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Issue 1330
Issue 1330: October 11, 2017

Ask the Experts
Ask the Experts—Question of the Week: Please explain why pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine is . . . read more


TOP STORIES


IAC HANDOUTS


WORLD NEWS


FEATURED RESOURCES


JOURNAL ARTICLES AND NEWSLETTERS


EDUCATION AND TRAINING

 


TOP STORIES


Webinar from CDC and NVPO on understanding and addressing parent questions about child vaccines scheduled for October 17  

On October 17 from 12:00 p.m.–1:00 p.m. (ET), CDC and the National Vaccine Program Office (NVPO) will present a webinar titled "Understanding and Addressing Parent Questions about Childhood Vaccines: Insights from Recent Communications Research and Practice." Many parents have questions about vaccines, and some are delaying or refusing vaccinations altogether; learn how to better work with these parents from experts in pediatrics, health communications, and vaccine confidence.

This webinar is a collaboration between CDC’s Current Issues in Immunization NetConference series and NVPO's UpShot Webinar series. Continuing education credit is available.

Registration (required) is open now. Attendance for each live webinar is limited to 1,500 registrants. CDC advises registrants to log in early to secure a virtual “seat.” Should you miss the live event, you can watch the archived version when it is posted later on CDC’s website.

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CDC reports on influenza activity in the United States and world from May 21 through September 23

CDC published Update: Influenza Activity—United States and Worldwide, May 21–September 23, 2017 in the October 6 issue of MMWR (pages 1043–51). A summary made available to the press is reprinted below.

There was low-level seasonal influenza activity from May 21 to September 23, 2017, in the United States. Influenza B viruses predominated from late May through late June, and influenza A viruses predominated beginning in early July. Influenza A H1N1pdm09, influenza A H3N2, and influenza B viruses were detected in the United States and worldwide. Typical seasonal patterns of influenza activity were seen in Southern Hemisphere countries. The majority of the influenza viruses from the United States and other countries analyzed at CDC were similar to the reference viruses representing the recommended components for the 2017–18 vaccine.

CDC recommends yearly influenza vaccination for all people 6 months of age and older who do not have contraindications. Vaccination by the end of October is recommended, if possible, but should continue throughout the influenza season as long as influenza viruses are circulating and unexpired vaccine is available. While a yearly influenza vaccination is the best way to prevent influenza, treatment with influenza antiviral medications as soon as possible after the onset of illness is recommended for patients with confirmed or suspected influenza who have severe, complicated, or progressive illness; who require hospitalization; or who are at high risk for influenza complications. Antiviral drugs work best when started within two days of getting sick. Although summer influenza activity in the United States was low, seasonal and novel influenza cases and outbreaks occurred during summer months. Clinicians should remain vigilant in considering novel influenza virus infections in people with influenza-like illness and swine or poultry exposure, or with severe acute respiratory infection after travel to areas where avian influenza viruses have been detected. 


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IAC Spotlight! IAC's Administering Vaccines handouts web page contains valuable, easy-to-find resources for healthcare professionals  

IAC’s Administering Vaccines handouts web page contains some of IAC's most popular and valuable resources for healthcare professionals who administer vaccines. This page makes it easy to find the resources you need. Some of the titles you'll find are:

There are many more staff education materials available for you on IAC's Administering Vaccines Handouts web page.  Bookmark this page for future reference.

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Registration now open for CDC’s 48th National Immunization Conference on May 15–17, 2018

Registration is now open for the 48th National Immunization Conference (NIC), scheduled for May 15–17 at the Hilton Hotel in Atlanta. NIC brings together more than 1,500 local, state, federal, and private-sector immunization stakeholders and partners to explore science, policy, education, and planning issues related to immunization and vaccine-preventable diseases.

The NIC mission is to offer information that will help participants provide comprehensive immunization services for all age groups. The conference also offers participants an opportunity to learn innovative strategies for developing programs and policies, and for advancing science to promote immunization among all ages today for a healthy tomorrow. 

