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Immunization Action Coalition

IAC Express 2011

Issue number 910: January 24, 2011

Please click here to subscribe to IAC Express as well as other FREE IAC periodicals.
Contents of this Issue
Select a title to jump to the article.
  1. Reminder: New issues of Needle Tips and Vaccinate Adults available online
  2. British Medical Journal wraps up a special series that exposes Andrew Wakefield's fraudulent research
  3. Salon retracts Robert F. Kennedy Jr.'s report linking thimerosal to childhood neurological disorders
  4. FDA and CDC issue update on Fluzone influenza vaccine and VAERS reports of febrile seizures in children
  5. MMWR publishes CDC's recommendations for antiviral treatment and chemoprophylaxis of influenza infections
  6. Spotlight on immunize.org: IAC's most popular handouts for patients offered in 12 languages
  7. IAC's Video of the Week teaches children how to protect themselves from influenza
  8. Rotavirus vaccine VIS now available in Spanish
  9. Studies in Pediatric Infectious Diseases Journal's special supplement show rotavirus vaccines significantly reduce severe and fatal diarrhea in young children
  10. National Influenza Vaccine Summit is accepting nominations for its 2011 Immunization Excellence Awards through March 1
  11. IAC updates its "Notification of Vaccination Letter"
  12. Influenza vaccination is recommended for almost everyone, so please keep vaccinating!
  13. MMWR publishes report on self-reported cases of influenza-like illness in the U.S. during the 2009 H1N1 pandemic
  14. Award-winning DVD! "Immunization Techniques: Best Practices with Infants, Children, and Adults"--from the California Department of Public Health, Immunization Branch
  15. February 25 is the nomination deadline for the 2011 Natalie J. Smith, MD, Award
  16. VICNetwork hosts January 27 webinar on using storytelling to communicate the importance of vaccination
 
Abbreviations
AAFP, American Academy of Family Physicians; AAP, American Academy of Pediatrics; ACIP, Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices; AMA, American Medical Association; CDC, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention; FDA, Food and Drug Administration; IAC, Immunization Action Coalition; MMWR, Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report; NCIRD, National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases; NIVS, National Influenza Vaccine Summit; VIS, Vaccine Information Statement; VPD, vaccine-preventable disease; WHO, World Health Organization.
  
Issue 910: January 24, 2011
1.  Reminder: New issues of Needle Tips and Vaccinate Adults available online

The January issues of Needle Tips and Vaccinate Adults are available online for viewing, downloading, and printing. Both issues feature information on CDC's recommendations for expanded use of Tdap vaccine. Most of the content of Vaccinate Adults is identical to that of Needle Tips; only the pediatric information has been removed.

To download the entire issue of Needle Tips right now, go to: http://www.immunize.org/nslt.d/n47/n47.pdf

To download the entire issue of Vaccinate Adults right now, go to: http://www.immunize.org/va/va30.pdf

For complete information about the new issue of Needle Tips--including the table of contents and the magazine-viewer option--and for access to back issues, go to: http://www.immunize.org/nt

For complete information about the new issue of Vaccinate Adults--including the table of contents and the magazine-viewer option--and for access to back issues, go to: http://www.immunize.org/va

 
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2 British Medical Journal wraps up a special series that exposes Andrew Wakefield's fraudulent research

The British Medical Journal (BMJ) has finished publishing all of its three-part series about Dr. Andrew Wakefield's 1998 paper that fraudulently linked MMR vaccine to the development of autism. The series writer is investigative journalist Brian Deer.

Published on January 18, part three is titled "The Lancet's Two Days to Bury Bad News." It discloses what happened when Deer reported misconduct in Andrew Wakefield's MMR research to The Lancet, the medical journal that published the research. To access it, go to: http://www.bmj.com/content/342/bmj.c7001.full

Published on January 11, part two is titled "How the Vaccine Crisis Was Meant to Make Money." It reveals a secret scheme to raise huge sums from a campaign that claimed links existed between MMR, autism, and bowel disease. To access it, go to: http://www.bmj.com/content/342/bmj.c5258.full

Published on January 5, part one is titled "How the Case against the MMR Vaccine Was Fixed." It exposes the bogus data behind claims that launched a worldwide scare over the measles, mumps, and rubella vaccine. To access it, go to: http://www.bmj.com/content/342/bmj.c5347.full

IAC recently created a new web page titled "The Fraud Behind the MMR Scare." Frequently updated, it offers website users links to all three parts of the BMJ series, accompanying BMJ editorials, related print news coverage and commentary, and videos of broadcast media coverage. To access it, go to: http://www.immunize.org/bmj-deer-mmr-wakefield
 
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3 Salon retracts Robert F. Kennedy Jr.'s report linking thimerosal to childhood neurological disorders

Salon, a respected online news and entertainment website, recently retracted "Deadly Immunity," a 2005 report by Robert F. Kennedy Jr. In the report, Kennedy wrote that the mercury-based thimerosal compound present in vaccines until 2001 was dangerous, and that he was "convinced that the link between thimerosal and the epidemic of childhood neurological disorders is real."

