Home
|
About IAC
|
Contact
|
A-Z Index
|
Donate
|
Shop
|
SUBSCRIBE
Immunization Action Coalition
IAC Home
|
IAC Express
|
2017 Issues
|
Issue 1295
Issue 1295: March 22, 2017

Ask the Experts
Ask the Experts—Question of the Week: If a patient receives hepatitis B vaccine while undergoing hemodialysis, . . . read more


TOP STORIES


IAC HANDOUTS


OFFICIAL RELEASES AND ANNOUNCEMENTS


FEATURED RESOURCES


JOURNAL ARTICLES AND NEWSLETTERS


EDUCATION AND TRAINING


CONFERENCES AND MEETINGS

 


TOP STORIES


CDC clarifies footnote in 2017 schedule about birth dose of hepatitis B vaccine given within 24 hours of birth

Each February, the U.S. Recommended Immunization Schedule for Children and Adolescents is published by the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP), American Academy of Family Physicians, American Academy of Pediatrics, and American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists to reflect current recommendations for licensed vaccines.
 
This year, an "easy-to-miss" but significant change was made to the timing of the first dose of hepatitis B vaccine (HepB birth dose) when administered to infants born to women who are not infected with the hepatitis B virus (HBV), i.e., women who are hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg)-negative.

In the 2016 schedule, the first bullet in the footnote for hepatitis B vaccine read: "At birth: Administer monovalent HepB vaccine to all newborns before hospital discharge." In the 2017 schedule, the first bullet in the same footnote section reads: "At birth: Administer monovalent HepB vaccine to all newborns within 24 hours of birth." 

This change reemphasizes the importance of the timeliness of this dose as a safety net to protect newborns from becoming infected with hepatitis B at birth and developing chronic HBV disease later in life.

On March 6, CDC posted clarification about this guidance on its Child and Teen Immunization Schedule web page (see “Changes to the Schedule" section). The additional text clarifies the recommendations for infants whose mothers' HBsAg status is unknown or positive and for low birth weight infants, as follows: 

  •  Monovalent hepatitis B vaccine should be administered within 24 hours of birth for medically stable infants weighing ≥2,000 grams born to hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg)-negative mothers. The recommendations for vaccination of infants <2,000 grams (as well as infants born to HBsAg-positive mothers or mothers whose hepatitis B status is unknown) remain unchanged.
  • Preterm infants weighing <2,000 g born to HBsAg-negative mothers should receive the first dose of vaccine 1 month after birth or at hospital discharge.    

The clarification concludes by noting that “Additional detail regarding hepatitis B vaccination of infants born to HBsAg-positive mothers or mothers whose hepatitis B status is unknown can be found in the ACIP hepatitis B recommendations.” [dated December 23, 2005]

Back to top


CDC NetConference about the 2017 immunization schedules to be held on March 29

CDC will present a one-hour Current Issues in Immunization NetConference on March 29 at 12:00 p.m. (ET). The speakers and topics will be:

  • "Update on 2017 Child/Adolescent Immunization Schedule," Candice L. Robinson, MD, MPH, Communications and Education Branch, Immunization Services Division, National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases (NCIRD), CDC
  • "Update on 2017 Adult Immunization Schedule," David Kim, MD, deputy associate director for adult immunization, Immunization Services Division, CDC

The NetConference will be moderated by Andrew Kroger, MD, MPH, medical officer, CDC, NCIRD.

This is a limited registration event. Registration is required.

Related Link

Back to top


CDC announces NetConference series about adult immunization; sessions scheduled for Wednesdays, April 12–May 31

CDC has announced a new 6-part NetConference series on vaccinating adults, that will address key issues related to protecting adults from vaccine-preventable diseases. A collaborative effort between CDC and Maryland’s adult immunization coalition and state immunization program, the "Vaccinating Adults" series will feature 6 presentations by experts in promoting, administering, and securing reimbursement for adult immunizations.

  • Wednesday, April 12—Burden of Vaccine-Preventable Diseases in Adults: Medical, Social, and Economic Costs
  • Wednesday, April 19—Provider Reimbursement for Adult Immunizations
  • Wednesday, April 26—Immunizing Adults: Immunization Schedule, Coverage, and Challenges
  • Wednesday, May 17—Immunizing Older Adults and the Chronically Ill
  • Wednesday, May 24—Immunizing Pregnant Women, Health Care Personnel, and in the Workplace
  • Wednesday, May 31—Clinic Logistics: Vaccine Administration, Storage, and Handling

Each session will start at 12:00 p.m. (ET).

