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Issue 1025
IAC Express: Weekly immunization news and information

Issue 1025: November 13, 2012

TOP STORIES

IAC HANDOUTS

FEATURED RESOURCES

JOURNAL ARTICLES AND NEWSLETTERS


TOP STORIES

MMWR announces fourth annual World Pneumonia Day was observed on Monday, November 12
CDC published Announcements: World Pneumonia Day — November 12, 2012 in the November 9 issue of MMWR (page 906). It is reprinted below.

Pneumonia is the leading killer of young children around the world, causing approximately 20% of all child deaths. For countries to reach United Nations Millennium Development Goal 4 of reducing child mortality by two thirds (from 1990 levels) by 2015, interventions to prevent pneumonia deaths need to be implemented. Illness and deaths from pneumonia can be reduced with the use of Streptococcus pneumoniae (pneumococcus), Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib), influenza, and measles vaccines; antimicrobial treatments; and exclusive breast feeding of young infants, among other strategies.

New vaccine introduction to prevent pneumonia in developing countries has had unprecedented momentum over the past few years. Hib vaccines have been introduced or are ready to be introduced in all 71 lowest-income countries eligible for GAVI Alliance funding by 2013, and pneumococcal conjugate vaccines are expected to be introduced in 54 of these countries by 2015. In addition, a study to identify the etiology of pneumonia in developing countries is expected to generate data that will better guide prevention and treatment strategies, especially in countries that already are using Hib and pneumococcal vaccines.

The fourth annual World Pneumonia Day is being observed November 12, 2012, to raise awareness about pneumonia's toll and to promote interventions to protect against, treat, and prevent the disease globally. Activities are being promoted by a coalition of more than 140 community-based organizations, academic institutions, government agencies, and foundations. Visit the World Pneumonia Day website for more information.


Related Links
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IAC Spotlight! Translations of Vaccine Information Statements (VISs) on immunize.org
For healthcare professionals who provide vaccination services to people who don’t speak English, the Immunization Action Coalition (IAC) is the “go-to” spot for translations of VISs. For more than a decade, IAC has made these translations available on immunize.org. VIS translations in up to 40 languages are donated to IAC from generous partners and volunteers. For more than a year, IAC has had a cooperative agreement with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) to support IAC’s role as the official clearinghouse for VIS translations. As a result of this federal funding, IAC provides translations in seven languages for each routinely recommended VIS. The languages we provide (within 30 days of CDC’s release of an English-language VIS) are Related Links If you are interested in becoming a translation partner of IAC, please contact translations@immunize.org. To find out how to provide VIS translations so they can be shared with the world via immunize.org, visit Translate for IAC.

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IAC HANDOUTS

IAC updates "Influenza: Questions and Answers"
IAC recently revised Influenza: Questions and Answers, a handout for patients and parents. Most notably, the information about first-time vaccination of children age 6 months through 8 years was revised.

Related Link
IAC's Handouts for Patients & Staff web section offers healthcare professionals and the public approximately 250 FREE English-language handouts (many also available in translation), which we encourage website users to print out, copy, and distribute widely.

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FEATURED RESOURCES

Vaccine Education Center publishes new materials on the immunization schedule; updates three existing resources
The Vaccine Education Center (VEC) at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia recently released a new fact sheet for parents on the recommended immunization schedule. In addition, VEC created a new product, a cling that's printed on special paper so it can cling to surfaces such as walls and refrigerators without the use of adhesives. The cling, titled Don't let your baby sail on uncharted waters . . . STAY ON COURSE! pictures the immunization schedule for babies age 0–23 months.

To provide additional information supporting the above-mentioned new materials, VEC updated its web section related to the immunization schedule and gave it an easy-to-remember URL: http://vaccine.chop.edu/schedule.  

VEC also updated three fact sheets, one on various facts about childhood vaccines, another on aluminum in vaccines, and another on vaccine ingredients.

Spanish-language versions of the fact sheets on the immunization schedule and aluminum in vaccines are available, as is a Spanish-language version of the cling.

Fact sheets are available online for downloading or can be ordered for $4 per 50-sheet tear pad, plus shipping. Clings are available in multiples of five for $5, plus shipping. Discounts are available for orders of 50 clings and more.

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Influenza vaccination is recommended for nearly everyone, so please vaccinate your patients
Influenza vaccination is recommended for everyone age 6 months and older, so please continue to vaccinate your patients.

If you don't provide influenza vaccination in your clinic, please recommend vaccination to your patients and refer them to the HealthMap Vaccine Finder to locate sites near their workplace or home that offer influenza vaccination services.

Following is a list of resources related to influenza disease and vaccination for healthcare professionals and the public.

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JOURNAL ARTICLES AND NEWSLETTERS

CDC publishes guidance for preventing and controlling certain infectious diseases—including viral hepatitis—in illicit drug users
On November 9, CDC published an MMWR Recommendations and Reports titled Integrated Prevention Services for HIV Infection, Viral Hepatitis, Sexually Transmitted Diseases, and Tuberculosis for Persons Who Use Drugs Illicitly: Summary Guidance from CDC and the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. The summary section is reprinted below.

