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Issue 1288
Issue 1288: February 1, 2017

Ask the Experts
Ask the Experts—Question of the Week: I have a patient who was diagnosed with HPV types 16 and 18…read more


TOP STORIES


IAC HANDOUTS


FEATURED RESOURCES


JOURNAL ARTICLES AND NEWSLETTERS


EDUCATION AND TRAINING


CONFERENCES AND MEETINGS

 


TOP STORIES


IAC's Ask the Experts Q&As on meningococcal vaccination updated and divided into MenACWY and MenB sections

IAC and CDC experts recently reviewed and updated the Ask the Experts Q&As section on Immunize.org relating to meningococcal vaccination and subdivided the section into the following two pages:

IAC's Ask the Experts feature provides answers to thousands of challenging and timely questions about vaccines and their administration. The CDC experts providing answers include medical officers Andrew T. Kroger, MD, MPH; Candice L. Robinson, MD, MPH; Raymond A. Strikas, MD, MPH, FACP, FIDSA; Jessica Wing, MD, MPH; and nurse educator Donna L. Weaver, RN, MN.

Related Links

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Call to Action: Sign on! Every Child By Two asks individuals to urge Congress to protect crucial funding for immunization programs; sign-on deadline is Thursday, February 2, 3:00 p.m. (ET) 

Every Child By Two asks individuals to join in urging Congress to protect crucial funding for immunization programs. Politics aside, if and when the Affordable Care Act (ACA) is repealed, nearly $600 million in funds that currently support CDC and subsequently state immunization activities will be eliminated. Congressional funding for immunizations supports a vast web of activities, technology and personnel to keep vaccine-preventable diseases at bay, such as the following essential activities: 

  • community outreach
  • disease surveillance
  • outbreak control
  • provider and public education
  • immunization registries
  • immunization service delivery
  • staffing and implementation of the Vaccines For Children (VFC) Program (which provides free vaccines to those who qualify under a separate funding stream)

While Congress debates the replacement package for ACA, it would be very easy for vaccines to get overlooked amidst many different healthcare priorities. However, if ACA is repealed without an intentional replacement of Prevention Funds back to the Section 317/Immunization program line, the results could be catastrophic to the nation's immunization programs.

To ensure that legislators reallocate these funds, click the link to add your name or your organization's name to the 3,650 signatures currently on Every Child By Two's Vaccine Funding Support Statement

Every Child By Two (ECBT)—Carter/Bumpers Champions for Immunization—is a nonprofit organization committed to reducing the burden of vaccine-preventable diseases among people of all ages.

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Dr. Paul Offit addresses parental concerns about vaccination in a new column for The Daily Beast 

Dr. Paul A. Offit, director of the Vaccine Education Center (VEC) at the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, is now contributing weekly columns to The Daily Beast. Columns will be about popular issues related to science, not limited to vaccines. This week's column is titled Are Kids Getting Too Many Vaccines? The article addresses three common reasons parents give for delaying vaccines: 1) children receive too many vaccines, 2) children are too young to be vaccinated, and 3) not all vaccines are necessary.

You can follow Dr. Offit’s columns by visiting the relevant archive page on The Daily Beast.

Information about this new column was covered in VEC's monthly immunization-focused newsletter, Vaccine Update for Healthcare Professionals. Additional resources and information are available in the full newsletter.

Access the sign-up form to subscribe to Vaccine Update for Healthcare Professionals.

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CDC offers Medscape Expert Commentary about recognizing mumps
 

In light of the ongoing outbreaks of mumps across the nation, CDC has reminded clinicians of a 2016 Medscape Expert Commentary titled Would You Recognize Mumps? There is no cost to view this video on Medscape, but you must register. CDC has also developed a number of new educational resources about mumps for parents and college students (see links below).      
 
Related Links



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Final reminder: CDC requests nominations for its Childhood Immunization Champion Awards

The CDC Childhood Immunization Champion Award is an annual award that recognizes individuals who make a significant contribution toward improving public health through their work in childhood immunization.
 
Each year, up to one CDC Immunization Champion from each of the 50 U.S. states, eight U.S. territories and freely associated states, and the District of Columbia will be honored. Champions can include coalition members, parents, healthcare professionals (e.g., physicians, nurses, physicians’ assistants, nurse practitioners, and medical assistants), and other immunization leaders who meet the award criteria. Self-nominations are welcome, or you may submit an application for a deserving individual.

Immunization program managers, state and federal government employees paid by state or federal immunization funding, individuals who have been affiliated with and/or employed by pharmaceutical companies, and those who have already received the award are not eligible to apply (for details, see page 3 of the nomination packet).

Awardees will be announced during National Infant Immunization Week (NIIW), which runs April 22–29 this year. Champions will receive a certificate of recognition, will be featured on CDC’s website, and may be recognized by their immunization program during NIIW.

