HOME
ABOUT IAC
CONTACT
A-Z INDEX
DONATE
SHOP
SUBSCRIBE
Immunization Action Coalition
IAC Home
|
IAC Express
|
Issue 1529
Issue 1,529: November 18, 2020
Top Stories

World News

Featured Resources

Education and Training

Conferences and Meetings

On the Lighter Side

 


Top Stories


Developer of second mRNA vaccine candidate against COVID-19 reports positive data at interim analysis of phase 3 trial 

The developer of a messenger RNA (mRNA) vaccine candidate known as mRNA-1273 reported in a November 16 press release that it had been found to be 94.5% effective in preventing COVID-19 in volunteers in a phase 3 trial. That efficacy value is based on the interval 14 days or more after the vaccine’s second dose. Importantly, 11 severe cases occurred in the control group, but none in the vaccinated group. Adverse events (AEs) after mRNA-1273 were generally mild or moderate. Grade 3 events (interfering with normal activities) included fatigue, muscle ache, joint pain, headache, and pain. Further detail will be released in coming weeks. Additional data on efficacy and especially safety continue to be collected.
 
mRNA-1273 was developed by Moderna. Another mRNA vaccine candidate, BNT162b2, developed by BioNTech and Pfizer, reported efficacy >90% on November 9. Other developers, such as CureVac, are evaluating other mRNA vaccines against COVID-19.
 
If these results are independently confirmed, it would mean that the spike protein of the SARS-CoV-2 virus can make COVID-19 vaccine preventable. This would bode well for other vaccine approaches based on the spike protein. This would include adenovirus-vector vaccines conveying the spike protein (being developed by Oxford/AstraZeneca and Johnson & Johnson) and isolated spike proteins in subunit vaccines (being developed by Novavax and Sanofi).
 
Moderna and BioNTech/Pfizer anticipate applying for Emergency Use Authorization (EUA) in the next few weeks. Detailed data packets on each candidate would then be reviewed by FDA’s career scientists, FDA’s Vaccines and Related Biological Products Advisory Committee (VRBPAC), CDC’s career scientists, and CDC’s Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices.

Related Links

Back to top
 


CDC leaders Drs. Nancy Messonnier and Amanda Cohn to present “COVID-19 Vaccination Implementation and the ‘Vaccinate with Confidence’ Strategy” during IAC webinar on December 3 

IAC will host the 1-hour webinar, “COVID-19 Vaccination Implementation,” on December 3 at 1 pm (ET). This important and timely topic will be addressed by key leaders at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Register now to be sure you don’t miss this informative session.
 
CDC Speakers:
  • Dr. Nancy Messonnier, Director, National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases (NCIRD); Director, COVID-19 Vaccine Task Force
  • Dr. Amanda Cohn, Chief Medical Officer, NCIRD and COVID-19 Vaccine Task Force
This presentation will update partners on COVID-19 vaccine planning and implementation. Specific topics include an overview of the SARS-CoV-2 vaccine distribution strategy, current state planning efforts, and the COVID-19 “Vaccinate with Confidence” Strategy.
 
L.J Tan, MS, PhD, IAC’s chief strategy officer will moderate the webinar.
 
The presentations will be followed by a Q&A session with CDC subject matter experts.
 
Please submit questions ahead of time to eocevent417@cdc.gov.
 
Register now to be sure you don’t miss this informative session.

Back to top
 


AMA announces vaccine-specific CPT codes for SARS-CoV-2 vaccines
 
The American Medical Association (AMA) published an update to the Current Procedural Terminology (CPT®) code set that includes new vaccine-specific codes to report vaccinations against the novel coronavirus (SARS-CoV-2). Portions of the press release are reprinted below.

Working closely with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the CPT Editorial Panel has approved a unique CPT code for each of two coronavirus vaccines as well as administration codes unique to each such vaccine. The new CPT codes clinically distinguish each coronavirus vaccine for better tracking, reporting and analysis that supports data-driven planning and allocation. Importantly, these CPT codes are available prior to the public availability of the vaccines to facilitate updating of health care electronic systems across the U.S.

“An effective national immunization program is key to bringing the coronavirus pandemic to an end,” said AMA President Susan R. Bailey, M.D. “Correlating each coronavirus vaccine with its own unique CPT code provides analytical advantages to help track, allocate and optimize resources as an immunization program ramps up in the United States.”