This three-day conference will include the following session tracks:

  • Adult Immunization
  • Immunization Information Systems
  • Programmatic Issues
  • Health and Risk Communications
  • Epidemiology and Surveillance
  • Childhood/Adolescent Immunization 

Access the National Immunization Conference (NIC) web page, which includes information about conference and hotel registration, fees, abstract submission, and more

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October 15–21 is International Infection Prevention Week

This year, International Infection Prevention Week (IIPW) will be held October 15–21, with the theme of "Antibiotic Resistance." IIPW, part of the Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology's (APIC) Infection Prevention and You campaign, helps patients, families, and healthcare professionals better understand their role in preventing infections. Since its start in 1986, this week of recognition has vastly expanded to every corner of the globe, including Australia, the United Kingdom, the Middle East, and Southeast Asia. As the reach of IIPW widens, more patients benefit from safer healthcare practices and reduced threat of healthcare-associated infections.



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IAC HANDOUTS


New! IAC develops "Don’t Be Guilty of These Preventable Errors in Vaccine Administration," a new resource for healthcare professionals

IAC has developed Don’t Be Guilty of These Preventable Errors in Vaccine Administration, a 4-page print resource describing common but preventable errors made in vaccine administration. This resource also provides information about what to do when errors are made and links to resources that will help prevent errors in the future.

This new resource is a companion piece to IAC's Don't Be Guilty of these Preventable Errors in Vaccine Storage and Handling!

IAC's Handouts for Patients & Staff web section offers healthcare professionals and the public more than 250 FREE English-language handouts (many also available in translation), which we encourage website users to print out, copy, and distribute widely.

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New! IAC develops resource for healthcare professionals titled "Strategies to Improve Adult Vaccination Coverage"

IAC recently developed a new print resource to help healthcare professionals improve vaccination coverage of adults. The 2-page Strategies to Improve Adult Vaccination Coverage provides information on the following proven effective strategies to improve adult immunization rates:

  • Unequivocal provider recommendation
  • Standing orders protocols
  • Reminder and recall systems
  • Assessment and feedback
  • Expansion of patient access

A few simple improvements in office practices can save many lives. Check out this new resource to explore ways you can incorporate these effective strategies into your practice and protect your adult patients against vaccine-preventable diseases.

View the new IAC resource: Strategies to Improve Adult Vaccination Coverage. 

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IAC posts updated "Standing Orders for Administering Tdap/Td Vaccine to Children Age 7 Years and Older"

IAC recently updated its guidance document titled Standing Orders for Administering Tdap/Td Vaccine to Children Age 7 Years and Older. This resource was updated to expand this standing order into the new IAC format of incorporating lists in bullet form and also using charts and tables whenever possible (e.g., needle length and gauge; detailed information about scheduling and spacing vaccination for infants and children who fall behind). 

Related Link

  • IAC's Standing Orders web section contains standing orders templates for administering all routinely recommended vaccines and for the medical management of vaccine reactions

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WORLD NEWS


WHO publishes news release on October 3 regarding new global strategy to reduce cholera deaths by 90% by 2030

The World Health Organization (WHO) published a news release on October 3 titled Partners commit to reduce cholera deaths by 90% by 2030. The beginning paragraphs of the news release appear below:

An ambitious new strategy to reduce deaths from cholera by 90% by 2030 will be launched tomorrow by the Global Task Force on Cholera Control (GTFCC), a diverse network of more than 50 UN and international agencies, academic institutions, and NGOs that supports countries affected by the disease.

Cholera kills an estimated 95,000 people and affects 2.9 million more every year. Urgent action is needed to protect communities, prevent transmission, and control outbreaks.


Access the full news release: Partners commit to reduce cholera deaths by 90% by 2030.

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FEATURED RESOURCES


CDC and Georgia Tech release parent-friendly "Catch-up Childhood and Adolescent Immunization Online Tool"

CDC has announced the release of a parent-friendly online immunization tool to help keep track of immunizations for one's child. Using this tool, parents can:
  • Generate a catch-up or accelerated schedule that identifies doses and timing of vaccines needed (useful when a child needs to travel, must catch-up on missed doses, or during a disease outbreak)
  • Save and update the child’s vaccination history on your computer
  • Print a personalized vaccination schedule

Access the Catch-up Childhood and Adolescent Immunization Online Tool.

This tool was developed in collaboration with Georgia Tech and is based on the 2017 Childhood and Adolescent Immunization Schedule recommended by ACIP, AAP, AAFP, and ACOG.

Note: Healthcare professionals should not use this tool for immunization decisions; rather, they should refer to their state's Immunization Information System.

