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Immunization Action Coalition
IAC Express 2010
Issue number 856: March 15, 2010
Please click here to subscribe to IAC Express as well as other FREE IAC periodicals.
Contents of this Issue
Select a title to jump to the article.
  1. MMWR discusses licensure of 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine and presents CDC's recommendations for its use among children
  2. MMWR discusses licensure of a meningococcal conjugate vaccine (Menveo) and presents CDC's guidance for its use
  3. MMWR publishes CDC's recommendations for use of Japanese encephalitis vaccines
  4. IAC corrects information about ACIP's provisional recommendations for universal influenza vaccination, which appeared in the March 8 issue of IAC Express
  5. CDC Health Advisory notifies providers about potential cases of mumps during the current multi-state outbreak
  6. Vaccine Court rules that thimerosal-containing vaccines do not cause autism
  7. MMWR publishes report on invasive pneumococcal disease in young children before licensure of 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine
  8. Important: Register for CDC's April 1 Net Conference on the new ACIP recommendations for PCV13 and meningococcal vaccine
  9. IAC updates seven translations of the adolescent immunization piece "Are you 11-19 years old?"
  10. IAC's Video of the Week promotes a fund-raising campaign to prevent pneumonia in children worldwide
  11. Updated anthrax vaccine VIS incorporates recommendations for the new 5-dose administration schedule
  12. Keep vaccinating against H1N1 influenza!
  13. Important: While you're vaccinating against influenza, be sure to administer PPSV to all people with existing indications
  14. February issue of CDC's Immunization Works electronic newsletter is now online
  15. Shingles vaccine VIS now available in Thai
  16. CDC website posts presentation slide sets and the live meeting archive from the February ACIP meeting
  17. PKIDS' March 23 webinar to present an overview of social marketing; March 24 webinar to focus on identity management
  18. MMWR publishes report on progress made in 2009 toward poliomyelitis eradication in Afghanistan and Pakistan
  19. Epidemiology in Action course set for April 26-May 7 at Emory University in Atlanta
  20. International Papillomavirus Conference set for July 3-8 in Montreal; early registration deadline is March 30
 
Abbreviations
AAFP, American Academy of Family Physicians; AAP, American Academy of Pediatrics; ACIP, Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices; AMA, American Medical Association; CDC, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention; FDA, Food and Drug Administration; IAC, Immunization Action Coalition; MMWR, Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report; NCIRD, National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases; NIVS, National Influenza Vaccine Summit; VIS, Vaccine Information Statement; VPD, vaccine-preventable disease; WHO, World Health Organization.
  
Issue 856: March 15, 2010
1.  MMWR discusses licensure of 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine and presents CDC's recommendations for its use among children

CDC published "Licensure of a 13-Valent Pneumococcal Conjugate Vaccine (PCV13) and Recommendations for Use Among Children--Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP), 2010" in the March 12 issue of MMWR. The first paragraph and the section on Indications and Guidance for Use are reprinted below.

IAC Express Editor's Note: The section on Indications and Guidance for Use has three useful tables. Readers are encouraged to access them using the link that appears at the end of this IAC Express article.


On February 24, 2010, a 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV13 [Prevnar 13, Wyeth Pharmaceuticals Inc., a subsidiary of Pfizer Inc.]) was licensed by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for prevention of invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) caused by the 13 pneumococcal serotypes covered by the vaccine and for prevention of otitis media caused by serotypes in the 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine formulation (PCV7 [Prevnar, Wyeth]). PCV13 is approved for use among children aged 6 weeks-71 months and succeeds PCV7, which was licensed by FDA in 2000. The Pneumococcal Vaccines Work Group of the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) reviewed available data on the immunogenicity, safety, and cost-effectiveness of PCV13, and on estimates of the vaccine-preventable pneumococcal disease burden. The working group then presented policy options for consideration of the full ACIP. This report summarizes recommendations approved by ACIP on February 24, 2010, for (1) routine vaccination of all children aged 2-59 months with PCV13, (2) vaccination with PCV13 of children aged 60-71 months with underlying medical conditions that increase their risk for pneumococcal disease or complications, and (3) PCV13 vaccination of children who previously received 1 or more doses of PCV7. CDC guidance for vaccination providers regarding transition from PCV7 to the PCV13 immunization program also is included. . . .