Nominations should be submitted to the Immunization Program Manager in the state or territory where the nominee resides by February 3. Please contact your state immunization program to confirm your state’s deadline. 

Related Links

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IAC HANDOUTS


IAC updates "Human Papillomavirus (HPV): A Parent's Guide to Preteen and Teen HPV Vaccination" and "HPV Vaccine: A Guide for Young Adults"

IAC has recently updated the following full-color guides for parents, teens, and young adults related to human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination:

Human Papillomavirus (HPV): A Parent's Guide to Preteen and Teen HPV Vaccination
Changes were made to incorporate updated data on HPV and related cancers and to include the new recommendation for a 2-dose vaccine series for those who begin their series before age 15 years. This resource was originally adapted from a publication developed by the Michigan Department of Community Health, Division of Immunization.

HPV Vaccine: A Guide for Young Adults 
Changes were made to remove reference to a 3-dose schedule (since current recommendations call for either 2 or 3 doses, depending on the age of the initial vaccination) and to add an easy-to-understand schedule in the box at the bottom of the page. This resource was originally adapted with permission from the Academic Pediatric Association.

Related Links

IAC's Handouts for Patients & Staff web section offers healthcare professionals and the public more than 250 FREE English-language handouts (many also available in translation), which we encourage website users to print out, copy, and distribute widely.

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IAC updates two easy-to-read Q&A handouts about human papillomavirus vaccination

IAC recently revised the following two easy-to-read fact sheets about human papillomavirus (HPV) infection and vaccination. Each includes basic information about HPV and the related vaccination recommendations. 

HPV is a serious disease...make sure your child is protected!    
Some of the changes made to this parent handout were to update some of the data for cervical cancer, and also to incorporate language that omits a precise number of doses in the schedule, since it can be either two or three.

Protect yourself from HPV...get vaccinated!
Some of the changes made to this handout for teens and young adults were to update some of the data for cervical cancer, and also to incorporate language that omits a precise number of doses in the schedule, since it can be either two or three.

Related Links

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IAC updates its standing orders template for administering pneumococcal vaccines (PCV13 and PPSV13) to adults

IAC recently revised Standing Orders for Administering Pneumococcal Vaccines (PCV13 and PPSV23) to Adults. Changes were made to clarify the sequencing and intervals of PCV13 and PPSV23 in adults younger than age 65 with no history, or an unknown history, of PCV13.

Related Link

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IAC updates its standing orders template for administering Td/Tdap to adults

IAC recently revised Standing Orders for Administering Tdap/Td Vaccine to Adults to clarify the schedule for administering the third dose of Td/Tdap (i.e., 6 to 12 months after dose #2). Also, the timing of Tdap when given during pregnancy was updated to "preferably early during the window of 27 through 36 weeks' gestation."

Related Link

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FEATURED RESOURCES


Vaccine Education Center updates two booklets in English and Spanish: "Vaccines and Teens" and "Vaccines and Adults"

The Vaccine Education Center (VEC) at the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia has recently revised two booklets to include updated information about meningococcal B and HPV vaccines. In addition, the adult booklet was revised to include information about the preferred timing of Tdap vaccine in pregnant women. To ensure that you are distributing the most recent versions of both booklets, check that you are using the fifth edition dated 2017. You can download the following revised booklets from the VEC website:

The revised booklets can also be ordered online or by using the PDF order form. Print booklets are $1 each plus shipping. 

Related Links

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CDC mails printed copies of many resources, including posters and fact sheets—order now!

CDC reminds healthcare professionals that they can order hard copies of materials by going to the CDC-INFO On Demand section of their website. To order posters and disease fact sheets related to vaccination, select “Immunization and Vaccines” under Programs, then click the Search box at the far right. You can also download materials directly from the website.

Related Link

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Influenza is spreading and serious; please keep vaccinating your patients

Influenza vaccination is recommended for everyone six months of age and older. If you don't provide influenza vaccination in your clinic, please recommend vaccination to your patients and refer them to a clinic or pharmacy that provides vaccines or to the HealthMap Vaccine Finder to locate sites near their workplaces or homes that offer influenza vaccination services.

Following is a list of resources related to influenza disease and vaccination for healthcare professionals and the public:

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JOURNAL ARTICLES AND NEWSLETTERS


Study shows that almost half of U.S. men have a genital HPV infection, but only 11% have received HPV vaccine

On January 19, Prevalence of Genital Human Papillomavirus Infection and Human Papillomavirus Vaccination Rates Among US Adult Men: National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) 2013–2014 was published in JAMA Oncology. The "Key Points" are reprinted below.

Question
What are the prevalence of both genital human papillomavirus (HPV) infection and the HPV vaccination rate among adult men in the United States?

Findings
In this cross-sectional study of the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) 2013–2014, the overall genital HPV infection prevalence among 1,868 men was 45.2%, which appears to be widespread among all age groups, with a low HPV vaccination rate of 10.7%.

