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Immunization Action Coalition

IAC Express 2011

Issue number 930: May 23, 2011

Please click here to subscribe to IAC Express as well as other FREE IAC periodicals.
Contents of this Issue
Select a title to jump to the article.
  1. Decline in vaccine-preventable diseases called one of the decade's great U.S. public health achievements
  2. FDA approves adenovirus type 4 and type 7 vaccine for use in military personnel ages 17 through 50 years
  3. Washington state law requires parents to get information on the benefits and risks of immunization
  4. IAC updates its patient-education handout "Reliable Sources of Immunization Information"
  5. IAC updates the provider-education handout "Need Help Responding to Vaccine-Hesitant Parents?"
  6. IAC's Video of the Week features "Crying Baby Symphony," a light-hearted look at babies leading healthier lives because of vaccination
  7. CDC offers a user-friendly child-and-teen vaccination schedule for parents
  8. Spotlight on immunize.org: IAC provides resources and vaccination information on hepatitis A and B
  9. ANA confers its April 2011 Immunity Award on Patricia Stinchfield, MS, RN, CPNP
  10. IAC's popular laminated versions of the 2011 U.S. immunization schedules are now available. Order a supply for your workplace today!
  11. CDC's 2009 Surveillance Summary on the health status of minority communities includes information on influenza and pneumococcal vaccination
  12. VISs for hepatitis B and Td/Tdap vaccines now available in Indonesian
 
Abbreviations
AAFP, American Academy of Family Physicians; AAP, American Academy of Pediatrics; ACIP, Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices; AMA, American Medical Association; CDC, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention; FDA, Food and Drug Administration; IAC, Immunization Action Coalition; MMWR, Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report; NCIRD, National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases; NIVS, National Influenza Vaccine Summit; VIS, Vaccine Information Statement; VPD, vaccine-preventable disease; WHO, World Health Organization.
  
Issue 930: May 23, 2011
1.  Decline in vaccine-preventable diseases called one of the decade's great U.S. public health achievements

CDC published "Ten Great Public Health Achievements--United States, 2001-2010" in the May 20 issue of MMWR. The section titled Vaccine-Preventable Disease is reprinted below.


The past decade has seen substantial declines in cases, hospitalizations, deaths, and healthcare costs associated with vaccine-preventable diseases. New vaccines (i.e., rotavirus, quadrivalent meningococcal conjugate, herpes zoster, pneumococcal conjugate, and human papillomavirus vaccines, as well as tetanus, diphtheria, and acellular pertussis vaccine for adults and adolescents) were introduced, bringing to 17 the number of diseases targeted by U.S. immunization policy. A recent economic analysis indicated that vaccination of each U.S. birth cohort with the current childhood immunization schedule prevents approximately 42,000 deaths and 20 million cases of disease, with net savings of nearly $14 billion in direct costs and $69 billion in total societal costs.

The impact of two vaccines has been particularly striking. Following the introduction of pneumococcal conjugate vaccine, an estimated 211,000 serious pneumococcal infections and 13,000 deaths were prevented during 2000-2008. Routine rotavirus vaccination, implemented in 2006, now prevents an estimated 40,000-60,000 rotavirus hospitalizations each year. Advances also were made in the use of older vaccines, with reported cases of hepatitis A, hepatitis B, and varicella at record lows by the end of the decade. Age-specific mortality (i.e., deaths per million population) from varicella for persons age <20 years, declined by 97% from 0.65 in the prevaccine period (1990-1994) to 0.02 during 2005-2007. Average age-adjusted mortality (deaths per million population) from hepatitis A also declined significantly, from 0.38 in the prevaccine period (1990-1995) to 0.26 during 2000-2004.


To access the full article, go to: http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/mm6019a5.htm
 
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2 FDA approves adenovirus type 4 and type 7 vaccine for use in military personnel ages 17 through 50 years

On March 16, FDA approved Adenovirus Type 4 and Type 7 Vaccine, Live, Oral, indicated for active immunization for the prevention of febrile acute respiratory disease (ARD) caused by Adenovirus Type 4 and Type 7. Approved for use in military populations ages 17 through 50 years, the vaccine is manufactured by Barr Labs, Inc., and distributed by Teva Pharmaceuticals USA, Inc., Sellersville, PA.