INDICATIONS AND GUIDANCE FOR USE
ACIP recommends PCV13 for all children aged 2-59 months. ACIP also recommends PCV13 for children aged 60-71 months with underlying medical conditions that increase their risk for pneumococcal disease or complications.

NO PREVIOUS PCV7/PCV13 VACCINATION. The ACIP recommendation for routine vaccination with PCV13 and the immunization schedules for infants and toddlers through age 59 months who have not received any previous PCV7 or PCV13 doses are the same as those previously published for PCV7. PCV13 is recommended as a 4-dose series at ages 2, 4, 6, and 12-15 months. Infants receiving their first dose at age <=6 months should receive 3 doses of PCV13 at intervals of approximately 8 weeks (the minimum interval is 4 weeks). The fourth dose is recommended at age 12-15 months, and at least 8 weeks after the third dose.

Children aged 7-59 months who have not been vaccinated with PCV7 or PCV13 previously should receive 1 to 3 doses of PCV13, depending on their age at the time when vaccination begins and whether underlying medical conditions are present. Children aged 24-71 months with chronic medical conditions that increase their risk for pneumococcal disease should receive 2 doses of PCV13. Interruption of the vaccination schedule does not require reinstitution of the entire series or the addition of extra doses.

INCOMPLETE PCV7/PCV13 VACCINATION. Infants and children who have received 1 or more doses of PCV7 should complete the immunization series with PCV13. Children aged 12-23 months who have received 3 doses of PCV7 before age 12 months are recommended to receive 1 dose of PCV13, given at least 8 weeks after the last dose of PCV7. No additional PCV13 doses are recommended for children aged 12-23 months who received 2 or 3 doses of PCV7 before age 12 months and at least 1 dose of PCV13 at age >=12 months.

Similar to the previous ACIP recommendation for use of PCV7, 1 dose of PCV13 is recommended for all healthy children aged 24-59 months with any incomplete PCV schedule (PCV7 or PCV13). For children aged 24-71 months with underlying medical conditions who have received any incomplete schedule of <3 doses of PCV (PCV7 or PCV13) before age 24 months, 2 doses of PCV13 are recommended. For children with underlying medical conditions who have received 3 doses of PCV (PCV7 or PCV13), a single dose of PCV13 is recommended through age 71 months. The minimum interval between doses is 8 weeks.

COMPLETE PCV7 VACCINATION. A single supplemental dose of PCV13 is recommended for all children aged 14-59 months who have received 4 doses of PCV7 or another age-appropriate, complete PCV7 schedule. For children who have underlying medical conditions, a single supplemental PCV13 dose is recommended through age 71 months. This includes children who have previously received the 23-valent pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine (PPSV23). PCV13 should be given at least 8 weeks after the last dose of PCV7 or PPSV23.

In addition, a single dose of PCV13 may be administered to children aged 6-18 years who are at increased risk for IPD because of sickle cell disease, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection or other immunocompromising condition, cochlear implant, or cerebrospinal fluid leaks, regardless of whether they have previously received PCV7 or PPSV23. Routine use of PCV13 is not recommended for healthy children aged >=5 years. . . .


To access the MMWR article in PDF format, go to:
http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/PDF/wk/mm5909.pdf and see pages 258-261.