Continuing education will be available for each event. The series will be archived later on CDC's website.

Advanced registration is required to participate.

Related Link

Back to top


IAC Spotlight! IAC’s ACIP recommendations web section makes guidance available in chronological order as well as alphabetically by vaccine type

IAC maintains a listing of links to vaccine recommendations from the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) at www.immunize.org/acip. The web page is searchable chronologically by publication date or alphabetically by vaccine name. It includes a historical archive of recommendations dating back to 1991.

Related Links

Back to top


Society of Teachers of Family Medicine updates its "Shots Immunization" app for 2017 as well as its "Shots Online" version 

The Group on Immunization Education of the Society of Teachers of Family Medicine (STFM) has released 2017 versions of its "Shots Immunizations" mobile app for iPhone and Android devices and its "Shots Online" resource for computers.

The "Shots Immunizations" mobile app is a downloadable application (app) for iPhones and Android devices that was developed to serve as a point-of-care tool. To download the free app, search "STFM" on your iPhone or Android app store and select the "Shots Immunizations" app.

"Shots Online" is a free, personal computer-based program covering every aspect of the current CDC immunization schedules. "Shots Online" can be used by computers, tablets, and smart phones by going to http://shotsonline.immunizationed.org.

Both versions cover the following topics:

  • Basics
  • High-Risk Indications
  • Adverse Reactions
  • Contraindications
  • Catch-Up
  • Administration
  • Risk Communication
  • Epidemiology
  • Brand Names/Coding
  • Additives
  • Resident Education
  • Pictures of vaccine-Preventable Diseases
Related Link

Autism Science Foundation's chief science officer writes article for STAT refuting claims regarding a connection between vaccines and autism

Alycia Halladay, chief scientific officer at the Autism Science Foundation, has written a piece for STAT that strongly refutes the claims about a connection between vaccines and autism. She explains the science on this issue, lists the environmental factors that—combined with genetics— are likely causes of autism, and makes a respectful plea to legislators and others for funding to follow scientifically sound leads for the causes and treatments for autism.

Access Let’s focus on the real environmental factors linked to autism. Please share this article with legislators, concerned parents, and the media.

Related Links

Back to top


IAC HANDOUTS


IAC revises two of its most popular staff education materials, "Summary of Recommendations for Child/Teen Immunization" and "Summary of Recommendations for Adult Immunization"

IAC recently updated its Summary of Recommendations for Child/Teen Immunization and Summary of Recommendations for Adult Immunization to incorporate all of the revised recommendations of ACIP that have recently been published in the 2017 child/adolescent and adults schedules. These summaries include the indications, schedule (including minimum intervals), and contraindications and precautions for all routinely recommended vaccines. The child/teen piece covers age birth through age 18 years, while the adult piece covers age 19 years and older.

Related Link

IAC's Handouts for Patients & Staff web section offers healthcare professionals and the public more than 250 FREE English-language handouts (many also available in translation), which we encourage website users to print out, copy, and distribute widely.

Back to top


IAC updates "Guide to Contraindications and Precautions to Commonly Used Vaccines" and "Guide to Contraindications and Precautions to Commonly Used Vaccines in Adults"

IAC has updated the Guide to Contraindications and Precautions to Commonly Used Vaccines and Guide to Contraindications and Precautions to Commonly Used Vaccines in Adults to incorporate all the recent ACIP recommendations.

Related Links

Back to top


OFFICIAL RELEASES AND ANNOUNCEMENTS


WHO and FDA select 2017–2018 influenza vaccine strains for the northern hemisphere

On March 2, the World Health Organization (WHO) published information about the influenza vaccine strains selected for the 2017–2018 influenza vaccines. A news release from WHO is reprinted below.

Recommended composition of influenza virus vaccines for use in the 2017–2018 northern hemisphere influenza season

It is recommended that trivalent vaccines for use in the 2017–2018 northern hemisphere influenza season contain the following:

  • an A/Michigan/45/2015 (H1N1)pdm09-like virus;
  • an A/Hong Kong/4801/2014 (H3N2)-like virus; and
  • a B/Brisbane/60/2008-like virus.

It is recommended that quadrivalent vaccines containing two influenza B viruses contain the above three viruses and a B/Phuket/3073/2013-like virus.

Access the complete WHO report: Recommended composition of influenza virus vaccines for use in the 2017- 2018 northern hemisphere influenza season

The Vaccines and Related Biological Products Advisory Committee of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) voted to back WHO's March 2 recommendations for influenza vaccine composition in the northern hemisphere for the upcoming influenza season. Three of the four recommended strains are unchanged from last season.