Since publishing Kennedy's report, Salon issued five corrections that went far in undermining the report. However, recent criticism of Kennedy's premise eroded Salon's faith in the report's value, and Salon decided to remove the report from its website and issue a retraction.

To read Salon's retraction statement, go to: http://www.salon.com/about/inside_salon/2011/01/16/dangerous_immunity/index.html
 
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4 FDA and CDC issue update on Fluzone influenza vaccine and VAERS reports of febrile seizures in children

On January 20, FDA and CDC jointly issued an update regarding an increase in the number of reports to the Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System (VAERS) of febrile seizures following vaccination with Fluzone (inactivated, injectable influenza vaccine; sanofi pasteur). Portions of the update are reprinted below.


The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) routinely monitor the safety of all U.S. vaccines by using several vaccine safety surveillance systems, including the Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System (VAERS). VAERS collects and analyzes information from reported adverse events (health problems or possible side effects) that occur after vaccination.

FDA and CDC have recently detected an increase in the number of reports to VAERS of febrile seizures following vaccination with Fluzone (trivalent inactivated influenza vaccine or TIV, manufactured by Sanofi Pasteur, Inc.). Fluzone is the only influenza vaccine recommended for use for the 2010-2011 flu season in infants and children 6-23 months of age. These reported febrile seizures have primarily been seen in children younger than 2 years of age. Data from VAERS are preliminary and serve as a sign or indication that further investigation is warranted. Further investigations are under way to assess whether there could be an association between influenza vaccination and febrile seizures, or if other factors could be involved. FDA and CDC have seen no increase in VAERS reports of febrile seizures in people older than 2 years of age following vaccination with TIV, and no increase after live attenuated influenza vaccine (FluMist, the nasal spray vaccine). In the cases reported, all children recovered and no lasting effects have been seen. Recommendations for the use of flu vaccine in children have not changed.

FDA and CDC will continue to conduct studies and provide additional information to the public and healthcare providers as it becomes available. . . .

The risk of severe influenza illness is higher among young children, especially children under 2 years of age. Approximately 9 out of 10,000 children 6-23 months of age require hospitalization each season for reasons related to influenza. Flu vaccine is the best way to protect against becoming ill with the flu.

Recommendations for the use of flu vaccine in children have not changed. CDC recommends that all persons ages 6 months and older receive a flu vaccine each year.

FDA and CDC are conducting further analyses to investigate this preliminary finding in VAERS and will provide additional information as it becomes available. FDA is also working closely with the manufacturer to obtain additional information and investigate the situation further.


To access the complete FDA/CDC update, go to: http://www.fda.gov/BiologicsBloodVaccines/SafetyAvailability/VaccineSafety/ucm240037.htm
 
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5 MMWR publishes CDC's recommendations for antiviral treatment and chemoprophylaxis of influenza infections

On January 21, CDC published "Antiviral Agents for the Treatment and Chemoprophylaxis of Influenza: Recommendations of the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP)" as an MMWR Recommendations and Reports. The beginning of the summary section is reprinted below.


This report updates previous recommendations by CDC's Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) regarding the use of antiviral agents for the prevention and treatment of influenza (CDC. Prevention and control of influenza: recommendations of the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices [ACIP]. MMWR 2008;57[No. RR-7]). This report contains information on treatment and chemoprophylaxis of influenza virus infection and provides a summary of the effectiveness and safety of antiviral treatment medications. . . .


To access the complete recommendations in ready-to-print (PDF) format, go to: http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/pdf/rr/rr6001.pdf

To access the complete recommendations in web-text (HTML) format, go to: http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/rr6001a1.htm
 
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6 Spotlight on immunize.org: IAC's most popular handouts for patients offered in 12 languages

Looking for quick access to translated immunization materials for patients in Spanish, Arabic, Chinese, Farsi, French, Hmong, Japanese, Korean, Russian, Tagalog, Turkish, or Vietnamese? Look no further. If you are a healthcare professional who provides vaccination services to people who don't speak English, then you are likely aware that IAC is the "go-to" spot for translations of Vaccine Information Statements (VISs). Did you also know that many of IAC's most popular pieces are also available in several languages? All are in ready-to-print (PDF) format.