For the full article in web-text (HTML) format, go to:
http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/mm5909a2.htm

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2 MMWR discusses licensure of a meningococcal conjugate vaccine (Menveo) and presents CDC's guidance for its use

CDC published "Licensure of a Meningococcal Conjugate Vaccine (Menveo) and Guidance for Use--Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP), 2010" in the March 12 issue of MMWR. The first paragraph and the section on Guidance for Use of MenACWY-CRM (Menveo) are reprinted below.


On February 19, 2010, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) licensed a quadrivalent meningococcal conjugate vaccine, MenACWY-CRM (Menveo, Novartis Vaccines and Diagnostics). MenACWY-CRM is licensed as a single dose for use among persons aged 11-55 years. The Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) reviewed data from prelicensure clinical trials on the safety and immunogenicity of MenACWY-CRM. This report summarizes the approved indications for MenACWY-CRM and provides guidance from ACIP for its use. The following guidance for use of MenACWY-CRM is consistent with licensed indications and ACIP recommendations for meningococcal conjugate vaccines. . . .

GUIDANCE FOR USE OF MenACWY-CRM
MenACWY-CRM is licensed by the FDA as a single dose in persons aged 11-55 years. ACIP recommends quadrivalent meningococcal conjugate vaccine for all persons aged 11-18 years and for persons aged 2-55 years who are at increased risk for meningococcal disease. Persons at increased risk for meningococcal disease include (1) college freshmen living in dormitories, (2) microbiologists who are exposed routinely to isolates of Neisseria meningitidis, (3) military recruits, (4) persons who travel to or reside in countries where meningococcal disease is hyperendemic or epidemic, (5) persons who have persistent complement component deficiencies, and (6) persons with anatomic or functional asplenia. MenACWY-CRM or MCV4 may be used in persons aged 11-55 years, and are preferred to quadrivalent meningococcal polysaccharide vaccine (MPSV4). Persons aged 2-10 years who are recommended to receive a meningococcal vaccine should receive MCV4, and persons aged >55 years should receive MPSV4.


To access the MMWR article in PDF format, go to:
http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/PDF/wk/mm5909.pdf and see page 273.

For the article in web-text (HTML) format, go to:
http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/mm5909a5.htm

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3 MMWR publishes CDC's recommendations for use of Japanese encephalitis vaccines

On March 12, CDC published "Japanese Encephalitis Vaccines: Recommendations of the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP)" in MMWR Recommendations and Reports. The Summary section is reprinted below.


This report updates the 1993 recommendations by CDC's Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) regarding the prevention of Japanese encephalitis (JE) among travelers (CDC. Inactivated Japanese encephalitis virus vaccine: recommendations of the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices [ACIP]. MMWR 1993;42[No. RR-1]). This report summarizes the epidemiology of JE, describes the two JE vaccines that are licensed in the United States, and provides recommendations for their use among travelers and laboratory workers.

JE virus (JEV), a mosquito-borne flavivirus, is the most common vaccine-preventable cause of encephalitis in Asia. JE occurs throughout most of Asia and parts of the western Pacific. Among an estimated 35,000-50,000 annual cases, 20%-30% of patients die, and 30%-50% of survivors have neurologic or psychiatric sequelae. No treatment exists. For most travelers to Asia, the risk for JE is very low but varies on the basis of destination, duration, season, and activities.

JE vaccine is recommended for travelers who plan to spend a month or longer in endemic areas during the JEV transmission season and for laboratory workers with a potential for exposure to infectious JEV. JE vaccine should be considered for (1) short-term (<1 month) travelers to endemic areas during the JEV transmission season if they plan to travel outside of an urban area and will have an increased risk for JEV exposure; (2) travelers to an area with an ongoing JE outbreak; and (3) travelers to endemic areas who are uncertain of specific destinations, activities, or duration of travel. JE vaccine is not recommended for short-term travelers whose visit will be restricted to urban areas or times outside of a well-defined JEV transmission season.