Access Medscape news article: FDA Committee Selects 2017–2018 Influenza Vaccine Strains (log-in required)

Related Links

Back to top


FEATURED RESOURCES


American Cancer Society offers resource for healthcare professionals titled "HPV: Just the Facts"


As part of a cooperative agreement with CDC, the American Cancer Society has developed a 6-page handout for healthcare professionals to help in discussing human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination with parents. Titled HPV: Just the Facts, this resource includes 8 facts with detailed supporting references. The facts are:

  1. The HPV vaccine is safe.
  2. The HPV vaccine does NOT cause fertility issues.
  3. The HPV vaccine does NOT contain harmful ingredients.
  4. The HPV vaccine is necessary, regardless of sexual activity.
  5. The HPV vaccine is for boys and girls. 
  6. The HPV vaccine is effective and prevents cancer.
  7. Many parents do not know about the HPV vaccine and benefit from a quality provider recommendation.
  8. The effectiveness of the HPV vaccine does not decrease over time. 

Access HPV: Just the Facts.

Related Links

Back to top


Influenza is spreading and serious; please keep vaccinating your patients

Influenza vaccination is recommended for everyone six months of age and older. If you don't provide influenza vaccination in your clinic, please recommend vaccination to your patients and refer them to a clinic or pharmacy that provides vaccines or to the HealthMap Vaccine Finder to locate sites near their workplaces or homes that offer influenza vaccination services.

Following is a list of resources related to influenza disease and vaccination for healthcare professionals and the public:

Back to top


JOURNAL ARTICLES AND NEWSLETTERS


CDC publishes report about patients testing positive for yellow fever viral RNA after mass yellow fever vaccination campaign in Angola

CDC published Notes from the Field: Investigation of Patients Testing Positive for Yellow Fever Viral RNA After Vaccination During a Mass Yellow Fever Vaccination Campaign—Angola, 2016 in the March 17 issue of MMWR (pages 282–3). The first paragraph is reprinted below.

The yellow fever outbreak declared in Angola in January 2016 soon became the largest recorded yellow fever outbreak in the country’s history. In response, the Angola Ministry of Health, supported by the World Health Organization (WHO), conducted mass yellow fever vaccination campaigns beginning in February 2016 for all persons aged ≥6 months. By June 2016, a total of 11.6 million yellow fever vaccine doses had been distributed among a national population of 25 million. Because of the urgency of distributing vaccine to stop the outbreak, surveillance for cases of yellow fever after vaccination and serious adverse events after immunization (AEFIs) was not implemented. However, CDC and the Angola Field Epidemiology and Laboratory Training Program conducted an investigation of patients with a history of yellow fever vaccination and symptoms of yellow fever disease whose specimens tested positive for yellow fever viral RNA by reverse transcription–polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) to assess whether such cases could represent vaccine failure or AEFIs.

Related Links

Back to top


EDUCATION AND TRAINING


Webinar on engaging with HPV vaccine-hesitant parents scheduled for April 13
 
The Scenic River Area Health Education Center is sponsoring a webinar titled "What is the C.A.S.E. method & how can we apply it to HPV?" on April 13 at 12:00 p.m. CT. The C.A.S.E. (Corroborate, About Me, Science, Explain/Advise) approach provides guidance to engage effectively and positively with others, and can be used when discussing the importance of vaccination with parents and patients.

The featured speaker will be Robert M. Jacobson, MD, medical director for the Population Health Science Program at Mayo Clinic's Robert D. and Patricia E. Kern Center for the Science of Health Care Delivery. He also leads Mayo's Employee and Community Health (ECH) Research Initiative.

Upon completion of this webinar, participants will be able to:
  • Articulate a strong recommendation for the HPV vaccine
  • Describe the four components of the C.A.S.E. approach
  • Demonstrate how to apply the C.A.S.E. approach in three scenarios of vaccine hesitancy

Registration (required) is open now.

Related Links

Back to top 


CONFERENCES AND MEETINGS


Iowa Immunization Summit scheduled for June 14–15; includes CDC's "Pink Book" course

The 2017 Iowa Immunization Summit will be held June 14–15 in Des Moines. The first day will feature CDC's Epidemiology and Prevention of Vaccine-Preventable Diseases ("Pink Book") course. 

Access the summit's brochure for more information on the agenda and the scheduled nationally known speakers. Register online at trainingresources.org—scroll down to the Iowa Immunization Summit entry.