To access the adenovirus vaccine approval letter from the FDA website, go to:
http://www.fda.gov/BiologicsBloodVaccines/Vaccines/approvedProducts/ucm247511.htm

To access the adenovirus vaccine package insert from the FDA website, go to:
http://www.fda.gov/downloads/BiologicsBloodVaccines/Vaccines/ApprovedProducts/UCM247515.pdf

For more information about adenovirus vaccine from MILVAX, the Military Vaccine Agency, go to: http://www.vaccines.mil/adenovirus

MILVAX provides immunization educational support and training resources for Department of Defense healthcare providers and clinicians. Visit the MILVAX home page at http://www.vaccines.mil
 
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3 Washington state law requires parents to get information on the benefits and risks of immunization

On May 11, the Washington State Department of Health issued a press release titled "Immunization law requires parents to get info on benefits and risks of vaccine." Portions of the press release are reprinted below.


Washington has one of the highest school immunization exemption rates in the nation. On Tuesday Governor Gregoire signed a bill requiring a parent or guardian to show that they have received information from a healthcare provider on the benefits and risks of immunization before opting out of school vaccination requirements.

"Childhood immunizations save lives and are one of the most effective ways to protect kids from serious, preventable illnesses," says Secretary of Health Mary Selecky. "There's a lot of confusing information about vaccine circulating around, this law makes sure that parents will get reliable facts from one of their most trusted sources--a healthcare provider."

Previous state policy made it easy for parents to exempt their child from school immunization requirements based only on convenience. Washington's exemption rates have more than doubled over the last 10 years--during the 2009-2010 school year, 6.2 percent of children had a signed exemption. The national average for exemption rates is estimated at less than 2 percent.

Unvaccinated kids are more likely to catch and spread serious illnesses like whooping cough and measles, which can be prevented by vaccines. Making sure kids have all recommended immunizations protects them, their classmates, friends, and families from preventable diseases. Kids who aren't fully immunized may be excluded from attending school, preschool, or child care if a disease outbreak occurs. . . .


To access the entire press release, go to: http://www.doh.wa.gov/Publicat/2011_news/11-071.htm
 
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4 IAC updates its patient-education handout "Reliable Sources of Immunization Information"

IAC recently revised the patient-education handout "Reliable Sources of Immunization Information: Where to go to find answers!" Go to: http://www.immunize.org/catg.d/p4012.pdf
 
IAC's Handouts for Patients and Staff web section offers healthcare professionals and the public approximately 250 FREE English-language handouts (many also available in translation), which we encourage website users to print out, copy, and distribute widely. To access all of IAC's free handouts, go to: http://www.immunize.org/handouts
 
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5 IAC updates the provider-education handout "Need Help Responding to Vaccine-Hesitant Parents?"

IAC recently revised "Need Help Responding to Vaccine-Hesitant Parents? Science-based materials are available from these respected organizations." Go to: http://www.immunize.org/catg.d/p2070.pdf
 
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6 IAC's Video of the Week features "Crying Baby Symphony," a light-hearted look at babies leading healthier lives because of vaccination

IAC encourages IAC Express readers to watch a 1-minute video created by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation. Titled "Crying Baby Symphony," the video begins with pictures and sounds of crying babies and ends with images of babies--healthy, happy, and active--after receiving life-saving vaccines.

The video will be available on the home page of IAC's website through May 29. To access it, go to: http://www.immunize.org and click on the image under the words Video of the Week.

Remember to bookmark IAC's home page to view a new video every Monday.

To access the archives of IAC's Videos of the Week, go to: http://www.immunize.org/votw
 
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7 CDC offers a user-friendly child-and-teen vaccination schedule for parents

In conjunction with the American Academy of Family Physicians and the American Academy of Pediatrics, CDC has developed a colorful and user-friendly immunization schedule for parents of children and teens ages 7 through 18 years. A second page offers a good summary of the diseases the vaccines protect against.

To access this new resource, go to:
http://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/who/teens/downloads/parent-version-schedule-7-18yrs.pdf
 
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8 Spotlight on immunize.org: IAC provides resources and vaccination information on hepatitis A and B

It's Hepatitis Awareness Month! IAC offers access to essential hepatitis A and B information, including links to CDC recommendations, patient and staff handouts, as well as many other resources to help you carry out your vaccination activities.