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NFID releases two campaign toolkits to educate consumers and healthcare professionals about the importance of protecting older adults against influenza

To help educate consumers and healthcare professionals (HCPs) about the importance of protecting adults age 65+ against influenza, the National Foundation for Infectious Diseases (NFID) has developed two new campaign toolkits with valuable resources. 

Toolkit #1: Care For Older Adults? Care About Flu!
To help initiate a dialogue between older adult patients and HCPs about the importance of annual influenza vaccination and specific vaccines most beneficial for them, NFID created the “Care for Older Adults? Care About Flu!” toolkit, containing educational materials as well as customizable resources that can be used to remind patients about the importance of annual flu vaccination. Toolkit materials include a fact sheet on the risks of flu in older adults, an infographic to illustrate the unique risks and potential complications of flu among older adults, customizable scripts to help guide conversations with patients, a 30-second public service announcement video, and additional resources to ensure that patients get the protection against influenza that they deserve. To access the toolkit and related resources, visit www.nfid.org/flu65.

Toolkit #2: Flu Alert
The Flu Alert campaign was developed to help increase awareness about the devastating impact that influenza can have on adults age 65 years and older. The goal of the campaign is to make annual flu vaccination a priority for older adults who are among the most vulnerable to flu and related complications. Resources include a fact sheet, an infographic, and a public service announcement (PSA) video, featuring spokesperson Judith Light. To access the campaign materials, go to www.nfid.org/flualert.

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Influenza is serious; many resources are available to help healthcare professionals vaccinate patients

Influenza vaccination is recommended for everyone six months of age and older. If you don't provide influenza vaccination in your clinic, please recommend vaccination to your patients and refer them to a clinic or pharmacy that provides vaccines or to the HealthMap Vaccine Finder to locate sites near their workplaces or homes that offer influenza vaccination services.

Following is a list of resources related to influenza disease and vaccination for healthcare professionals and the public:

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Free app of The Vaccine Handbook available from the Immunization Action Coalition

A new app of The Vaccine Handbook is now available from the Immunization Action Coalition. The free app, which is available for Apple iPhones and iPads only, contains the complete 2017 (6th) edition of The Vaccine Handbook (“The Purple Book”), by Dr. Gary Marshall, professor of pediatrics and chief of the Division of Pediatric Infectious Diseases at the University of Louisville. The app is fully searchable, with functionality that includes bookmarking, highlighting, user annotation, and links to important vaccination resources.

"The Purple Book" is a comprehensive source of vaccine information, drawing together vaccine science, guidance, and practice into a user-friendly resource for the private office, public health clinic, academic medical center, classroom, and hospital. The first section provides background on vaccine immunology, development, infrastructure, policy, standards, implementation, special circumstances, and—perhaps most importantly—addressing concerns. The second section contains details about every vaccine currently licensed in the U.S., including the burden and epidemiology of the respective disease, history of the immunization program, vaccine constituents, efficacy, safety, and recommendations.

The free app may be found by searching the iTunes App Store for “The Vaccine Handbook App” or clicking on the following link:
https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/the-vaccine-handbook-app/id1043246009?ls=1&mt=8.

Print copies of the book ($34.95 each; bulk discounts are available from the publisher) can be ordered from the Immunization Action Coalition website at www.immunize.org/vaccine-handbook.

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JOURNAL ARTICLES AND NEWSLETTERS


September issue of CDC's Immunization Works newsletter now available

CDC recently released the September issue of its monthly newsletter Immunization Works and posted it on the website of the National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases (NCIRD). The newsletter offers the immunization community information about current topics. The information is in the public domain and can be reproduced and circulated widely.

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CDC reports on human adenovirus surveillance in the United States

CDC published Human Adenovirus Surveillance—United States, 2003–2016 in the October 6 issue of MMWR (pages 1039–42). A summary made available to the press is reprinted below.

CDC initiated the National Adenovirus Type Reporting System (NATRS) in 2014 to monitor trends in circulating human adenovirus types in the United States, which can be useful to inform diagnostic and surveillance activities by clinicians and public health practitioners. Human adenoviruses (HAdVs) are associated with a wide spectrum of clinical illness including respiratory illness, gastroenteritis, and conjunctivitis. More than 60 HAdV genotypes have been identified to date. Severity of HAdV illness can range from asymptomatic infections to severe illness and death. Although cases are frequently reported sporadically, outbreaks of HAdV have been reported globally in a variety of settings. CDC initiated the NATRS in 2014 to monitor trends in circulating HAdV types in the United States. Year-to-year fluctuations in HAdV types circulating in the U.S. varied considerably during the surveillance period. Surveillance for circulating HAdV types in the U.S. can be useful to inform diagnostic and surveillance activities by clinicians and public health practitioners.