This report summarizes current (as of 2011) guidelines or recommendations published by multiple agencies of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) for prevention and control of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection, viral hepatitis, sexually transmitted diseases (STDs), and tuberculosis (TB) for persons who use drugs illicitly. It also summarizes existing evidence of effectiveness for practices to support delivery of integrated prevention services. Implementing integrated services for prevention of HIV infection, viral hepatitis, STDs, and TB is intended to provide persons who use drugs illicitly with increased access to services, to improve timeliness of service delivery, and to increase effectiveness of efforts to prevent infectious diseases that share common risk factors, behaviors, and social determinants. This guidance is intended for use by decision makers (e.g., local and federal agencies and leaders and managers of prevention and treatment services), health-care providers, social service providers, and prevention and treatment support groups. Consolidated guidance can strengthen efforts of health-care providers and public health providers to prevent and treat infectious diseases and substance use and mental disorders, use resources efficiently, and improve health-care services and outcomes in persons who use drugs illicitly.

An integrated approach to service delivery for persons who use drugs incorporates recommended science-based public health strategies, including 1) prevention and treatment of substance use and mental disorders; 2) outreach programs; 3) risk assessment for illicit use of drugs; 4) risk assessment for infectious diseases; 5) screening, diagnosis, and counseling for infectious diseases; 6) vaccination; 7) prevention of mother-to-child transmission of infectious diseases; 8) interventions for reduction of risk behaviors; 9) partner services and contact follow-up; 10) referrals and linkage to care; 11) medical treatment for infectious diseases; and 12) delivery of integrated prevention services. These strategies are science-based, public health strategies to prevent and treat infectious diseases, substance use disorders, and mental disorders. Treatment of infectious diseases and treatment of substance use and mental disorders contribute to prevention of transmission of infectious diseases. Integrating prevention services can increase access to and timeliness of prevention and treatment.


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CDC reports on recent progress Nigeria made toward eradicating poliomyelitis
CDC published Progress Toward Poliomyelitis Eradication—
Nigeria, January 2011–September 2012
in the November 9 issue of MMWR (pages 899–904). A press summary of the article is reprinted below.

Continuing wild poliovirus (WPV) transmission in Nigeria poses an ongoing risk for WPV reintroduction into polio-free countries and is a major obstacle to the success of global eradication. Nigeria is one of the three remaining countries (the others are Afghanistan and Pakistan) in which indigenous WPV transmission has never been interrupted. The number of WPV cases in northern Nigeria nearly tripled in 2011 compared with 2010. This was also seen in the first 9 months of 2012 when compared with the same period in 2011. Continuing WPV transmission in Nigeria poses an ongoing risk for WPV reintroduction into polio-free countries and is a major obstacle to the success of global eradication. During 2012, many measures outlined in Nigeria’s 2012 polio eradication emergency plan have been taken and field staffs have been added to improve the planning and performance of vaccine campaigns. While transmission has not been interrupted, campaign quality has started to improve. If WPV case counts and extent of circulation are not reduced substantially by mid-2013, additional innovative strategies to interrupt WPV transmission might need to be considered.

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About IAC Express 
The Immunization Action Coalition welcomes redistribution of this issue of IAC Express or selected articles. When you do so, please add a note that the Immunization Action Coalition is the source of the material and provide a link to this issue.
If you have trouble receiving or displaying IAC Express messages, visit our online help section.
IAC Express is supported in part by Grant No. U38IP000589 from the National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases, CDC. Its contents are solely the responsibility of IAC and do not necessarily represent the official views of CDC. IAC Express is also supported by educational grants from the following companies: Baxter Healthcare Corp.; CSL Biotherapies; GlaxoSmithKline; MedImmune, Inc.; Merck Sharp & Dohme Corp.; Novartis Vaccines; Ortho Clinical Diagnostics, Inc.; Pfizer, Inc.; and sanofi pasteur.
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Video: New ACIP Recommendations for Pneumococcal Vaccination of Adults
New ACIP Recommendations for Pneumococcal Vaccination of Adults: Now on Medscape, CDC expert Tamara Pilishvili, MPH, talks about the new Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) recommendations to give PCV13 to high-risk adults and reviews existing PPSV23 recommendations for adults. This overview is a must-see for every doctor, nurse, and healthcare professional who provides medical care to adults.
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Issue Abbreviations
AAFP, American Academy of Family Physicians; AAP, American Academy of Pediatrics; ACIP, Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices; AMA, American Medical Association; CDC, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention; FDA, Food and Drug Administration; IAC, Immunization Action Coalition; MMWR, Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report; NCIRD, National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases; NIVS, National Influenza Vaccine Summit; VIS, Vaccine Information Statement; VPD, vaccine-preventable disease; WHO, World Health Organization.
Publication Staff
Editor: Deborah L. Wexler, MD
Managing Editor: Dale Thompson, MA
Associate Editor: Teresa Anderson, DDS, MPH
Editorial Assistant: Janelle Tangonan Anderson
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This page was reviewed on November 13, 2012
 
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This website is supported in part by a cooperative agreement from the National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases (Grant No. 5U38IP000290) at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in Atlanta, GA. The website content is the sole responsibility of IAC and does not necessarily represent the official views of CDC.