Related Links

Back to top
 


IAC staff featured in CNN article about complexities of distributing SARS-CoV-2 vaccine 

Two IAC staff members, Dr. Kelly Moore, associate director for immunization education, and Laurel Wood, coordinator for public health, were interviewed in a recent CNN article, Pfizer’s Ultra-Cold Vaccine, a ‘Very Complex’ Distribution Plan and an Exploding Head Emoji. Excerpts from the article are reprinted below. 

The article describes the challenges the states and jurisdictions’ immunization programs are facing with the requirements for cold chain storage and distribution. Dr. Moore and Ms. Wood contributed insights from their wealth of practical experience as former state immunization program managers.
 

Back to top
 


IAC Spotlight! IAC’s "Standing Orders Templates for Administering Vaccines" gateway page contains templates and related resources to help healthcare settings improve vaccination rates for patients of all ages

IAC's Standing Orders Templates for Administering Vaccines gateway page on immunize.org contains templates and related resources for vaccines recommended for children, teens, and adults. Use the templates "as is" or modify them to suit your healthcare setting's needs.

Using standing order templates can help you improve vaccination rates. Standing orders authorize nurses, pharmacists, and other appropriately trained healthcare personnel, where allowed by state law, to assess a patient’s immunization status and administer vaccinations according to a protocol approved by a physician, medical director, or other authorized practitioner. Standing orders work by enabling assessment and vaccination of the patient without the need for clinician examination or direct order from the attending provider at the time of the interaction. 



IAC offers 31 standing orders templates for vaccines that are routinely recommended across the lifespan. They are updated as needed and reviewed for technical accuracy by immunization experts at CDC. The current versions can be accessed at www.immunize.org/standing-orders.

Related Links

Back to top
 


Voices for Vaccines releases podcast "Vaccinate the Heartland!," featuring testimonials from senators, a state representative, and a former White House occupant

Voices for Vaccines (VFV) has posted a new entry in its Vax Talk podcast series: Vaccinate the Heartland! During this podcast, folks from across the Midwest (and the U.S.) gathered via a web platform to celebrate all the good vaccination does in the Heartland. Nearly 20 speakers gave quick testimonials about vaccines, from how they protect immunocompromised people to how VPDs have affected their lives. Participants included U.S. Senator Charles Grassley from Iowa, an Ohio state senator, an Illinois state representative, and Chelsea Clinton.

Voices for Vaccines is a national organization of parents and others who are dedicated to raising the level of the voices of immunization supporters. VFV invites everyone who values vaccines to become a member, use VFV tools in their own community, and sign up for VFV’s free newsletter. Please spread the word to your friends and colleagues to join VFV!

Related Links

Back to top
 


Reminder: IAC updates 24 Ask the Experts web pages on immunize.org

IAC’s Ask the Experts includes more than 1,000 questions and answers to common and challenging situations immunization providers face every day. All Ask the Experts questions and answers are periodically reviewed and refreshed as needed, even in the absence of changes in CDC recommendations. The IAC Ask the Experts team recently completed reviews of several frequently visited sections. Visit these pages to find the answers you are looking for! 

Vaccine-specific reviewed sections:

Topic-specific reviewed sections:

Explore all IAC's Ask the Experts questions and answers by clicking on the graphic below and bookmarking this valuable resource.



IAC’s team of experts includes Kelly L. Moore, MD, MPH (lead); Carolyn Bridges, MD, FACP; William Atkinson, MD, MPH; and Deborah Wexler, MD.

Back to top
 


With more than 170 million doses of flu vaccine shipped across America, it’s now up to you. Make sure all your patients are vaccinated!

CDC expects flu activity to increase in the coming weeks. With more than 170 million doses of flu vaccine distributed across the U.S., flu vaccine is readily available. Visit the CDC’s Weekly U.S. Influenza Surveillance Report, FluView, for details.

Influenza vaccination is recommended for everyone 6 months of age and older, so please continue to vaccinate all your patients across this age span. If you don’t provide influenza vaccine at your site, please give strong recommendations and refer to sites that do vaccinate.

Boston Children’s Hospital, in partnership with CDC, has developed VaccineFinder, a user-friendly website to help adult and pediatric patients find flu and other vaccines. Participating providers can now update supply estimates on VaccineFinder for a more accurate reporting. For questions or more information, contact vaccine@healthmap.org.



Related Links

Back to top
 


Three additional universities require flu vaccine to protect staff and students—good news for more campuses!

Many colleges and universities across the nation are mandating flu vaccine for staff and students. IAC has recently become aware of three additional schools that require influenza vaccine this year: Carleton College, Denison University, and Montclair State University.