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EDUCATION AND TRAINING


AAFP webinar on influenza vaccination now archived and available for viewing

On September 26, the American Academy of Family Physicians (AAFP) sponsored a webinar for healthcare professionals titled "Benefits of the Influenza Vaccine for Adults 65 and Older." This webinar is now available online to watch at your convenience. At the conclusion of the webcast, participants should be able to:

  • Review primary updates to the current influenza guidance and recommendations
  • Establish consistent team-based messaging about the vaccine
  • Better understand how to bill and code for vaccinations
  • Identify and address knowledge gaps in vaccine choices for all age groups
  • Dispel existing myths and misconceptions surrounding the influenza vaccine

Access the AAFP webcast: Benefits of the Influenza Vaccine for Adults 65 and Older.

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Final reminder: Last segment of CDC webinar series on "The Pink Book" chapter topics airs on October 11

CDC is presenting a 15-part webinar series to provide a chapter-by-chapter overview of the 13th edition of Epidemiology and Prevention of Vaccine-Preventable Diseases (also known as "The Pink Book"). This is a live series of weekly 1-hour webinars that started June 14 and will run through October 11. Recordings of sessions will be available online within 2 weeks after each webinar. All sessions begin at 12:00 p.m. (ET). Continuing education will be available for each event.

The webinar series will provide an overview of vaccines and the diseases they prevent, general recommendations for vaccines, vaccination principles, and immunization strategies for providers. 

Registration and more information is available on CDC's Pink Book Webinar Series web page.

All the sections of "The Pink Book" (i.e., chapters, appendices, 2017 supplement) are available to download at no charge at www.cdc.gov/vaccines/pubs/pinkbook/index.html.

You can also order this resource from the Public Health Foundation for $40 plus shipping and handling. This print version does not include the 2017 supplement.

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ASK THE EXPERTS

Question of the Week

Please explain why pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine is recommended for smokers or people with diabetes younger than age 65 but pneumococcal conjugate vaccine is not recommended for these groups. 

The level of risk for pneumococcal disease in smokers and people with diabetes is not as high as in immunocompromised persons, and persons with asplenia, HIV infection, hematologic cancer, or with cochlear implant. Because of the lower risk, ACIP recommended that smokers and people with diabetes receive only pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine (PPSV, Pneumovax 23; Merck) once before age 65 years, and the pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV, Prevnar 13; Pfizer) at age 65 years or older. At this age, pneumococcal disease rates increase regardless of health status. More information on this issue is available at https://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/pdf/wk/mm6140.pdf and https://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/pdf/wk/mm5934.pdf.


About IAC's Question of the Week

Each week, IAC Express highlights a new, topical, or important-to-reiterate Q&A. This feature is a cooperative venture between IAC and CDC. William L. Atkinson, MD, MPH, IAC's associate director for immunization education, chooses a new Q&A to feature every week from a set of Q&As prepared by experts at CDC’s National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases.

We hope you enjoy this feature and find it helpful when dealing with difficult real-life scenarios in your vaccination practice. Please encourage your healthcare professional colleagues to sign up to receive IAC Express at www.immunize.org/subscribe.

If you have a question for the CDC immunization experts, you can email them directly at nipinfo@cdc.gov. There is no charge for this service.

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About IAC Express
The Immunization Action Coalition welcomes redistribution of this issue of IAC Express or selected articles. When you do so, please add a note that the Immunization Action Coalition is the source of the material and provide a link to this issue.

If you have trouble receiving or displaying IAC Express messages, visit our online help section.

IAC Express is supported in part by Grant No. 6NH23IP922550 from the National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases, CDC. Its contents are solely the responsibility of IAC and do not necessarily represent the official views of CDC. IAC Express is also supported by educational grants from the following companies: AstraZeneca, Inc.; Merck Sharp & Dohme Corp.; Pfizer, Inc.; and Sanofi Pasteur.

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Issue Abbreviations
AAFP: American Academy of Family Physicians
AAP: American Academy of Pediatrics
ACIP: Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices
CDC: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
FDA: Food and Drug Administration
IAC: Immunization Action Coalition
MMWR: Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report
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