Two JE vaccines are licensed in the United States. An inactivated mouse brain-derived JE vaccine (JE-VAX [JE-MB]) has been licensed since 1992 to prevent JE in persons aged >=1 year traveling to JE-endemic countries. Supplies of this vaccine are limited because production has ceased. In March 2009, an inactivated Vero cell culture-derived vaccine (IXIARO [JE-VC]) was licensed for use in persons aged >=17 years. JE-MB is the only JE vaccine available for use in children aged 1-16 years, and remaining supplies will be reserved for use in this group.


To access the complete recommendations in PDF format, go to:
http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/pdf/rr/rr5901.pdf

For the document in web-text (HTML) format, go to:
http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/rr5901a1.htm

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4 IAC corrects information about ACIP's provisional recommendations for universal influenza vaccination, which appeared in the March 8 issue of IAC Express

The lead article in the March 8 IAC Express incorrectly stated that CDC posted provisional recommendations for universal inactivated influenza vaccination in the 2010-11 U.S. influenza season. In fact, the provisional recommendation is for universal influenza vaccination and did not specify inactivated vaccine only. Thus, either inactivated or live-virus influenza vaccines may be used in accordance with their indications.

The core message in the provisional recommendations reads as follows:

"Vaccination recommendations for adults were expanded to include all adults beginning in the 2010-11 influenza season. Therefore, all people age 6 months and older are now recommended to receive annual influenza vaccination."

To access ACIP's provisional influenza vaccine recommendations for 2010-11, go to:
http://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/recs/provisional/downloads/flu-vac-mar-2010-508.pdf

IAC regrets the error and any confusion it may have caused the readers of IAC Express.

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5 CDC Health Advisory notifies providers about potential cases of mumps during the current multi-state outbreak

On March 11, CDC issued a Health Advisory titled "Notice to Providers Concerning Potential Cases of Mumps During a Multi-State Outbreak." Portions of the advisory are reprinted below.


CDC, in collaboration with public health officials in numerous states in the Northeast, continues to investigate a multi-state mumps outbreak.

Who is affected: The Hasidic (Jewish) populations from New York and New Jersey are primarily affected. This outbreak is also occurring among members of the same population in Israel.

Why mumps transmission is a concern at this time: The onset of Passover (March 30th through April 5th) may offer further opportunities for mumps transmission as people from the Hasidic community travel for this major religious observance.

Recommendations for Providers:
Healthcare providers with patients in any Hasidic community should ensure that these patients, including both children and adults, are up to date with measles-mumps-rubella (MMR) vaccine. The second dose of MMR vaccine for children may be administered as early as 28 days following the first dose.

Healthcare providers may consider offering a second dose of MMR vaccine to adults who have received one dose.

Healthcare providers who have contact within the Hasidic community should ensure that they themselves and ALL staff are immune to mumps in accordance with ACIP recommendations, click here, or receive two doses of MMR vaccine.
  • Persons with suspected mumps should be isolated for 5 days after onset of parotitis and, if they visit a healthcare setting, droplet precautions should be initiated immediately.
  • Any suspected mumps case should be reported to the health department in the area where the case-patient resides.

Resources for Providers

1. Vaccine Information Statement

* Yiddish:
http://www.nyc.gov/html/doh/downloads/pdf/imm/mumps_vis-yi.pdf

* English:
http://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/pubs/vis/default.htm#mmr

2. Resources (fact sheets on mumps and the outbreak) for Patients

http://www.cdc.gov/mumps/about/downloads/mumps-factsheet.pdf

http://www.cdc.gov/mumps/outbreaks/outbreak-patient-qa.html

3. Radio PSA (free for download)
http://www2c.cdc.gov/podcasts/player.asp?f=805169

To access the complete Health Advisory, go to:
http://www2a.cdc.gov/HAN/ArchiveSys/ViewMsgV.asp?AlertNum=00310

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6 Vaccine Court rules that thimerosal-containing vaccines do not cause autism

On March 12, three Special Masters of the U.S. Court of Federal Claims ruled that thimerosal-containing vaccines do not cause autism.

