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Issue 995
IAC Express: Weekly immunization news and information
Issue 995: May 22, 2012

TOP STORIES

VACCINE INFORMATION STATEMENTS

OFFICIAL RELEASES AND ANNOUNCEMENTS

FEATURED RESOURCES

JOURNAL ARTICLES AND NEWSLETTERS

EDUCATION AND TRAINING




TOP STORIES

New: May 2012 issue of Vaccinate Adults is now online
The May 2012 issue of Vaccinate Adults is now online. This issue presents an array of materials that healthcare professionals can rely on to vaccinate adults. Readers will find the recently published 2012 U.S. immunization schedule for adults; a tribute to retiring CDC immunization expert William Atkinson, MD, MPH; a new handout for patients to help them find old immunization records, and much more.

Note: Vaccinate Adults is an abbreviated version of Needle Tips with the pediatric content removed.

The issue also includes the "Ask the Experts" column from CDC medical epidemiologist Andrew T. Kroger, MD, MPH; nurse educator Donna L. Weaver, RN, MN; medical officer Iyabode Akinsanya-Beysolow, MD, MPH; and medical epidemiologist William L. Atkinson, MD, MPH.
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Reminder: May issue of Needle Tips available online
The May 2012 issue of Needle Tips is now online.
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Spotlight on immunize.org: nine more healthcare organizations join IAC's Honor Roll
IAC encourages qualifying healthcare organizations to apply for its Honor Roll for Patient Safety. The honor roll recognizes hospitals, medical practices, professional organizations, and government entities that have taken a stand for patient safety by implementing mandatory influenza vaccination policies for healthcare workers. More than 200 organizations are now enrolled.

Since March 20, when IAC Express last reported on the Honor Roll for Patient Safety, the following nine healthcare organizations have been enrolled.

Healthcare organizations
Colorado Mental Health Institute at Pueblo, Pueblo, CO; Pediatric Associates P.S.C., Crestview Hills, KY; Children's Mercy Hospital, Kansas City, MO; BryanLGH Medical Center, Lincoln, NE; St. Mary's Regional Medical Center, Enid, OK; HCA-Centennial Medical Center, Nashville, TN; Parkland Health and Hospital System, Dallas, TX; Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital, Plano, TX; and Texas Health Resources, Arlington, TX.

Related Links
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Report suggests viral hepatitis infections were possibly associated with healthcare delivery in New York City
CDC published Investigation of Viral Hepatitis Infections Possibly Associated with Health-Care Delivery—New York City, 2008–2011 in the May 18 issue of MMWR (pages 333–338). A press summary of the article is reprinted below.

An approach to investigating potential cases of health care-related transmission of hepatitis B virus (HBV) or hepatitis C virus (HCV) that has been developed by the New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene (NYC DOHMH) may provide a useful resource to other health departments working to establish their own protocols. Potential transmission of HBV and HCV in health care settings is of particular concern, and investigations into cases of possible transmission when they occur are critical to identify unsafe practices and avoid future transmission. However, such investigations are resource-intensive and can overwhelm health departments. To help guide the public health response to possible cases of health care-related HBV and HCV transmission in New York City, the NYC DOHMH has developed an approach that prioritizes carrying out the least resource-intensive activities for each suspected case, such as conducting initial patient and physician interviews. Based on these initial findings, decisions to expand the investigation are made based on how likely the case represents part of a larger cluster of transmission; full investigations may include on-site visits to the medical practice, testing for other patients, analysis of blood specimens, and broad notification to other patients. Authors use two case reports to illustrate the NYC DOHMH approach.

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Report indicates outbreaks of hepatitis B virus infection were related to assisted blood glucose monitoring
CDC published Multiple Outbreaks of Hepatitis B Virus Infection Related to Assisted Monitoring of Blood Glucose Among Residents of Assisted Living Facilities—Virginia, 2009–2011 in the May 18 issue of MMWR (pages 339–343). A press summary of the article is reprinted below.

Outbreaks of hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection among residents of four assisted living facilities (ALF) in Virginia underscore the importance of hepatitis surveillance in detecting outbreaks as well as the critical need for proper infection control in these settings. Between February 2009 and November 2011, the Virginia Department of Health (VDH) was notified through routine viral hepatitis surveillance of cases of acute HBV infection among residents in four separate ALF in the central region of Virginia. Upon receipt of these case reports, VDH, along with the local health departments and CDC, conducted thorough investigations to determine whether the infections resulted from possible transmission among residents. Testing of residents at these facilities identified a total of 31 acute HBV infections; all were among residents receiving assisted monitoring of blood glucose for management of diabetes. Lapses in infection control practices were observed at three of the four facilities. The authors note that this highlights the important role of health departments in identifying unsafe practices and implementing appropriate infection control measures to avoid future transmission. Other interventions that are critical in these settings include appropriate HBV vaccination for those at risk, improved infection control oversight and appropriate staff training, and prompt investigation of acute HBV infections to detect future outbreaks.