In addition, the following schools require influenza vaccine this year: Indiana University—nine campuses, University of California system—ten campuses, University of Tennessee system—four campuses, Albion College, Butler University, Colby College, Columbia University, Cornell University, Creighton University, Dordt University, Duke University, Elon University, Johns Hopkins University, Marist CollegeMcDaniel College, Notre Dame, Pepperdine University, Purdue University, Rochester Institute of Technology, Rosalind Franklin University, Syracuse University, University of Dayton, University of Denver, University of Kentucky, University of Miami, University of North Carolina Charlotte, University of Pennsylvania, University of Southern California, Wabash College, Wake Forest University, Washington University in St. Louis, and Wayne State University.

Under a new statewide regulation in Massachusetts, approximately 115 colleges and universities are implementing requirements for influenza vaccination this year. 

If you know of additional colleges or universities that require influenza vaccination, please send the name of the institution, as well as a link to the relevant policy (if available) to admin@immunize.org.

Back to top
 


Not-to-miss immunization articles in the news

These recent articles convey the potential risks of vaccine-preventable diseases and the importance of vaccination.

COVID-19

Influenza

Other

Back to top
 


Stay up to date on the latest coronavirus information 

CDC, NIH, WHO, and Johns Hopkins are closely monitoring the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic. Check the resources below for the latest information. Stay in touch with your local and state health departments. 

Related Links

Back to top
 


World News


CDC and WHO report on stalled progress toward measles elimination worldwide in this week's MMWR and Weekly Epidemiological Record
 
CDC published Progress Toward Regional Measles Elimination—Worldwide, 2000–2019 in the November 13 issue of MMWR. On the same day, WHO's Weekly Epidemiological Record published a similar article titled Progress Towards Regional Measles Elimination—Worldwide, 2000–2019. A media summary of the MMWR article is reprinted below.

Progress toward measles elimination targets has stalled leading to the highest number of new infections reported in 23 years (during 2017–2019) and a tragic rise in measles deaths. Measles vaccination has saved more than 25.5 million lives globally since 2000, but progress has stalled leading to record-high increases in the number of new infections and measles deaths. New data show worldwide measles deaths climbed 50% from 2016 to 2019 claiming an estimated 207,500 lives in 2019, all preventable deaths. Reported measles cases in 2019 represents the highest number reported (869,770) in 23 years, with increases in all WHO regions. Of the 184 countries reporting 2019 data, just nine countries accounted for 73% of all reported measles cases worldwide. To regain progress, countries must reach and maintain ≥95% coverage with measles-containing vaccine, quickly identify missed children, and close growing immunity gaps due to recent disruptions in immunization services during the COVID-19 pandemic. 

Access the MMWR article in PDF format or in HTML format.

Related Links

Back to top
 


CDC and WHO report on difficulties with routine vaccination coverage worldwide in this week's MMWR and Weekly Epidemiological Record 

CDC published Routine Vaccination Coverage—Worldwide, 2019 in the November 13 issue of MMWR. On the same day, WHO's Weekly Epidemiological Record published a similar article titled Routine Vaccination Coverage—Worldwide, 2019. Portions of a media summary of the MMWR article appear below.

Though large gains in immunization coverage were achieved during 2000–2010, coverage with established vaccines has not increased since 2010 and progress is uneven around the globe. During 2010–2019, the number of zero-dose children (infants not receiving the first dose of diphtheria, tetanus, and pertussis-containing vaccine) increased in the Americas, African, and Western Pacific regions. Disruptions to global vaccination efforts due to the COVID-19 pandemic has further threatened progress towards achieving global immunization goals. 

Access the MMWR article in PDF format or in HTML format.

Related Links

Back to top
 


Featured Resources


In IAC’s “Video of the Week,” Stanford Medicine dreams of a safe COVID-19 vaccine

Dreaming of a Safe COVID-19 Vaccine is a touching, animated video from Stanford Medicine that depicts friends and family in masks and bubbles during the pandemic. The video reminds us about how our lives would improve once there is a safe and effective COVID-19 vaccine. Meanwhile, it reminds us, we need to wear masks, wash our hands, keep our distance, and get a flu shot. Runtime is 3:59. 

 

Visit the VOTW archive.

Back to top
 


IAC's bright red "FLU VACCINE" buttons and stickers will help you keep vaccinating against flu. Order today!

IAC “FLU VACCINE” buttons and stickers are flying out of our office by the thousands! More than a half-million stickers already shipped this year! Their bright red color helps broadcast your important message about the need for flu vaccination. And the cost is nominal.