The rulings are part of the Omnibus Autism Proceeding created by the National Vaccine Injury Compensation Program to consolidate the large number of claims that vaccines induce autism. A link to the rulings is given at the end of this IAC Express article. Also on March 12, Every Child By Two (ECBT) issued a press release on the rulings. It is reprinted below.


The U.S. Court of Federal Claims today exonerated vaccines in the debate over the causes of autism. The three judges ruled that thimerosal-containing vaccines do not cause autism. The ruling supports a series of biological and epidemiological studies which have failed to show a link between vaccines and the widely-diagnosed neurodevelopmental disorder. Another ruling last year from the same court declared that the measles-mumps-rubella vaccine, or MMR, in combination with thimerosal-containing vaccines, does not cause autism.

"The Court has supported the science that shows that vaccines do not cause autism," said pediatrician Dr. Paul Offit, chief of Infectious Diseases and the director of the Vaccine Education Center at the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia. "Parents should take heart in this decision and continue to immunize their children with the confidence that they are the safest, most effective way to protect against dangerous diseases."

The decision is the result of an extensive deliberation by three Special Masters, judges responsible for claims filed in the National Vaccine Injury Compensation Program. In one opinion, Special Master George Hastings wrote, "This case, however, is not a close case. The overall weight of the evidence is overwhelmingly contrary to the petitioners' causation theories. . . . In short, this is a case in which the evidence is so one-sided that any nuances in the interpretation of the causation case law would make no difference to the outcome of the case."

"It's time to move forward and look for the real causes of autism," said Alison Singer, president of the Autism Science Foundation. "There is not a bottomless pit of money with which to fund autism science. We have to use our scarce resources wisely. Our children deserve real answers and at this point doing more and more studies of vaccines, when the science is so clear, would be allowing politics to triumph over science."

"This is a great day for children," said Amy Pisani, MS, executive director of Every Child By Two. "One life lost to a vaccine-preventable disease because of false rumors is one too many. With this decision, as well as the recent retraction of The Lancet study, we hope these rumors are finally put to rest so that families can once again feel confident in the safety of vaccines."

This is the second of two decisions issued in what the U.S. Court of Federal Claims has dubbed the Omnibus Autism Proceeding. The first decision, which was ruled upon last year by the Special Masters, determined that the measles-mumps-rubella vaccine, or MMR, in combination with thimerosal-containing vaccines do not cause autism. These judgments will decide over 5,000 claims pending in this court that autism is caused by vaccines.


To access the three rulings, go to:
http://www.uscfc.uscourts.gov/node/5026

To access the ECBT press release, click here.

For information on the Vaccine Program/Office of Special Masters, go to:
http://www.uscfc.uscourts.gov/vaccine-programoffice-special-masters

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7 MMWR publishes report on invasive pneumococcal disease in young children before licensure of 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine

CDC published "Invasive Pneumococcal Disease in Young Children Before Licensure of 13-Valent Pneumococcal Conjugate Vaccine--United States, 2007" in the March 12 issue of MMWR. The first paragraph is reprinted below.


Invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD), caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae (pneumococcus), remains a leading cause of serious illness in children and adults worldwide. After routine infant immunization with a 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV7) began in 2000, IPD among children aged <5 years in the United States decreased by 76%; however, IPD from non-PCV7 serotypes, particularly 19A, has increased. In February 2010, the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) issued recommendations for use of a newly licensed 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV13). PCV13 contains the seven serotypes in PCV7 (4, 6B, 9V, 14, 18C, 19F, and 23F) and six additional serotypes (1, 3, 5, 6A, 7F, and 19A). To characterize the potentially vaccine-preventable IPD burden among children aged <5 years in the United States, CDC and investigators analyzed 2007 data from Active Bacterial Core surveillance (ABCs). This report summarizes the results of that analysis, which found that among 427 IPD cases with known serotype in children aged <5 years, 274 (64%) were caused by serotypes contained in PCV13. In 2007, an estimated 4,600 cases of IPD occurred in children in this age group in the United States, including approximately 2,900 cases caused by serotypes covered in PCV13 (versus 70 cases caused by PCV7 serotypes). PCV13 use has the potential to further reduce IPD in the United States. Post-licensure monitoring will help characterize the effectiveness of PCV13 in different populations and track the potential changes in disease burden caused by non-PCV13 serotypes.