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VACCINE INFORMATION STATEMENTS

IAC posts Thai and Turkish translations of the MMR vaccine VIS
IAC recently posted the VIS for MMR vaccine in Thai and Turkish. IAC thanks Asian Pacific Health Care Venture, Los Angeles, for the Thai translation, and Mustafa Kozanoglu, MD, Adana, Turkey, for the Turkish translation.
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OFFICIAL RELEASES AND ANNOUNCEMENTS

CDC announces that May is Hepatitis Awareness Month, and May 19 is National Hepatitis Testing Day
CDC published Hepatitis Awareness Month and National Hepatitis Testing Day—May 2012 in the May 18 issue of MMWR (page 333). The announcement informs readers that this is the seventeenth annual anniversary of Hepatitis Awareness Month, and May 19 is the first National Hepatitis Testing Day. It also mentions that in 2011 the Department of Health and Human Services developed Combating the Silent Epidemic of Viral Hepatitis, a comprehensive viral hepatitis action plan for improving viral hepatitis prevention, care, and treatment.

Related Link
  • To increase the number of people who get tested for viral hepatitis, CDC has launched a new online Hepatitis Risk Assessment tool
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CDC to issue draft guidelines proposing that all baby boomers get a one-time test for hepatitis C infection
On May 18, CDC issued a press release titled CDC Announces First Ever National Hepatitis Testing Day and Proposes that All Baby Boomers Be Tested Once for Hepatitis C. Excerpts from the press release are reprinted below.

On the eve of the first ever National Hepatitis Testing Day (May 19), the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is issuing draft guidelines proposing that all U.S. baby boomers get a one-time test for the hepatitis C virus. One in 30 baby boomers—the generation born from 1945 through 1965—has been infected with hepatitis C, and most don’t know it. Hepatitis C causes serious liver diseases including liver cancer, which is the fastest-rising cause of cancer-related deaths, and the leading cause of liver transplants in the United States.

CDC believes this approach will address the largely preventable consequences of this disease, especially in light of newly available therapies that can cure up to 75 percent of infections. . . .

More than 2 million U.S. baby boomers are infected with hepatitis C, accounting for more than 75 percent of all American adults living with the virus. . . .

CDC estimates one-time hepatitis C testing of baby boomers could identify more than 800,000 additional people with hepatitis C, prevent the costly consequences of liver cancer and other chronic liver diseases, and save more than 120,000 lives.


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IOM seeks public comment on paper about safety evaluation of different childhood immunization schedules
The Institute of Medicine (IOM) seeks public comment on a paper titled Study Designs for the Safety Evaluation of Different Childhood Immunization Schedules. The comment period is open from May 14 to May 31. An online form is available for comments.

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FEATURED RESOURCES

Updated edition of The Forgotten Story includes new accounts of the dangers of vaccine-preventable diseases
Behind each person who has contracted a vaccine-preventable disease is the story of a life interrupted, of a family devastated. Vaccine-Preventable Disease: The Forgotten Story portrays families who have suffered the true cost of not vaccinating. Texas Children's Hospital has published an updated edition with five new stories profiling families who have dealt with the effects of vaccine-preventable diseases.

Associated tear-pads are available on pertussis and meningitis. Associated posters are available in English and Spanish on influenza, measles, pertussis, varicella, and HPV. There is also an abbreviated Spanish-language version of the book that includes stories on influenza, pertussis, HPV, and meningococcal meningitis. Information on the updated edition and associated materials is available at the link above.

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Vaccine Confidence Project launches new website
The Vaccine Confidence Project at the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine recently announced the launch of its new website. It features basic information on the project’s objectives, partners, and research work, as well as regularly updated highlights of daily vaccine news, new research papers, and a weekly "Confidence Commentary" by the project leader, Heidi Larson, PhD. In the coming months, the website will be developed and expanded to become an essential resource for those interested in vaccine confidence and the way in which public concerns are heard and responded to.

The Vaccine Confidence Project was formed to build a multi-disciplinary network of biomedical scientists, decision scientists, psychologists, and social scientists to examine the influences and decision-making processes as individuals around the world, including health professionals, decide whether to immunize themselves or their children. Its goal is to further the efficiency of immunization programs in improving population health and well-being.

