segeleon, MD; Rachel M. Cunningham, MPH, et al.; Anne Schuchat, MD; Jennifer L. Hsu, MD; Corwin A. Robertson, MD, MPH, FACP; Maria Carrillo-Marquez, MD, et al.; Gary S. Marshall, MD; Jerome Blake, MD, et al.; Erick Temoka, MD; Mary D. Nettleman, MD, MS, MACP, et al.; Adrianne Racek, MSIV, et al.; Lon Kightlinger, PhD; Amy V. Groom, MPH; Srividya Srinivasan, MD; James M. Keegan, MD, et al.; Marie R. Griffin, MD, MPH; Kelly Hefti, MSN, RN, CNP, COHN-S, et al.; Julie Louise Gerberding, MD, MPH; and Nicholas S. Kelley, PHD, et al.

You can download the entire issue of the 2013 special edition of South Dakota Medicine (5.97 MB PDF)

Alternatively, you can download single articles by individual authors on the web page.

South Dakota Medicine is a publication of the South Dakota State Medical Association.

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Dr. Art Caplan makes the moral case for mandatory influenza vaccination of healthcare personnel
In his article Morality of Influenza Vaccine Mandates, Art Caplan, PhD, presents compelling reasons why hospitals, long-term care facilities, health systems, and other healthcare facilities have a moral obligation to require healthcare personnel (HCP) to be vaccinated against influenza as a condition of employment. IAC Express readers, particularly those who are considering developing a mandatory influenza vaccination policy at their work site, will find Dr. Caplan’s article informative and useful.

The following four reasons form the core of Dr. Caplan's argument that healthcare facilities are morally required to mandate influenza vaccination of HCP.
  1. Every code of ethics adopted by physicians, nurses, nurses' aides, social workers, pharmacists, and other health care professionals states clearly that patients' interests must come before providers' interests.
     
  2. All healthcare workers are obligated to honor the core medical ethics requirement of “do no harm.” Given the evidence that vaccination can help to prevent disease transmission to patients, the most fundamental moral requirement in all of health care demands that those in caregiving roles treat vaccination as obligatory.
     
  3. Healthcare workers have a duty to vulnerable patients who cannot protect themselves. Newborns, infants, the cognitively impaired elderly, and the seriously immunocompromised can do little to protect themselves against acquiring diseases in hospitals, long-term care facilities, and home care settings.
     
  4. By not being vaccinated, health care workers feed fears about vaccination, reinforce antivaccination sentiments, and set a dismal example for the public.
The article appears in the February 2013 issue of the journal Clinical Therapeutics. Dr. Caplan is director, Division of Medical Ethics, Department of Population Health, NYU Langone Medical Center, New York, NY. Additional videos, journal articles, and online commentaries by Dr. Caplan (links given below) are posted on IAC's Honor Roll for Patient Safety web section.

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IAC HANDOUTS

IAC's screening checklists for vaccine contraindications are now available in Hmong
Hmong-language translations of the following IAC screening checklists for vaccine contraindications are now available. IAC thanks Marshfield Clinic, Marshfield, WI, for the translations.
  1. Screening Checklist for Contraindications to Vaccines for Children and Teens: in Hmong, in English
  2. Screening Checklist for Contraindications to Vaccines for Adults: in Hmong, in English 
  3. Screening Checklist for Contraindications to Inactivated Injectable Influenza Vaccination: in Hmong, in English
  4. Screening Checklist for Contraindications to Live Attenuated Intranasal Influenza Vaccination: in Hmong, in English
IAC offers screening questionnaires in many additional languages, including Spanish, Arabic, Chinese, French, Korean, Russian, Turkish, and Vietnamese.

Related Link
IAC's Handouts for Patients & Staff web section offers healthcare professionals and the public more than 250 FREE English-language handouts (many also available in translation), which we encourage website users to print out, copy, and distribute widely.

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VACCINE INFORMATION STATEMENTS

Pediatric multi-vaccine VIS now available in Armenian, Cambodian, Farsi, Hmong, Korean, and Tagalog, in addition to several other languages
You may use the four-page pediatric multi-vaccine VIS in place of individual two-page VISs whenever you administer routine birth through 6-month vaccines (DTaP, IPV, Hib, hepatitis B, PCV, and rotavirus)  or give combination vaccines (e.g., Pediarix or Comvax). Click on the link above for additional information on the correct use of the multi-vaccine VIS.

IAC recently posted translations of the pediatric multi-vaccine VIS in Armenian, Cambodian, Farsi, Hmong, Korean, and Tagalog. We thank the California Department of Public Health, Immunization Branch, for the translations.
Visit IAC's VIS web section for VISs in more than 35 languages

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FEATURED RESOURCES

Influenza is serious; vaccination is recommended for nearly everyone, so please keep vaccinating your patients
Vaccination remains the single most effective means of preventing influenza. Vaccination is recommended for everyone age 6 months and older, so please continue to vaccinate your patients. If you don't provide influenza vaccination in your clinic, please recommend vaccination to your patients and refer them to the HealthMap Vaccine Finder to locate sites near their workplaces or homes that offer influenza vaccination services.

If you are seeking influenza vaccine for your clinic, check the Influenza Vaccine Availability Tracking System (IVATS), which is a resource for healthcare settings looking to purchase influenza vaccine. The IVATS chart contains information from approved, enrolled, and participating wholesale vaccine distributors or manufacturers of U.S. licensed influenza vaccine. Information is updated on an ongoing basis.