To access the MMWR article in PDF format, go to:
http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/PDF/wk/mm5909.pdf and see pages 253-257.

For the article in web-text (HTML) format, go to:
http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/mm5909a1.htm

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8 Important: Register for CDC's April 1 Net Conference on the new ACIP recommendations for PCV13 and meningococcal vaccine

The next NCIRD live Net Conference will cover the new ACIP recommendations for PCV 13 and the new meningococcal vaccine recommendations. The Net Conference is scheduled from noon to 1PM ET on April 1. Pekka Nuorti, MD, DSc, will speak on the PCV13 recommendations; Amanda Cohn, MD, on the meningococcal vaccine recommendations. Andrew Kroger, MD, MPH, will moderate.

Participation in the Q&A section of the program is available by phone and Internet. This is a limited-entry event. CDC urges early registration; registration will close on March 30 or when the course is full.

To register, go to:
http://www2.cdc.gov/vaccines/ed/ciinc

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9 IAC updates seven translations of the adolescent immunization piece "Are you 11-19 years old?"

In January, IAC updated the English version of "Are you 11-19 years old? Then you need to be vaccinated against these serious diseases!" with information about HPV vaccination in males. IAC recently updated the Spanish, Arabic, Chinese, French, Korean, Russian, and Vietnamese translations of the piece.

To access the Spanish version of the revised ready-to-print (PDF) print piece "Are you 11-19 years old?" go to:
http://www.immunize.org/catg.d/p4020-01.pdf

To access the Arabic version of the revised ready-to-print (PDF) print piece "Are you 11-19 years old?" go to:
http://www.immunize.org/catg.d/p4020-20.pdf

To access the Chinese version of the revised ready-to-print (PDF) print piece "Are you 11-19 years old?" go to:
http://www.immunize.org/catg.d/p4020-08.pdf

To access the French version of the revised ready-to-print (PDF) print piece "Are you 11-19 years old?" go to:
http://www.immunize.org/catg.d/p4020-10.pdf

To access the Korean version of the revised ready-to-print (PDF) print piece "Are you 11-19 years old?" go to:
http://www.immunize.org/catg.d/p4020-09.pdf

To access the Russian version of the revised ready-to-print (PDF) print piece "Are you 11-19 years old?" go to:
http://www.immunize.org/catg.d/p4020-07.pdf

To access the Vietnamese version of the revised ready-to-print (PDF) print piece "Are you 11-19 years old?" go to:
http://www.immunize.org/catg.d/p4020-05.pdf

To access the English version the revised ready-to-print (PDF) print piece "Are you 11-19 years old?" go to:
http://www.immunize.org/catg.d/p4020.pdf

IAC's Print Materials web section offers healthcare professionals and the public approximately 250 FREE English-language materials (many also available in translation), which we encourage website users to print out, copy, and distribute widely. To access all of IAC's free print materials, go to: http://www.immunize.org/printmaterials

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10.  IAC's Video of the Week promotes a fund-raising campaign to prevent pneumonia in children worldwide

IAC encourages IAC Express readers to watch "Pnock Out Pneumonia," a 1-minute video developed by the Best Shot Foundation to promote a dodge ball tournament that will raise funds to help global efforts to prevent pneumonia in children.

The video will be available on the home page of IAC's website through March 21. To access it, go to: http://www.immunize.org and click on the image under the words Video of the Week. It may take a few moments for the video to begin playing; please be patient!

