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Immunization Action Coalition
IAC Express 2007
Issue number 690: October 29, 2007
 
Contents of this Issue
Select a title to jump to the article.
  1. Fatal case of human rabies reported in Minnesota
  2. How's your state doing? Data tables and maps of 2006 NIS childhood immunization rates make it easy to find out
  3. VISs for injectable influenza vaccine and Tdap vaccine now available in several additional languages
  4. Error corrected in December 2006 recommendations for eliminating hepatitis B transmission in adults
  5. CDC launches its redesigned Spanish-language website, "CDC en Espanol"
  6. October 25 issue of IAC's Hep Express electronic newsletter now online
  7. October issue of CDC's Immunization Works electronic newsletter available on CDC website
  8. CDC's Seasonal Flu web section posts updated materials
  9. WHO reports that projected production of pandemic influenza vaccine has increased significantly
  10. FDA, NIH, and WHO plan public workshop on pandemic influenza vaccine development for December 10-11
  11. Draft of pandemic influenza vaccine allocation plan now online; public comment will be sought
 
Abbreviations
AAFP, American Academy of Family Physicians; AAP, American Academy of Pediatrics; ACIP, Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices; AMA, American Medical Association; CDC, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention; FDA, Food and Drug Administration; IAC, Immunization Action Coalition; MMWR, Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report; NCIRD, National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases; NIVS, National Influenza Vaccine Summit; VIS, Vaccine Information Statement; VPD, vaccine-preventable disease; WHO, World Health Organization.
  
Issue 690: October 29, 2007
1.  Fatal case of human rabies reported in Minnesota

On October 23, the Minnesota Department of Health (MDH) issued a press release reporting the death of a Minnesota man from rabies on October 20. The death underscores the importance of healthcare professionals educating patients about (1) the danger bats pose as rabies carriers and (2) the efficacy of rabies postexposure prophylaxis (PEP), when initiated immediately after bat contact or suspected bat contact.

Portions of the MDH press release are reprinted below.


STATE REPORTS RARE DEATH FROM HUMAN RABIES
Only four other cases reported in Minnesota in the past century

Minnesota's second case of human rabies in seven years has prompted state health officials to remind Minnesota residents to seek immediate medical attention if they have had contact with a bat. A man in his 40s who was exposed to a bat in north-central Minnesota in mid-August died Saturday, October 20, the Minnesota Department of Health (MDH) reported today.

Officials at MDH believe the man was infected with the rabies virus after being bitten by a bat sometime in mid-August; although he reportedly felt a "needle-prick," he did not believe he was bitten because no blood was drawn. He did not seek medical care immediately following the incident.

The diagnosis of rabies was confirmed Thursday, October 18, based on testing done by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in Atlanta. . . . .

The number of rabies-related human deaths in the U.S. has declined from more than 100 annually in the early 1900s to one to three per year more recently. Modern day prophylaxis has proven nearly 100 percent effective at preventing the disease. However, treatment must be started before symptoms of rabies appear; once a person develops symptoms, the illness is almost always fatal. . . .

People who may have been exposed to the rabies virus are given an injection of rabies immune globulin, and five doses of rabies vaccine over a one-month period. Treatment is unnecessary if the suspect animal can be captured, tested, and found to be free of the virus. . . .


To access the complete press release, go to:
http://www.health.state.mn.us/news/pressrel/rabies102307.html

To access the document "Human Rabies Prevention--United States, 1999: Recommendations of the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP)," go to:
http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/PDF/rr/rr4801.PDF

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2 How's your state doing? Data tables and maps of 2006 NIS childhood immunization rates make it easy to find out

The CDC website recently posted 2006 National Immunization Survey (NIS) data tables and maps that show estimated immunization rates by state for various childhood vaccines and vaccine series. The data tables present data in two ways for each state and local area--in the aggregate and by race and ethnicity. Maps are color coded, with each state's color indicating the immunization rate the state has achieved for a given vaccine or vaccine series.

To access the data tables and maps, go to: http://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/stats-surv/nis/figures/2006_map.htm Click on the vaccine or vaccine series to be taken to the pertinent data table; click on the word "map" to be taken to the pertinent U.S. map.

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3 VISs for injectable influenza vaccine and Tdap vaccine now available in several additional languages

The current version (dated 7/16/07) of the VIS for trivalent inactivated influenza vaccine (TIV; injectable) is now available on the IAC website in Hmong, Russian, and Somali. Dated 7/12/06, the current VIS for tetanus-diphtheria-acellular pertussis (Tdap) vaccine is now available in Bengali, Chinese, Haitian Creole, Korean, Russian, and Urdu. IAC gratefully acknowledges the Minnesota Department of Health for the TIV translations and the New York City Department of Education and the New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene for the Tdap translations.