“FLU VACCINE” BUTTONS

The button measures 1.25" across and carries a bold message! Pin on lab coats, uniforms, other clothing, tote bags, or backpacks to show support for flu vaccine.
 
Buttons are delivered in bags of 10 buttons per bag.

Click here for pricing and ordering information for "FLU VACCINE" buttons.

“FLU VACCINE” STICKERS
 
Measuring 1.5" across, these stickers adhere well to clothing and have an easy-peel-off backing.

Stickers are delivered to you cut individually (not on rolls)—available in bundles of 100. 

Click here for pricing and ordering information for “FLU VACCINE” stickers.

Visit Shop IAC for additional items, including "Vaccines Save Lives" enamel pins, patient record cards, and a vaccine administration training video.

Back to top
 


IAC’s “Vaccination and COVID-19” gateway page offers a collection of tools from many organizations to sustain routine vaccination services during the pandemic

IAC’s Vaccination and COVID-19 gateway page assists healthcare professionals who are faced with challenges in providing routine and catch-up vaccination during the COVID-19 pandemic. At this gateway, IAC has assembled key links to help both new and experienced vaccinators deliver safe, effective vaccination to people of all ages, applicable in typical and nontraditional vaccination settings.

The site facilitates access to key pandemic resource pages from major clinical and public health organizations involved in immunization. The page will be updated frequently with new links and resources specific to catch-up vaccination, so be sure to check back regularly.  

 

To easily locate this gateway page from anywhere on immunize.org, go to the light blue band of tabs across the top, choose the "Clinic Tools" tab, and then select "Vaccination and COVID-19” from the drop-down menu. To link directly to the site, go to www.immunize.org/vax-and-covid-19. You also can use the Guide to immunize.org at the bottom of every web page.
 
Related Links

Back to top
 


IAC's comprehensive Vaccinating Adults: A Step-by-Step Guide is available for free download either by chapter or in its entirety (142 pages)

Download IAC's free book on all aspects of adult immunization, to help train your team and refresh your leaders: Vaccinating Adults: A Step-by-Step Guide (Guide).

 

This up-to-date, thorough "how to" guide on adult immunization provides easy-to-use, practical information covering essential adult immunization activities. It helps vaccine providers enhance their existing adult immunization services or introduce them into any clinical setting.

In addition, the Guide is filled with hundreds of web addresses and references to help providers stay up to date on the latest immunization information, both now and in the future.

The Guide is available to download/print either by chapter or in its entirety free at www.immunize.org/guide. The downloaded version is suitable for double-sided printing. The National Vaccine Program Office and CDC both supported the development of the Guide and provided early technical review.

The Guide is a uniquely valuable resource to assist providers in increasing adult vaccination rates. Be sure to get a copy today!

Related Links

Back to top
 


Public television documentary Protecting Health: Saving Lives features 30-year history of IAC. Please share.

The award-winning public television documentary series, Visionaries, hosted by Sam Waterston, features IAC in the episode Protecting Health: Saving Lives. This 30-minute film showcases IAC’s founder and executive director Dr. Deborah Wexler’s commitment to supporting the nation’s healthcare professionals with immunization education information and materials. Protecting Health: Saving Lives makes a powerful case for vaccination, addressing and defusing the fears that fuel the antivaccine movement, presenting stories of vaccine-preventable disease, and recognizing the science that has saved millions of lives through vaccination.

Protecting Health: Saving Lives is premiering on more than 100 local PBS stations nationwide in the months ahead, but you can watch it right now on IAC’s website at www.immunize.org/aboutus/iac-film-history.asp. We’d very much appreciate your circulating the film by sharing this link with your colleagues and friends through member newsletters, e-mail listservs, social media channels, conferences and web-based events, and web pages.

 

Sharing Protecting Health: Saving Lives is easy! Just go to https://www.immunize.org/aboutus/iac-film-history.asp or click on the film's image in the right column of IAC's immunize.org main page. Click the “share” button, and choose the social media site where you’d like your friends, family, and colleagues to view the film.
 
To learn more about the public television Visionaries series, visit www.visionaries.org.

Back to top
 


Education and Training

National Academy of Medicine and American Public Health Association host "COVID-19 Vaccine Update: Development, Approval, Allocation and Distribution in the U.S." on November 18

The National Academy of Medicine and American Public Health Association will offer a webinar titled COVID-19 Vaccine Update: Development, Approval, Allocation and Distribution in the U.S. on November 18 at 5:00 p.m. (ET). This interactive webinar will discuss the path to a COVID-19 vaccine, including steps forward in development, approval, allocation, and distribution in the U.S.
 