Remember to bookmark IAC's home page to view a new video every Monday. To view an IAC Video of the Week from the past, go to the video archive at http://www.immunize.org/votw

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11.  Updated anthrax vaccine VIS incorporates recommendations for the new 5-dose administration schedule

On March 10, CDC issued a revised version of the VIS for anthrax vaccine. Available in English only, the revised version incorporates the new recommendation for the 5-dose routine schedule.

To access the 3/10/10 VIS for anthrax vaccine from the IAC website, go to: http://www.immunize.org/vis/anthrx03.pdf

For information about the use of VISs, and for VISs in more than 35 languages, visit IAC's VIS web section at http://www.immunize.org/vis

For general information about VISs from CDC's website go to: http://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/pubs/vis

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12.  Keep vaccinating against H1N1 influenza!

Please continue to vaccinate patients against H1N1 influenza. Providers who don't have H1N1 influenza vaccine can direct patients to the Google Flu Shot Finder at http://www.google.com/flushot

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13.  Important: While you're vaccinating against influenza, be sure to administer PPSV to all people with existing indications

CDC advises healthcare professionals that during seasonal and H1N1 influenza outbreaks, all people who have existing indications for pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine (PPSV) should be vaccinated according to current ACIP recommendations. This is important because people with existing indications are not only at increased risk for pneumococcal disease, but are also at increased risk for serious complications from influenza.

CDC has issued related guidance titled "Prevention of Pneumococcal Infections Secondary to Seasonal and 2009 H1N1 Influenza Viruses Infection." To access it, go to:
http://www.cdc.gov/h1n1flu/vaccination/provider/provider_pneumococcal.htm

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14.  February issue of CDC's Immunization Works electronic newsletter is now online

CDC recently released the February issue of its monthly newsletter Immunization Works; it is posted on the website of the National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases (NCIRD). The newsletter offers the immunization community information about current topics. The information is in the public domain and can be reproduced and circulated widely.

Some of the information in the February issue has already appeared in previous issues of IAC Express. Following is the text of some articles we have not covered.


2009 H1N1 AND SEASONAL INFLUENZA UPDATE: Stay Informed! Information on 2009 pandemic influenza A (H1N1) is updated frequently. Please visit the following websites for the latest updates:

2009 H1N1 Flu home page
http://www.cdc.gov/h1n1flu

CDC Free Flu Resources
http://www.cdc.gov/flu/freeresources

You Call the Shots Training Course: Updated Seasonal Influenza Module
http://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/ed/youcalltheshots.htm


CDC ESTIMATES OF 2009 H1N1 INFLUENZA CASES, HOSPITALIZATIONS AND DEATHS IN THE UNITED STATES: On February 12, 2010, CDC issued updated estimates of the number of 2009 H1N1 cases, hospitalizations, and deaths for the United States from April 2009 through January 16, 2010 (http://www.cdc.gov/h1n1flu/estimates_2009_h1n1.htm).
  • CDC estimates that between 41 million and 84 million cases of 2009 H1N1 occurred from April 2009 through January 16, 2010. The mid-level in this range is about 57 million people infected with 2009 H1N1.
     
  • CDC estimates that between 183,000 and 378,000 H1N1-related hospitalizations occurred from April 2009 through January 16, 2010. The mid-level in this range is about 257,000 2009 H1N1-related hospitalizations.
     
  • CDC estimates that between 8,330 and 17,160 2009 H1N1-related deaths occurred from April 2009 through January 16, 2010. The mid-level in this range is about 11,690 2009 H1N1-related deaths. . . .

To access the complete February issue of Immunization Works, go to:
http://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/news/newsltrs/imwrks/2010/201002.htm

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15.  Shingles vaccine VIS now available in Thai

Dated 10/6/09, the VIS for shingles vaccine is now available in Thai. IAC gratefully acknowledges Asian Pacific Health Care Venture, Inc., for the translation.