To access IAC's popular handouts for patients in 12 languages, visit: http://www.immunize.org/handouts/?f=6

If you have a need for an IAC handout or VIS in a language that is not currently available, please consider translating the piece for IAC and then sharing it with the world via immunize.org. You'll find details about providing translations for IAC at this link: http://www.immunize.org/translate.asp

IAC's Handouts for Patients and Staff web section offers healthcare professionals and the public more than 250 FREE English-language handouts (many also available in translation), which we encourage website users to print out, copy, and distribute widely. To access all of IAC's free handouts, go to: http://www.immunize.org/handouts/view-all.asp
 
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7 IAC's Video of the Week teaches children how to protect themselves from influenza

IAC encourages IAC Express readers to watch "The Flu Fighters," a 2-minute animated video that teaches elementary school students how to protect themselves from influenza. Made available by the Texas Department of State Health Services, the video features action-packed artwork, clever lyrics, and a bouncing rap beat.

The video will be available on the home page of IAC's website through January 30. To access it, go to: http://www.immunize.org and click on the image under the words Video of the Week. After January 30, access the video on YouTube at http://www.youtube.com/TexasDSHS#p/u/7/XzEIoj6lBes

Remember to bookmark IAC's home page to view a new video every Monday. To view an IAC Video of the Week from the past, go to the video archive at http://www.immunize.org/votw
 
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8 Rotavirus vaccine VIS now available in Spanish

The VIS for rotavirus vaccine is now available in Spanish. IAC gratefully acknowledges the Oregon Immunization Program for the translation.

To access the Spanish translation of the VIS for rotavirus vaccine, as well as its English-language counterpart, go to: http://www.immunize.org/vis/vis_rotavirus.asp

For information about the use of VISs, and for VISs in more than 35 languages, visit IAC's VIS web section at http://www.immunize.org/vis
 
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9 Studies in Pediatric Infectious Diseases Journal's special supplement show rotavirus vaccines significantly reduce severe and fatal diarrhea in young children

"Real World Impact of Rotavirus Vaccination," a special supplement to the January 2011 edition of the Pediatric Infectious Disease Journal, demonstrates the dramatic impact of rotavirus vaccines on children's health in both developed and developing countries. Studies in the supplement show that in the two-to-three years following the rollout of rotavirus vaccines in national immunization programs, countries experienced striking and swift reductions in the number of children younger than age five hospitalized as a result of acute diarrhea caused by rotavirus.

The entire content of the special supplement is available at no charge at http://journals.lww.com/pidj/toc/2011/01001
 
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10.  National Influenza Vaccine Summit is accepting nominations for its 2011 Immunization Excellence Awards through March 1

The nomination form for the National Influenza Vaccine Summit's Immunization Excellence Awards is now available. The awards recognize individuals and organizations that have made extraordinary contributions toward improved adult and/or childhood influenza vaccination within their communities. Awards will be presented during the National Influenza Vaccine Summit meeting to be held in May. The deadline for nominations is March 1.

There are four categories of recognition:
  • Overall Season Activities
  • Healthcare Personnel Campaign
  • Immunization Coalitions/Public Health/Community Campaign
  • Corporate Campaign

To access complete information and the online nomination form, go to: http://fs16.formsite.com/APhA/2011NIVSAwards

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11.  IAC updates its "Notification of Vaccination Letter"

The Immunization Action Coalition (IAC) recently revised its template "Notification of Vaccination Letter." The template letter lists the vaccines routinely administered to children and adults. It offers sample text that you can use to create a letter to notify medical practices that you have vaccinated their patient.

To access a ready-to-print (PDF) version of the revised prototype letter, go to: http://www.immunize.org/catg.d/p3060.pdf

IAC's Handouts for Patients and Staff web section offers healthcare professionals and the public approximately 250 FREE English-language handouts (many also available in translation), which we encourage website users to print out, copy, and distribute widely. To access all of IAC's free handouts, go to: http://www.immunize.org/handouts
 
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12.  Influenza vaccination is recommended for almost everyone, so please keep vaccinating!

Influenza vaccination is recommended for everyone age 6 months and older, so please keep vaccinating your patients.