Register for the webinar.

Back to top
 


Conferences and Meetings

Watch the virtual ACIP meeting on November 23; no registration is required

A live, virtual meeting of the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) will be held on November 23. The agenda (including times) will be posted soon and is expected to feature COVID-19 vaccination. No registration is required to watch the live November ACIP meeting or listen via telephone. 

Related Link

  • ACIP gateway page for recordings and content from previous meetings, as well as information about future meetings

Back to top
 


On the Lighter Side

In this 1976 PSA from the New York State Department of Health, "Piano Man" promotes getting your flu shot!

In this nostalgic look at vaccine advocacy 44 years ago, an entertaining “piano man” sings to listeners, reminding them to get their flu shots. Produced by the New York Department of Health in 1976, it is part of a PSA collection curated by vaccine expert William L. Atkinson, MD, MPH. Run time is 30 seconds.



Previous PSAs mentioned in “On the Lighter Side” are available when viewing this Vimeo video

Back to top

About IAC Express
The Immunization Action Coalition welcomes redistribution of this issue of IAC Express or selected articles. When you do so, please add a note that the Immunization Action Coalition is the source of the material and provide a link to this issue.

IAC Express is supported in part by Grant No. 6NH23IP922550 from the National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases, CDC. Its contents are solely the responsibility of IAC and do not necessarily represent the official views of CDC.

IAC Express Disclaimer
ISSN: 1526-1786

Our mailing address:
Immunization Action Coalition
2550 University Avenue West, Suite 415 North
Saint Paul, MN 55114
Subscribe today to IAC Express: the up-to-date immunization information you need
IAC Express
IAC Express Home
2021 Issues
2020 Issues: July - December
2020 Issues: January - June
2019 Issues: July - December
2019 Issues: January - June
2018 Issues
20171997 Issues
Coronavirus (COVID-19) Information from IAC
Video of the Week
What You Should Know about the Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 Vaccine: In this Mayo Clinic Insights video, Melanie Swift, MD, explains how the Janssen (J&J) adenovirus vector vaccine is built. She explains that only one dose is needed and that this vaccine is very effective, especially considering it was studied in places where variant viruses were circulating.
Visit the VOTW archive
immunize.org homepage
Shop IAC
Follow Us
Follow IAC on Facebook
Follow IAC on Twitter
Follow IAC on YouTube
Read Dr. Wexler's monthly column for practical advice on vaccination topics
COVID-19 buttons and stickers
Try IAC's Facebook Frame
Vaccinating Adults:
A Step-by-Step Guide
Vaccinating Adults: A Step-by-Step Guide
IAC's 142-page book available for free download.
Calendar of Events
Conferences, meetings, and training opportunities
Conferences, meetings, and training opportunities
Patient Record Cards
Purchase IAC's patient record cards today!
Record cards for patients – child and teen, adult, and lifetime – are printed on durable paper and sized to fit in a wallet when folded
DVD Immunization Techniques
Purchase Immunization Techniques DVD
Every practice should have this award winning, "how-to" training video
Protect Newborns Guidebook
Protect Newborns Guidebook
Comprehensive guide Hepatitis B: What Hospitals Need to Do to Protect Newborns
Editorial Information
Editor
Deborah L. Wexler, MD
Associate Editors
John D. Grabenstein, RPh, PhD
Sharon Humiston, MD, MPH
Consulting Editors
Taryn Chapman, MS
Marian Deegan, JD
Courtnay Londo, MA
Technical Editor
Robin VanOss
 