To access the Thai version of the 10/6/09 VIS for shingles vaccine, go to: http://www.immunize.org/vis/th_shingles.pdf

To access the English version of the 10/6/09 VIS for shingles vaccine, go to:
http://www.immunize.org/vis/shingles.pdf

For information about the use of VISs, and for VISs in more than 35 languages, visit IAC's VIS web section at http://www.immunize.org/vis

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16.  CDC website posts presentation slide sets and the live meeting archive from the February ACIP meeting

The CDC website recently posted the PowerPoint slide sets presented at the February 24-25 ACIP meeting, as well as the live meeting archive.

To access the slide sets, go to:
http://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/recs/acip/slides-feb10.htm 

To access the live meeting archive, go to:
http://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/recs/acip/livemeeting-feb10.htm

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17.  PKIDS' March 23 webinar to present an overview of social marketing; March 24 webinar to focus on identity management

PKIDS (Parents of Kids with Infectious Diseases) has scheduled a webinar for March 23. It will provide hands-on, how-to instruction on various aspects of creating a social marketing (NOT "social media") campaign. Note: This presentation is a slight variation of the webinar presented on March 4. A webinar scheduled for March 24 will focus on identity management. The webinars are part of Communications Made Easy, a PKIDS' program intended to help immunization educators learn the ropes of social marketing and traditional and social media.

SOCIAL MARKETING 101 is scheduled for March 23 at 12PM Pacific Time. Space is limited and pre-registration is recommended. To register, go to:
https://cc.readytalk.com/cc/schedule/display.do?udc=b6b1vfgvxk5f

IDENTITY MANAGEMENT is scheduled for March 24 at 9AM Pacific Time. Space is limited and pre-registration is recommended. To register, go to:
https://cc.readytalk.com/cc/schedule/display.do?udc=511kyea7plic

For more information on the Communications Made Easy program, go to: http://www.pkids.org/cme

PKIDS supports people whose children have been affected by viral hepatitis, HIV/AIDS, and other chronic, viral infectious diseases, and educates the public about effective disease prevention practices. To visit the PKIDS website, go to: http://www.pkids.org

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18.  MMWR publishes report on progress made in 2009 toward poliomyelitis eradication in Afghanistan and Pakistan

CDC published "Progress Toward Poliomyelitis Eradication--Afghanistan and Pakistan, 2009" in the March 12 issue of MMWR. The first few sentences of the article follow; a link to the full article is given at the end of this IAC Express article.


Afghanistan, Pakistan, India, and Nigeria are the four remaining countries where indigenous wild poliovirus (WPV) transmission has never been interrupted. This report updates previous reports and describes polio eradication activities in Afghanistan and Pakistan during January-December 2009 and proposed activities in 2010 to address challenges. . . .

To access the full article in web-text (HTML) format, go to:
http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/mm5909a4.htm

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19.  Epidemiology in Action course set for April 26-May 7 at Emory University in Atlanta

Intended for state and local public health professionals, Epidemiology in Action will be held April 26-May 7 on the campus of Emory University in Atlanta. The course is co-sponsored by CDC and Rollins School of Public Health at Emory University. The application deadline is March 26, or whenever the course is full.

Information is available electronically at http://www.sph.emory.edu/EPICOURSES/basic.htm or by telephone at (404) 727-3485 or by email at pvaleri@emory.edu

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20.  International Papillomavirus Conference set for July 3-8 in Montreal; early registration deadline is March 30

The International Papillomavirus Conference & Clinical and Public Health Workshops is scheduled for July 3-8 in Montreal. The deadline for early registration in March 30; the deadline for standard registration is May 1. The conference is looking forward to receiving late-breaking abstracts that will bring up-to-the-minute content to the conference. The deadline for submitting late-breaking abstracts is May 15.

For a wealth of information on various aspects of the conference and workshops, go to: http://hpv2010.org/main

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