Back to top


Massachusetts Adult Immunization Conference to be held April 25 in Marlborough

The 22nd Annual Massachusetts Adult Immunization Conference, "Building Networks to Vaccinate the Village," is scheduled for April 25 in Marlborough. The two plenary speakers will be David Kim, MD, MA, associate director for adult immunization, CDC, who will provide a national immunization update, and Litjen (L.J) Tan, MS, PhD, chief strategy officer, IAC, who will review the benefits of implementing standing orders in your practice.

Access more information.

Back to top
 


ASK THE EXPERTS

Question of the Week

If a patient receives hepatitis B vaccine while undergoing hemodialysis, will the vaccine be effective? Will the dose need to be repeated?  

Neither the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) nor the manufacturers address the timing of vaccination and dialysis. Persons with end-stage renal disease including predialysis, hemodialysis, peritoneal dialysis, and home dialysis should be tested for hepatitis B surface antibody (anti-HBs) 1–2 months after vaccination, and annually. If the anti-HBs level is below 10mIU/mL, they should be revaccinated. See www.cdc.gov/mmwr/PDF/rr/rr5516.pdf, page 27, for more information. 


About IAC's Question of the Week

Each week, IAC Express highlights a new, topical, or important-to-reiterate Q&A. This feature is a cooperative venture between IAC and CDC. William L. Atkinson, MD, MPH, IAC's associate director for immunization education, chooses a new Q&A to feature every week from a set of Q&As prepared by experts at CDC’s National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases.

We hope you enjoy this feature and find it helpful when dealing with difficult real-life scenarios in your vaccination practice. Please encourage your healthcare professional colleagues to sign up to receive IAC Express at www.immunize.org/subscribe.

If you have a question for the CDC immunization experts, you can email them directly at nipinfo@cdc.gov. There is no charge for this service.

Related Links

Back to top
 
About IAC Express
The Immunization Action Coalition welcomes redistribution of this issue of IAC Express or selected articles. When you do so, please add a note that the Immunization Action Coalition is the source of the material and provide a link to this issue.

If you have trouble receiving or displaying IAC Express messages, visit our online help section.

IAC Express is supported in part by Grant No. 6NH23IP922550 from the National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases, CDC. Its contents are solely the responsibility of IAC and do not necessarily represent the official views of CDC. IAC Express is also supported by educational grants from the following companies: AstraZeneca, Inc.; bioCSL Inc.; Merck Sharp & Dohme Corp.; Pfizer, Inc.; and Sanofi Pasteur.
IAC Express Disclaimer
ISSN: 1526-1786

Our mailing address is
Immunization Action Coalition
2550 University Avenue West, Suite 415 North
Saint Paul, MN 55114

Copyright (C) 2017 Immunization Action Coalition
All rights reserved.
Subscribe Today: IAC Express, Needle Tips, and Vaccinate Adults: the up-to-date immunization information you need
IAC Express
IAC Express Home
2017 Issues
2016 - 1997 Issues
immunize.org homepage
Shop IAC
Make a Donation
Follow Us
Follow IAC on Facebook
Follow IAC on Twitter
Follow IAC on YouTube
Video of the Week
Don't Suffer from Shingles: In this Mayo Clinic Minute, Mayo Clinic Dr. Vandana Bhide describes how the chickenpox virus can live in a person's nervous system for years, and then can reactivate to cause shingles. Getting shingles vaccine can help to prevent shingles and post-herpetic neuralgia.
Visit the VOTW archive
Protect Newborns Guidebook
Protect Newborns Guidebook
Comprehensive guide Hepatitis B: What Hospitals Need to Do to Protect Newborns
IAC's Free Publications
Subscribe to IAC's Free Publications!
Up-to-date immunization information, practice oriented, and CDC reviewed. Sign up today!
Patient Record Cards
Purchase IAC's patient record cards today!
Record cards for patients -- child & teen, adult, and lifetime -- are printed on durable paper and sized to fit in a wallet when folded
DVD Immunization Techniques
Purchase Immunization Techniques DVD
Every practice should have this award winning, "how-to" training video
The Vaccine Handbook (Purple Book)
Order a copy of this practical guide today!
Order your copy today!
New App available at iTunes
Calendar of Events
Conferences, meetings, and training opportunities
Conferences, meetings, and training opportunities
Technically Speaking
Read Dr. Wexler's monthly column for practical advice on vaccination topics
Read Dr. Wexler's column for the Vaccine Education Center's monthly newsletter, Vaccine Update
Editorial Information
Editor: Deborah L. Wexler, MD
Managing Editor: Teresa Anderson, DDS, MPH
Consulting Editor: Marian Deegan, JD
Assistant Managing Editor: Liv Augusta Anderson, MPP
Issue Abbreviations
AAFP: American Academy of Family Physicians
AAP: American Academy of Pediatrics
ACIP: Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices
CDC: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
FDA: Food and Drug Administration
IAC: Immunization Action Coalition
MMWR: Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report
NCIRD: National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases
VIS: Vaccine Information Statement
WHO: World Health Organization
 