If you don't have influenza vaccine, you can direct patients to the Google Flu Vaccine Finder. It helps the public find nearby locations where influenza vaccine is available. It's as simple as entering a zip code. Visit the Google Flu Vaccine Finder: http://www.google.com/flushot

Following is a list of resources related to influenza disease and vaccination for healthcare professionals and the public.

To access IAC's handouts related to influenza, including screening questionnaires, patient education pieces, and sample standing orders, go to: http://www.immunize.org/handouts/influenza-vaccines.asp

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13.  MMWR publishes report on self-reported cases of influenza-like illness in the U.S. during the 2009 H1N1 pandemic

CDC published "Self-Reported Influenza-Like Illness During the 2009 H1N1 Influenza Pandemic--United States, September 2009-March 2010" in the January 21 issue of MMWR. The beginning of first paragraph is reprinted below.


CDC identified the first case of 2009 H1N1 pandemic influenza on April 15, 2009. During the first 3 months of the outbreak, approximately 43,000 cases were reported to CDC. In June 2009, the World Health Organization declared the outbreak an influenza pandemic. Because no existing influenza surveillance system in the United States monitored influenza-like illness (ILI) among persons with ILI who did not seek health care, CDC initiated community-based surveillance of self-reported ILI (defined as the presence of fever with cough or sore throat) and healthcare-seeking behavior through a supplementary module of the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS). This report summarizes results from BRFSS surveys conducted during September 2009-March 2010. . . .


To access the full article in web-text (HTML) format, go to: http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/mm6002a1.htm
 
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14.  Award-winning DVD! "Immunization Techniques: Best Practices with Infants, Children, and Adults"--from the California Department of Public Health, Immunization Branch

The California Department of Public Health (CDPH), Immunization Branch, has updated its award-winning training video, "Immunization Techniques: Best Practices with Infants, Children, and Adults." The 25-minute program can be used to train new employees and to refresh the skills of experienced staff. The video demonstrates the skills and techniques needed to administer vaccines to patients of all ages. It includes instruction on the following:
  • Selecting, preparing, and administering injectable, oral, and nasal vaccines
  • Documenting immunizations
  • Making patients comfortable and educating them
  • Facilitating staff and patient communication

Prices start at $17 each for 1-9 copies and are greatly reduced for large orders, dropping to $4.25 each for 1,000-1,500 copies.

To learn more about the DVD, and find out how to order it, go to: http://www.immunize.org/shop/toolkit_iztechdvd.asp

For quotes on larger quantities, call (651) 647-9009 or email admininfo@immunize.org

The Immunization Action Coalition is the only nationwide vendor of this new DVD.

Note for healthcare settings located in California: Contact your local health department immunization program for a free copy.

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15.  February 25 is the nomination deadline for the 2011 Natalie J. Smith, MD, Award

The Association of Immunization Managers (AIM) is soliciting nominations for the 2011 Natalie J. Smith, MD, Award for excellence in program management. Nominations are due on February 25. The award is given annually at the National Immunization Conference to an outstanding program manager of one of the 64 federal immunization grantee immunization programs.

For background information, selection criteria, and access to the nomination form, go to: http://www.immunizationmanagers.org/membership/natalie_smith_award.phtml
 
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16.  VICNetwork hosts January 27 webinar on using storytelling to communicate the importance of vaccination

The Virtual Immunization Communication Network (VICNetwork) is hosting a free webinar on January 27 at 11 a.m. Pacific time/2 p.m. Eastern time. "Storytelling: A Tool for Effective Communication" features Bill Smith, EdD, co-founder of the Social Marketing Institute, Washington, DC; and Amanda Roth, MSW, MPH, California Department of Public Health.

Mr. Smith will discuss how to use storytelling to communicate information about immunization. Ms. Roth is involved in Shot by Shot, a project of the California Immunization Coalition. Shot by Shot has created a collection of stories from people who have been touched by vaccine-preventable diseases.

There is no fee to participate in the webinar, but pre-registration is required.

For additional information and to pre-register, go to: http://vicnetwork.org/2010/12/26/next-vicnetwork-webinar-january-2011 Scroll down to the link that's titled "Register here to attend our upcoming webinar."

For more information, go to http://vicnetwork.org

VICNetwork is a project of the National Public Health Information Coalition (NPHIC) in collaboration with the California Immunization Coalition (CIC).
 
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tel 651-647-9009  •  fax 651-647-9131
 
This website is supported in part by a cooperative agreement from the National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases (Grant No. 5U38IP000290) at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in Atlanta, GA. The website content is the sole responsibility of IAC and does not necessarily represent the official views of CDC.