Following is a list of resources related to influenza disease and vaccination for healthcare professionals and the public.
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JOURNAL ARTICLES AND NEWSLETTERS

CDC publishes report on 2012 transmission of vaccinia virus after sexual contact with a smallpox vaccinee
CDC published Secondary and Tertiary Transmission of Vaccinia Virus After Sexual Contact with a Smallpox Vaccinee—San Diego, California, 2012 in the March 1 issue of MMWR (pages 145–147). A press summary of the article is reprinted below.

Unintended transmission of vaccinia virus can occur through contact with civilian and military personnel vaccinated under the U.S. Department of Defense smallpox vaccination program. In this report, sexual contact with a recent smallpox vaccinee led to secondary and tertiary transmission of vaccinia virus in two patients. Vaccinia lesions in the genital and perianal areas resulted in patient illness. The location and number of vaccinia lesions also raised concerns about preventing autoinoculation and local inoculation by clothing and other fomites. Vaccinia immune globulin intravenous (VIGIV) was administered to both patients to prevent worsening, and further spread, of lesions. This report highlights the potential for transmission of vaccinia virus beyond direct sexual contacts of smallpox vaccinees, and the importance of vaccinee compliance with covering the inoculation site. Vaccinia virus can be transmitted to secondary and tertiary sexual contacts of recent smallpox vaccinees who fail to keep the inoculation site covered. VIGIV might be indicated in patients with vaccinia lesions in genital areas to prevent worsening and further spread of lesions.

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NOMINATIONS AND AWARDS

Reminder: March 15 is the nomination deadline for the National Influenza Vaccine Summit's 2013 Immunization Excellence Awards
The National Influenza Vaccine Summit (NIVS) is soliciting candidates for its 2013 NIVS Immunization Excellence Awards. The deadline for submitting a nomination is March 15.

The 2013 awards recognize individuals and organizations that have made extraordinary contributions towards improved adult and/or childhood influenza vaccination rates within their communities during the 2012–2013 influenza season. This year NIVS added an award recognizing immunization activities focused on the adult population, beyond influenza.

A national winner and honorable mention recipient will be selected for each award category. The winners will be given their awards at the National Influenza Vaccine Summit meeting, which will be held in Atlanta on May 14–16. The national winner in each category will be invited to present their programs at the meeting.

There are five categories of recognition:
  • Overall Season Activities
  • Healthcare Personnel Campaign
  • Immunization Coalitions/Public Health/Community Campaign
  • Corporate Campaign
  • Overall Adult Immunization Activities—Beyond Flu
Related Link
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EDUCATION AND TRAINING

Vaccine Education Center plans March 13 webinar on current vaccine issues
The Vaccine Education Center (VEC) at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia will present a free one-hour webinar, beginning at noon (ET) on March 13. Current Issues in Vaccines–Spring 2013 will feature Paul Offit, MD, director of VEC, discussing the following topics:
  • Pertussis: Are vaccine-resistant strains emerging?
  • Influenza: Conceptually different vaccines will be available for 2013–2014
  • HibMenCY: One component is routinely recommended for all infants, the other for high-risk infants. What to do?
  • Pneumococcal vaccine: Update to PCV-13 recommendation
Registration (required) is open now.

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About IAC Express
The Immunization Action Coalition welcomes redistribution of this issue of IAC Express or selected articles. When you do so, please add a note that the Immunization Action Coalition is the source of the material and provide a link to this issue.
If you have trouble receiving or displaying IAC Express messages, visit our online help section.
IAC Express is supported in part by Grant No. U38IP000589 from the National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases, CDC. Its contents are solely the responsibility of IAC and do not necessarily represent the official views of CDC. IAC Express is also supported by educational grants from the following companies: CSL Biotherapies; GlaxoSmithKline; MedImmune, Inc.; Merck Sharp & Dohme Corp.; Novartis Vaccines; Ortho Clinical Diagnostics, Inc.; Pfizer, Inc.; and sanofi pasteur.
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Video of the Week
Video: Medscape News - Vaccine Schedules Are Safe (Pass It On)
Medscape News - Vaccine Schedules Are Safe (Pass It On): Dr. Paul Offit from the Vaccine Education Center at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia talks about a report from the Institute of Medicine (IOM), published on January 16, 2013, looking at the safety of vaccines and the vaccine schedule. The IOM tried to answer the questions, "Is this vaccine schedule, as recommended by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the American Academy of Pediatrics, reasonable? Has it been well tested? Is it safe?"
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Issue Abbreviations
AAFP, American Academy of Family Physicians; AAP, American Academy of Pediatrics; ACIP, Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices; AMA, American Medical Association; CDC, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention; FDA, Food and Drug Administration; IAC, Immunization Action Coalition; MMWR, Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report; NCIRD, National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases; NIVS, National Influenza Vaccine Summit; VIS, Vaccine Information Statement; VPD, vaccine-preventable disease; WHO, World Health Organization.
Publication Staff
Editor: Deborah L. Wexler, MD
Managing Editor: Dale Thompson, MA
Associate Editor: Teresa Anderson, DDS, MPH
Editorial Assistant: Janelle Tangonan Anderson
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This page was reviewed on January 27, 2014
 
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This website is supported in part by a cooperative agreement from the National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases (Grant No. 5U38IP000290) at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in Atlanta, GA. The website content is the sole responsibility of IAC and does not necessarily represent the official views of CDC.