VISs FOR TIV VACCINE

To obtain a ready-to-print (PDF) version of the VIS for TIV vaccine in Hmong, go to:
http://www.immunize.org/vis/hm_flu04.pdf

To obtain the VIS for TIV in Russian, go to:
http://www.immunize.org/vis/ru_flu05.pdf

To obtain the VIS for TIV in Somali, go to:
http://www.immunize.org/vis/so_flu05.pdf

To obtain the VIS for TIV in English, go to:
http://www.immunize.org/vis/2flu.pdf


VISs FOR Tdap VACCINE
To obtain a ready-to-print (PDF) version of the VIS for Tdap vaccine in Bengali, go to:
http://www.immunize.org/vis/be_tdap.pdf

To obtain the VIS for Tdap vaccine in Chinese, go to:
http://www.immunize.org/vis/ch_tdap.pdf

To obtain the VIS for Tdap vaccine in Haitian Creole, go to:
http://www.immunize.org/vis/ha_tdap.pdf

To obtain the VIS for Tdap vaccine in Korean, go to:
http://www.immunize.org/vis/ko_tdap.pdf

To obtain the VIS for Tdap vaccine in Russian, go to:
http://www.immunize.org/vis/ru_tdap.pdf

To obtain the VIS for Tdap vaccine in Urdu, go to:
http://www.immunize.org/vis/ur_tdap.pdf

To obtain the VIS for Tdap vaccine in English, go to:
http://www.immunize.org/vis/tdap.pdf

For information about the use of VISs, and for VISs in more than 30 languages, visit IAC's VIS web section at http://www.immunize.org/vis

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4 Error corrected in December 2006 recommendations for eliminating hepatitis B transmission in adults

CDC published "Erratum: Vol. 55, No. RR-16" in the October 26 issue of MMWR. It concerns an error that appeared in the MMWR Recommendations and Reports titled "A Comprehensive Immunization Strategy to Eliminate Transmission of Hepatitis B Virus Infection in the United States: Recommendations of the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP), Part II: Immunization of Adults," which was published December 8, 2006. The erratum is reprinted below in its entirety.


In the MMWR Recommendations and Reports "A Comprehensive Immunization Strategy to Eliminate Transmission of Hepatitis B Virus Infection in the United States: Recommendations of the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP), Part II: Immunization of Adults," an error occurred. In Appendix A, page 28, second column, line 10, the sentence should read, "However, long-term protection has been demonstrated only for persons who have completed a licensed vaccination series and have ever had an anti-HBs concentration of >=10 mIU/mL; persons with an anti-HBs-positive result but who did not complete a vaccine schedule might not have long-term protection from HBV infection."


To access a web-text (HTML) version of the erratum, go to:
http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/mm5642a7.htm

To access a ready-to-print (PDF) version of "A Comprehensive Immunization Strategy to Eliminate Transmission of Hepatitis B Virus Infection in the United States: Recommendations of the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP), Part II: Immunization of Adults," go to:
http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/PDF/rr/rr5516.pdf

To receive a FREE electronic subscription to MMWR (which includes new ACIP statements), go to:
http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/mmwrsubscribe.html

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5 CDC launches its redesigned Spanish-language website, "CDC en Espanol"

On October 19, CDC announced the launch of its redesigned Spanish-language website, "CDC en Espanol." As was done with CDC's English-language website, the Spanish website was redesigned with a more user-friendly layout and a more powerful search engine.

"CDC en Espanol" provides Hispanic communities with information on a range of health promotion and disease prevention topics, including immunization. The site receives more than 6 million visitors a year, and its weekly distribution list has grown to almost 6,000 members in over 40 countries around the world.

To access "CDC en Espanol," go to: http://www.cdc.gov/spanish

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6 October 25 issue of IAC's Hep Express electronic newsletter now online

The October 25 issue of Hep Express, an electronic newsletter published by IAC, is now available online. It is intended for health professionals, program planners, and advocates involved in prevention, screening, and treatment of viral hepatitis.

IAC Express has already covered some of the information presented in the October 25 Hep Express; titles of articles we have not yet covered follow.

  • CDC posts hepatitis A Q&As for healthcare professionals
  • CDC releases National Immunization Survey data on hepatitis B birth dose
  • HBF [Hepatitis B Foundation] posts fall 2007 issue of "B Informed" newsletter on its website
  • Journal articles you may have missed

To access the October 25 issue, go to:
http://www.hepprograms.org/hepexpress/issue63.asp

To sign up for a free subscription to Hep Express, go to:
http://www.immunize.org/subscribe

To access previous issues of Hep Express, go to:
http://www.hepprograms.org/hepexpress

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7 October issue of CDC's Immunization Works electronic newsletter available on CDC website

The October issue of Immunization Works, a monthly email newsletter published by CDC, is available on the website of the National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases (NCIRD). The newsletter offers members of the immunization community non-proprietary information about current topics. CDC encourages its wide dissemination.

Some of the information in the October issue has already appeared in previous issues of IAC Express. Following is the text of four articles we have not covered.


MEETINGS, CONFERENCES & RESOURCES

NOMINATE ACIP MEMBERS: CDC is soliciting proposals for nominations of candidates to fill upcoming vacancies on the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP). The terms of appointment for three of ACIP's fifteen members will expire on June 30, 2008, and three new members will be selected to serve 4-year terms beginning on July 1, 2008. The deadline for receipt of applications is November 16, 2007. Consult the ACIP Nominations page [http://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/recs/acip/req-nominate.htm] of the ACIP website for more information.