Meaning 
Male HPV vaccination may have a greater effect on HPV transmission and cancer prevention in men and women than previously estimated.


Access the complete article: Prevalence of Genital Human Papillomavirus Infection and Human Papillomavirus Vaccination Rates Among US Adult Men: National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) 2013–2014.

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Risk of dying from cervical cancer in the U.S. is higher than previously estimated, according to new study

On January 23, the journal Cancer published Hysterectomy-corrected cervical cancer mortality rates reveal a larger racial disparity in the United States. The "Background" and "Conclusions" from the abstract are reprinted below.

Background
The objectives of this study were to determine the age-standardized and age-specific annual US cervical cancer mortality rates after correction for the prevalence of hysterectomy and to evaluate disparities by age and race.

Conclusions
A correction for hysterectomy has revealed that cervical cancer mortality rates are underestimated, particularly in black women. The highest rates are seen in the oldest black women, and public health efforts should focus on appropriate screening and adequate treatment in this population.


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EDUCATION AND TRAINING


CDC and SHEA to offer webinar on February 6 about communicating during a medical crisis

CDC is sponsoring a webinar, Communicating During a Crisis: What a Hospital Epidemiologist Needs to Know, in collaboration with the Society of Healthcare Epidemiology of America (SHEA) as part of the joint Outbreak Response Training Program. This webinar is the first of the Effective Communication Webinar Series, designed to train hospital epidemiologists in the interpersonal skills important in an outbreak situation. The event will take place on February 6 from 1:30–3:00 p.m. (ET), and will include the following objectives:
  • Identify the 6 core principles of Crisis Emergency Risk Communication (CERC)
  • Develop crisis communication plans that integrate emergency preparedness and institutional stakeholders
  • Create effective crisis communication templates and messages prior to an emerging infectious disease event using available CDC-provided tools and resources
  • Understand how effective communication plans must be tailored to the intended audience

Registration information

Related Link

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National Influenza Vaccination Disparities Partnership to sponsor webinar on February 9 about how to expand influenza vaccination 

On February 9 at 2:00 p.m. (ET), the National Influenza Vaccination Disparities Partnership will sponsor a webinar titled Lessons from the Field: Immunization Coalition Leaders Sharing Their Wisdom. The learning objections are:

  • Share lessons learned from experts working within immunization coalitions about mobilizing grassroots communities for flu vaccination promotion
  • Identify effective media outreach strategies to broaden messages about the benefits of flu vaccination
  • Review tips on building collaborations with diverse organizations, immunization coalitions and healthcare professionals to increase access to flu vaccines for uninsured populations

Registration information

The National Influenza Vaccination Disparities Partnership is a national multi-sector campaign, supported by CDC and spearheaded by local influential partners who commit to promote the importance of flu vaccination among underserved populations.

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CONFERENCES AND MEETINGS


World Vaccine Congress to be held April 10–12 in Washington, D.C.

The 17th Annual World Vaccine Congress will be held April 10–12 in Washington, D.C. This meeting focuses on research, development, and strategic partnering for the global vaccine industry.

More information

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ASK THE EXPERTS

Question of the Week

I have a patient who was diagnosed with HPV types 16 and 18. The patient received a properly spaced Gardasil series in 2006 when she was 25 years old. Did the HPV vaccine she received in 2006 fail to protect her?  

In clinical trials, HPV vaccines were shown to be highly effective (more than 95%) for prevention of HPV vaccine-type infection and disease among persons without prior infection. The most likely explanation for this situation is that the patient was sexually active prior to vaccination and was infected with HPV before she was vaccinated.


About IAC's Question of the Week

Each week, IAC Express highlights a new, topical, or important-to-reiterate Q&A. This feature is a cooperative venture between IAC and CDC. William L. Atkinson, MD, MPH, IAC's associate director for immunization education, chooses a new Q&A to feature every week from a set of Q&As prepared by experts at CDC’s National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases.

We hope you enjoy this feature and find it helpful when dealing with difficult real-life scenarios in your vaccination practice. Please encourage your healthcare professional colleagues to sign up to receive IAC Express at www.immunize.org/subscribe.

If you have a question for the CDC immunization experts, you can email them directly at nipinfo@cdc.gov. There is no charge for this service.

Related Links

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About IAC Express
The Immunization Action Coalition welcomes redistribution of this issue of IAC Express or selected articles. When you do so, please add a note that the Immunization Action Coalition is the source of the material and provide a link to this issue.

If you have trouble receiving or displaying IAC Express messages, visit our online help section.

IAC Express contents are solely the responsibility of IAC and do not necessarily represent the official views of CDC. IAC Express is also supported by educational grants from the following companies: AstraZeneca, Inc.; Merck Sharp & Dohme Corp.; Pfizer, Inc.; and Sanofi Pasteur.

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