To access the Hepatitis A web section, visit http://www.immunize.org/hepatitis-a

To access the Hepatitis B web section, visit http://www.immunize.org/hepatitis-b

The Diseases and Vaccines web section is a central organizing hub of IAC's website. To access information and resources for 18 vaccine-preventable diseases in addition to hepatitis A and hepatitis B, visit http://www.immunize.org/vaccines
 
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9 ANA confers its April 2011 Immunity Award on Patricia Stinchfield, MS, RN, CPNP

On April 25, the American Nurses Association (ANA) issued a press release announcing that ANA's Immunity Award for April 2011 was presented to Patricia Stinchfield, MS, RN, CPNP. Director of Infectious Disease Services at Children's Hospitals and Clinics of Minnesota, Stinchfield is also the liaison member representative to ACIP from the National Association of Pediatric Nurse Practitioners.

Portions of the press release are reprinted below.


"ANA is proud to celebrate National Infant Immunization Week by honoring Patsy Stinchfield with this award," said ANA President Karen A. Daley, PhD, MPH, RN, FAAN. "It is fitting that we recognize Patsy this week, because she has done so much to preserve and protect the health of children through immunization."

In addition to her hospital role, Stinchfield is a pediatric nurse practitioner who practices at the Children's Clinic in St. Paul for children and adolescents with . . . HIV and [other] immune deficiencies. She has been recognized for increasing the employee influenza vaccination rate at her hospital . . . from 64 percent in 2006-07 to 80 percent in 2008-09. This increase earned Stinchfield and her hospital the National Influenza Vaccine Summit Award for Immunization Excellence in a Healthcare Personnel Campaign in 2009.

Stinchfield is a frequent speaker at workshops and conferences on immunization, and specializes in coaching healthcare professionals on how to communicate most effectively with patients about vaccine safety. She currently serves as a clinical adjunct faculty member at the University of Minnesota School of Nursing.


To read the entire press release, go to:
http://www.nursingworld.org/FunctionalMenuCategories/MediaResources/
PressReleases/April-2011-ANA-Immunity-Award.aspx
 
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10.  IAC's popular laminated versions of the 2011 U.S. immunization schedules are now available. Order a supply for your workplace today!

IAC's laminated versions of the 2011 U.S. child/teen and adult immunization schedules are covered with a tough, washable coating that lets them stand up to a year's worth of use in every area of your workplace where immunizations are given. Each has six pages (i.e., three double-sided pages) and is folded to measure 8.5" by 11".

Laminated schedules are printed in color for easy reading, come complete with essential tables and footnotes, and include contraindications and precautions--a feature that will help you make an on-the-spot determination about the safety of vaccinating patients of any age.

PRICING
1-4 copies: $7.50 each
5-19 copies: $5.50 each
20-99 copies: $4.50 each

To view images of the laminated schedules, or to order online or download an order form, go to: http://www.immunize.org/shop/laminated-schedules.asp

For quotes on customizing or placing orders in excess of 999 schedules, call (651) 647-9009 or email admininfo@immunize.org

To learn about other essential immunization resources available for purchase from IAC, go to: http://www.immunize.org/shop
 
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11.  CDC's 2009 Surveillance Summary on the health status of minority communities includes information on influenza and pneumococcal vaccination

On May 20, CDC published an MMWR Surveillance Summary titled "Surveillance of Health Status in Minority Communities--Racial and Ethnic Approaches to Community Health Across the U.S. (REACH U.S.) Risk Factor Survey, United States, 2009." Page 9 includes information on influenza and pneumococcal vaccination rates among adults ages >=65 years. In addition, information on influenza vaccination is given in Table 25 (page 38) and pneumococcal vaccination in Table 26 (page 39).

To access the entire surveillance summary, go to: http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/pdf/ss/ss6006.pdf
 
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12.  VISs for hepatitis B and Td/Tdap vaccines now available in Indonesian

The VISs for hepatitis B and Td/Tdap vaccines are now available in Indonesian. IAC gratefully acknowledges Wentworth-Douglass Hospital, Dover, NH, for the translations.

To access all available Indonesian VIS translations, go to: http://www.immunize.org/vis/vis_indonesian.asp

For information about the use of VISs, and for VISs in more than 35 languages, visit IAC's VIS web section at http://www.immunize.org/vis
 
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Immunization Action Coalition  •  1573 Selby Ave  •  St. Paul, MN 55104
tel 651-647-9009  •  fax 651-647-9131
 
This website is supported in part by a cooperative agreement from the National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases (Grant No. 5U38IP000290) at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in Atlanta, GA. The website content is the sole responsibility of IAC and does not necessarily represent the official views of CDC.