- Guide to immunize.org -
A-Z INDEX
ABOUT IAC
IAC in the News
Staff
IAC History through Film
ACIP
RECOMMENDATIONS
ADOLESCENT VACCINATION
ADULT VACCINATION
ADULT VACCINATION GUIDE
ASK THE EXPERTS
Administering Vaccines
COVID-19
COVID-19 & Routine Vac
Hepatitis B
MMR
Storage and Handling
>> view all
BECKY PAYNE AWARD
BILLING & CODING
BIRTH DOSE GUIDEBOOK
CALENDAR OF EVENTS
CDC INFORMATION
CDC SCHEDULES
CLINIC TOOLS
Administering Vaccines
Adolescent Vaccination
Adult Vaccination
Screening for Contraindications
Storage & Handling
Vaccination and COVID-19
Vaccine Recommendations
>> view all
COALITIONS FOR
IMMUNIZATION
CONTRIBUTE TO IAC
COVID-19 RELATED
Ask the Experts: COVID-19
Ask the Experts: COVID-19
   & Routine Vac
Clinic Tools: Vaccination and
   COVID-19
Repository of Resources
Vaccines: COVID-19
DEAR COLLEAGUE LETTERS
16-year-old Visit
HPV
MenACWY Dose #2
DONATE TO IAC
EDUCATIONAL MATERIALS
EMAIL NEWS SERVICES
E-NEWSLETTER: IAC EXPRESS
EXEMPTIONS
FAQs
FAVORITES
FDA PACKAGE INSERTS
FILMS ABOUT IAC
GIVE BIRTH TO THE
END OF HEP B
HANDOUTS FOR
PATIENTS & STAFF
View All Materials
Administering Vaccines
Adolescent Vaccination
Adult Vaccination
Contraindications / Precautions
Documenting Vaccination
Healthcare Personnel
Managing Vaccine Reactions
Parent Handouts
Pregnancy and Vaccines
Q&As: Diseases and Vaccines
Q&As: Easy-to-Read
Schedules for Patients
Screening Checklists
Standing Orders Templates
Storage & Handling
Strategies & Policies
Temperature Logs
Top Handouts
Vaccine Confidence
Vaccine Recommendations
>> view all
HEP B BIRTH DOSE
HONOR ROLLS
Hep B Birth Dose
Mandatory Flu Vaccination for HCP
MenB Vaccination for Colleges
IAC EXPRESS
Subscribe to IAC Express
IMAGE LIBRARY
LAWS AND MANDATES
MANUFACTURERS
MASS VACCINATION
RESOURCES
NATIONAL ADULT &
INFLUENZA
IMMUNIZATION SUMMIT
NEWS & INFORMATION
NEWSLETTER SIGN UP
OFFICIAL RELEASES
ACIP
CDC
FDA
PACKAGE INSERTS
PARTNERS
PHARMACISTS
PHOTOS
POWERPOINT SLIDE SETS
PREGNANCY AND
VACCINES
PRESS ROOM
PROTECT NEWBORNS
FROM HEP B
PUBLICATIONS
IAC Express
Vaccinating Adults:
   A Step-by-Step Guide
Hepatitis B What Hospitals
   Need to Do to
   Protect Newborns
Needle Tips Archive
Vaccinate Adults Archive
Vaccinate Women Archive
REGISTRIES
SCHOOL VACCINATION REQUIREMENTS
SHOP IAC
DVD Immunization Techniques
Laminated Schedules
Patient Record Cards
Flu Vaccine Buttons and Stickers
"Vaccines Save Lives" Pins
SITE MAP
SLIDE SETS
STANDING ORDERS
STATE INFORMATION
Immunization Websites
Laws and Mandates for School Entry
Immunization Program Managers
SUBSCRIBE TO IAC EXPRESS
SUPPORT IAC
TALKING ABOUT VACCINES
Adjuvants & Ingredients
Autism
Importance of Vaccination
MMR Vaccine
Religious Concerns
Vaccine Safety
>> view all
TECHNICALLY SPEAKING
TRANSLATIONS
IAC Handouts
VISs
TRAVEL (INTERNATIONAL)
UNPROTECTED PEOPLE
STORIES
Chickenpox
Hepatitis B
Measles
Whooping Cough
>> view all
VACCINATING ADULTS:
A STEP-BY-STEP GUIDE
VACCINE INFORMATION
STATEMENTS
Translations
VACCINE
MANUFACTURERS
VACCINE POLICY &
LICENSURE
ACIP
FDA
WHO
VACCINE SAFETY
VACCINE TIMELINE
VACCINES
COVID-19
Hepatitis B
HPV (Human papillomavirus)
Influenza
Pertussis
Varicella
>> view all
VIDEO OF THE WEEK
VIDEO LIBRARY
VISs
Translations
WHAT'S NEW OR UPDATED AT IAC
Handouts
VISs and Translations
Web Pages
 
Immunization Action Coalition  •  2550 University Avenue West  •  Suite 415 North  •  Saint Paul, Minnesota  •  55114
tel 651-647-9009  •  fax 651-647-9131
 
 
 
This website is supported in part by a cooperative agreement from the National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases (Grant No. 6NH23IP22550) at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in Atlanta, GA. The website content is the sole responsibility of IAC and does not necessarily represent the official views of CDC.