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New national campaign aims to end hepatitis B in high-risk Asian American and Pacific Islander populations
On May 15, the Association of Asian Pacific Community Health Organizations, the Hepatitis B Foundation, and partner organizations announced the launch of the Hep B United campaign. It aims to bring attention and action to ending hepatitis B, especially among high-risk Asian American and Pacific Islander populations in the United States. The campaign was undertaken with the support of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services’ Office of Minority Health.

The newly launched Hep B United website offers a variety of hepatitis B resources, including links to Asian-language brochures, fact sheets, and websites. It also provides information on local campaigns developed by community-based hepatitis B groups across the country and resources for getting involved at local and national levels.

Related Links
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JOURNAL ARTICLES AND NEWSLETTERS

CDC publishes report on progress toward worldwide interruption of polio from January 2011 to March 2012
CDC published Progress Toward Interruption of Wild Poliovirus Transmission—Worldwide, January 2011–March 2012 in the May 18 issue of MMWR (pages 353–357). A press summary of the article is reprinted below.

Despite setbacks, there was progress toward polio eradication in 2011. Reported wild polio virus (WPV) cases decreased 52 percent worldwide in 2011. Cases in India reduced more than 98 percent, with the last identified case in January 2011; the country has been considered polio-free since February 2012. WPV type 3 cases declined 31 percent globally in 2011. Cases increased in 2011 in Afghanistan, Nigeria, and Pakistan. Outbreaks continued to occur because of importation from polio-reservoir countries to polio-free areas; 11 different outbreaks occurred in China and in eight polio-free countries in Africa during 2011. During January–March 2012, all WPV cases were reported from Afghanistan, Chad, Nigeria, and Pakistan. Persistent WPV circulation in 2012, particularly in Nigeria and Pakistan, poses an ongoing threat to eradication efforts. Current efforts are also threatened by shortages in funds. Global polio eradication can be completed on schedule if polio-affected countries and countries at risk of poliovirus outbreaks fully and urgently implement their national emergency plans that incorporate mechanisms for increased accountability.

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EDUCATION AND TRAINING

American College of Physicians' webinar on communicating risks and benefits of vaccination to be held July 18
The American College of Physicians has scheduled a webinar on communicating the risks and benefits of vaccination to patients on July 18 at noon ET. Registrations (required) are now being accepted.

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About IAC Express 
The Immunization Action Coalition welcomes redistribution of this issue of IAC Express or selected articles. When you do so, please add a note that the Immunization Action Coalition is the source of the material and provide a link to this issue.
If you have trouble receiving or displaying IAC Express messages, visit our online help section.
IAC Express is supported in part by Grant No. U38IP000589 from the National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases, CDC. Its contents are solely the responsibility of IAC and do not necessarily represent the official views of CDC. IAC Express is also supported by educational grants from the following companies: Baxter Healthcare Corp.; CSL Biotherapies; GlaxoSmithKline; MedImmune, Inc.; Merck Sharp & Dohme Corp.; Novartis Vaccines; Ortho Clinical Diagnostics, Inc.; Pfizer, Inc.; and sanofi pasteur.
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Video of the Week
Video: AAP's Risk Communication Series:
AAP's Risk Communication Series: Understanding risk communication theory and having tools such as the CASE model encourages fruitful discussion with families about their vaccine safety concerns. The series of videos introduce risk communication and the CASE model, role play two examples of the CASE model in action, and provide feedback on each of the scenarios. These can be viewed individually or as part of a larger group for discussion.
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Issue Abbreviations
AAFP, American Academy of Family Physicians; AAP, American Academy of Pediatrics; ACIP, Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices; AMA, American Medical Association; CDC, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention; FDA, Food and Drug Administration; IAC, Immunization Action Coalition; MMWR, Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report; NCIRD, National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases; NIVS, National Influenza Vaccine Summit; VIS, Vaccine Information Statement; VPD, vaccine-preventable disease; WHO, World Health Organization.
Publication Staff
Editor: Deborah L. Wexler, MD
Managing Editor: Dale Thompson, MA
Associate Editor: Teresa Anderson, DDS, MPH
Editorial Assistant: Janelle Tangonan Anderson
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This page was reviewed on January 27, 2014
 
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This website is supported in part by a cooperative agreement from the National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases (Grant No. 5U38IP000290) at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in Atlanta, GA. The website content is the sole responsibility of IAC and does not necessarily represent the official views of CDC.