 
- Guide to immunize.org -
A-Z INDEX
ABOUT IAC
ACIP RECOMMENDATIONS
ADDITIONAL RESOURCES
ADULT VACCINATION
ADULT VACCINATION GUIDE
ASK THE EXPERTS
Combination Vaccines
Diphtheria
Hepatitis A
Hepatitis B
Vaccine Storage and Handling
>> view all
BILLING & CODING
BIRTH DOSE GUIDEBOOK
CALENDAR
CDC INFORMATION
CDC SCHEDULES
CLINIC TOOLS
Administering Vaccines
Adult Vaccination
Documenting Vaccination
Scheduling Vaccination
Screening for Contraindications
Storage & Handling
Vaccine Recommendations
>> view all
COALITIONS
CONTRIBUTE TO IAC
DEAR COLLEAGUE LETTER
HPV VACCINE
DEAR COLLEAGUE LETTER
MCV4 DOSE #2
DISEASES & VACCINES
Diphtheria
Hepatitis A
Hepatitis B
Influenza
Varicella
>> view all
DONATE TO IAC
EMAIL NEWS SERVICES
EDUCATIONAL MATERIALS
FAQs
FAVORITES (WEB SECTIONS)
FDA PRODUCT APPROVALS
GIVE BIRTH TO THE END OF
HEP B
HANDOUTS FOR PATIENTS &
STAFF
Administering Vaccines
Adult Vaccination
Documenting Vaccinations
Managing Vaccine Reactions
Parent Handouts
Patient Schedules
Questions & Answers
Recommendations
Screening Checklists
Standing Orders
Storage & Handling
Talking with Parents
Temperature Logs
Top Handouts
Translations
Vaccine Index
>> view all
HEPATITIS B BIRTH DOSE
HONOR ROLLS
HepB Birth Dose
Influenza Vaccination for HCP
IAC EXPRESS
IMAGES
IMMUNIZATION TECHNIQUES
DVD
LAMINATED SCHEDULES
MANUFACTURERS
NATIONAL ADULT & INFLUENZA IMMUNIZATION SUMMIT
NEWS & INFORMATION
OFFICIAL RELEASES
ACIP
CDC
FDA
>> view all
PACKAGE INSERTS
PARTNERS
PHARMACISTS
PHOTOS
POWERPOINT SLIDE SETS
PRESS ROOM
PROTECT NEWBORNS
FROM HEP B
PUBLICATIONS
IAC Express
REGISTRIES
RESOURCE DIRECTORY
SHOP IAC
Immunization Techniques DVD
Laminated Schedules
Patient Record Cards
>> view all
SITE MAP
SLIDE SETS
STANDING ORDERS TEMPLATES
STATE INFORMATION
State Websites
State Laws
State Immunization Managers
>> view all
SUBSCRIBE
SUPPORT IAC
TECHNICALLY SPEAKING
TIMELINE FOR VACCINES
TRANSLATE FOR IAC
TRAVEL (INTERNATIONAL)
UNPROTECTED PEOPLE REPORTS
Chickenpox
Diphtheria
Hepatitis A
Hepatitis B
>> view all
VACCINATING ADULTS: A STEP-BY-STEP GUIDE
VACCINE CONCERNS
Adjuvants & Ingredients
Alternative Medicine
Autism
Importance of Vaccination
>> view all
VACCINE INFORMATION STATEMENTS
Translations
Vaccine Index
>> view all
VACCINE MANUFACTURERS
VACCINE POLICY & LICENSURE
ACIP
FDA
WHO
>> view all
VACCINE SAFETY
VACCINE TIMELINE
VACCINES & DISEASES
VIDEOS (VIDEO OF THE WEEK)
WHAT'S NEW OR UPDATED AT IAC
Handouts
VISs
Web Sections
>> view all
 
Immunization Action Coalition  •  2550 University Avenue West  •  Suite 415 North  •  Saint Paul, Minnesota  •  55114
tel 651-647-9009  •  fax 651-647-9131
 
 
 
This website is supported in part by a cooperative agreement from the National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases (Grant No. 6NH23IP22550) at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in Atlanta, GA. The website content is the sole responsibility of IAC and does not necessarily represent the official views of CDC.