GET READY FOR NIC: The 42nd National Immunization Conference (NIC) is now accepting abstracts. The conference will be held from March 1720, 2008, in Atlanta, Georgia, and comprises six topic tracks: Adolescent and Adult Vaccination, Epidemiology and New Vaccines, Health and Risk Communication, Immunization Information Systems, Influenza, and Programmatic Issues. To submit abstracts, register, or reserve your hotel room, visit the NIC website [http://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/events/nic]. Any questions can be addressed to the Conference Planning Team at nipnic@cdc.gov


ON-SITE TRAINING IN ATLANTA: A two-day Epidemiology and Prevention of Vaccine-Preventable Diseases course will be held in Atlanta on April 15 and 16, 2008, at CDC. Course registration and information will be posted soon at CDC's Vaccine website on the On-site Training page [http://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/ed/onsite-trg.htm].


UPCOMING BROADCASTS, WEBCASTS, AND NET CONFERENCES: Please mark your calendars for the December 13, 2007 satellite broadcast from CDC's National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases (NCIRD). More information about this broadcast and other training opportunities can be found at the CDC Vaccine Education and Training website [http://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/ed/default.htm].

To access the complete October issue from CDC's Vaccines & Immunizations website, go to:
http://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/news/newsltrs/imwrks/2007/200710.htm

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8 CDC's Seasonal Flu web section posts updated materials

CDC recently updated these materials on its Seasonal Flu web section:

  • "Antiviral Drugs and Influenza" (10/19/07)
  • "Key Facts About Influenza and Influenza Vaccine" (10/19/07)
  • "Influenza Symptoms, Protection, and What to Do if You Get Sick" (10/19/07)
  • "Key Facts About Seasonal Flu Vaccine" (10/19/07)

To access these resources, go to: http://www.cdc.gov/flu/whatsnew.htm#updated and click on the pertinent link.

To access a broad range of continually updated information on seasonal influenza, avian influenza, pandemic influenza, and swine influenza, go to: http://www.cdc.gov/flu

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9 WHO reports that projected production of pandemic influenza vaccine has increased significantly

On October 23, the World Health Organization (WHO) issued a press release announcing that the projection for pandemic influenza vaccine production has been revised upward. Portions of the press release are reprinted below.


Recent scientific advances and increased vaccine manufacturing capacity have prompted experts to increase their projections of how many pandemic influenza vaccine courses can be made available in the coming years.

Last spring, the World Health Organization (WHO) and vaccine manufacturers said that about 100 million courses of pandemic influenza vaccine based on the H5N1 avian influenza strain could be produced immediately with standard technology. Experts now anticipate that global production capacity will rise to 4.5 billion pandemic immunization courses per year in 2010.

"With influenza vaccine production capacity on the rise, we are beginning to be in a much better position vis-a-vis the threat of an influenza pandemic," Dr. Marie-Paule Kieny, director of the Initiative for Vaccine Research at WHO, said today. "However, although this is significant progress, it is still far from the 6.7 billion immunization courses that would be needed in a six-month period to protect the whole world.

"Accelerated preparedness activities must continue, backed by political impetus and financial support, to further bridge the still substantial gap between supply and demand," she said. . . .

To access the complete press release, go to:
http://www.who.int/mediacentre/news/releases/2007/pr60/en

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10.  FDA, NIH, and WHO plan public workshop on pandemic influenza vaccine development for December 10-11

FDA, in cooperation with the National Institutes of Health and the World Health Organization, is holding a public workshop, "Immune Correlates of Protection Against Influenza A Viruses in Support of Pandemic Vaccine Development." It is planned for December 10-11 in Bethesda, MD.

The workshop will include discussions on (1) current knowledge regarding correlates of protection against seasonal influenza, (2) immune responses to avian influenza infections and vaccines for novel influenza viruses in humans, (3) assays to evaluate vaccine immunogenicity, and (4) evaluation of avian influenza vaccine efficacy.

The registration deadline is November 19. Early registration is recommended because seating is limited. There will be no on-site registration. For a registration form, go to: http://www.fda.gov/cber/meetings/panflu121007reg.pdf

For additional information, contact Maureen Hess by phone at (301) 827-5113 or by email at maureen.hess@fda.hhs.gov

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11.  Draft of pandemic influenza vaccine allocation plan now online; public comment will be sought

On October 23, the federal government posted "Draft Guidance on Allocating and Targeting Pandemic Influenza Vaccine" on the PandemicFlu website. To access the document, go to: http://www.pandemicflu.gov/vaccine/prioritization.pdf

Comments on the draft will be sought through public meetings, stakeholder meetings, web-based public dialog, and requests for comment posted at the PandemicFlu website [http://www.pandemicflu.gov] and in the Federal Register.

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Immunization Action Coalition  •  1573 Selby Ave  •  St. Paul, MN 55104
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This website is supported in part by a cooperative agreement from the National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases (Grant No. 5U38IP000290) at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in Atlanta, GA. The website content is the sole responsibility of IAC and does not necessarily represent the official views of CDC.