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Issue 1056
IAC Express: Weekly immunization news and information
Issue 1056: May 21, 2013

TOP STORIES

VACCINE INFORMATION STATEMENTS

OFFICIAL RELEASES AND ANNOUNCEMENTS

FEATURED RESOURCES

JOURNAL ARTICLES AND NEWSLETTERS


TOP STORIES

New! May 2013 issue of Needle Tips now online
The May issue of Needle Tips is now online.
May 2013 issue of Needle Tips
This issue of Needle Tips gives healthcare professionals up-to-date information on meningococcal vaccination and features the two newly published 2013 U.S. immunization schedules, one for children/teens and one for adults. It also includes a new series of eight handouts for adults and teens about vaccine-preventable diseases and the importance of getting vaccinated, and much more. As always, the issue features the "Ask the Experts" column from CDC medical epidemiologist Andrew T. Kroger, MD, MPH; nurse educator Donna L. Weaver, RN, MN; and medical officer Iyabode Akinsanya-Beysolow, MD, MPH.

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Shortage of Pentacel, Daptacel, and Pediarix vaccines to continue through summer 2013
On May 16, CDC updated its Current Vaccine Shortages & Delays web section with the information reprinted below.

Sanofi Pasteur’s Pentacel (DTaP-IPV/Hib) and Daptacel (DTaP) are expected to remain in short supply throughout the summer of 2013. As a result of the ongoing Pentacel vaccine shortage that began in April 2012, GlaxoSmithKline (GSK) has experienced increased demand for Pediarix (DTaP-IPV-HepB) vaccine. GSK has taken steps to meet this increased demand, but will not be able to supply this vaccine at the same rate over the next 4–6 months before Pentacel is available without restrictions, which is currently anticipated to occur in September 2013.

Related Links
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IAC Spotlight! Reminder to consider using IAC’s newest educational materials for patients and staff
IAC wants to remind you that during the past year we have created several new patient handouts and staff-education materials. Please review them to see if they might be of help to you in your work setting.
  1. Easy-to-read Handouts for Adults and Teens
  2. Pneumococcal Vaccination Recommendations for Children and Adults by Age and/or Risk Factor
  3. Vaccinations for Adults with Diabetes
  4. Vaccinations for Infants and Children, Age 0–10 Years
  5. Vaccinations for Preteens and Teens, Age 11–19 Years
  6. Cocooning Protects Babies
  7. Influenza Vaccination of People with a History of Egg Allergy
  8. Meningococcal Vaccination Recommendations by Age and/or Risk Factor
  9. Current Dates of Vaccine Information Statements (VISs)
  10. Tips for Locating Old Immunization Records
  11. Decision to Not Vaccinate My Child
Related Links
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VACCINE INFORMATION STATEMENTS

CDC releases updated HPV (Gardasil) VIS
On May 17, CDC released an updated HPV (Gardasil) Vaccine Information Statement (VIS). The only substantive change to the Gardasil VIS is the removal of language relating to the manufacturer's pregnancy registry. The registry has met its goal of 5 years of enhanced surveillance and has been closed to new enrollment.

The updated VIS has an edition date of 5/17/13. Providers may use up existing stocks of the previous edition, but should make patients aware that the pregnancy registry is no longer operating.

Related Links
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OFFICIAL RELEASES AND ANNOUNCEMENTS

WHO press release: Yellow fever vaccination booster not needed
On May 17, the World Health Organization (WHO) released a statement to the press titled Yellow Fever Vaccination Booster Not Needed. The first paragraph is reprinted below.

The yellow fever ‘booster’ vaccination given ten years after the initial vaccination is not necessary, according to WHO. An article published in WHO’s Weekly Epidemiological Record (WER) reveals that the Organization’s Strategic Advisory Group of Experts on immunization (SAGE) has reviewed the latest evidence and concluded that a single dose of vaccination is sufficient to confer life-long immunity against yellow fever disease.

The entire SAGE report can be read in the May 17 issue of WER. The yellow fever information is found on pages 208-210.

Related Links
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FEATURED RESOURCES

Vaccine Education Center offers new booklet for parents about vaccine safety
The Vaccine Education Center (VEC) of the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia has developed a new resource for parents. Vaccine Safety and Your Child is a 32-page booklet by Paul Offit, MD, and Charlotte Moser, BS. The booklet's content is excerpted from the book Vaccines and Your Child: Separating Fact from Fiction, which was published by Columbia University Press in 2011.

Booklet sections include
  • General Questions about Vaccine Safety
  • Questions about the Vaccine Schedule
  • Do Vaccines Cause_______?
  • What's in the Vaccine Vial?
The booklet, available in English and Spanish, can be downloaded or ordered for $1/booklet plus shipping.

Related Links
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CDC offers free Spanish-language posters that promote childhood immunization
CDC has free Spanish-language posters available that healthcare providers can order to promote childhood immunization efforts. These posters are part of the CDC campaign that has the tagline Con salud, todo es posible. Vacune a sus hijos. (With health, all is possible. Vaccinate your children.). The materials included in the campaign are not simply translations of English materials. Rather, the campaign materials were developed for Spanish-speaking parents of children under age two years.

View posters and download or order

Other materials available as part of the campaign include Back to top


Order IAC's popular full-size laminated versions of the 2013 U.S. immunization schedules today!
IAC's laminated versions of the 2013 U.S. child/teen and adult immunization schedules are covered with a tough, washable coating that lets them stand up to a year's worth of use in every area of your healthcare setting where immunizations are given. Each has six pages (i.e., three double-sided pages) and is folded to measure 8.5" by 11".


IAC's Laminated Child and Teen Immunization SchedulesIAC's Laminated Adult Immunization Schedules

Laminated schedules are printed in color for easy reading, come complete with essential tables and footnotes, and include contraindications and precautions—a feature that will help you make an on-the-spot determination about the safety of vaccinating patients of any age.

PRICING
1-4 copies: $7.50 each
5-19 copies: $5.50 each
20-99 copies: $4.50 each
100-499 copies: $4.00 each
500-999 copies: $3.50 each

For quotes on customizing or placing orders for 1,000 copies or more, call (651) 647-9009 or email admininfo@immunize.org

You can access specific information on both schedules, view images of both, order online, or download an order form at the Shop IAC: Laminated Schedules web page.

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JOURNAL ARTICLES AND NEWSLETTERS

Pediatrics publishes results of CDC study on rotavirus vaccine safety
On May 13, Pediatrics published online results of a CDC study on rotavirus vaccine safety titled Intussusception After Rotavirus Vaccines Reported to US VAERS, 2006–2012. The abstract is reprinted below.

BACKGROUND: In 2006 and 2008, 2 new rotavirus vaccines (RotaTeq [RV5] and Rotarix [RV1]) were introduced in the United States.

METHODS: We assessed intussusception events reported to the Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System from February 2006 through April 2012 for RV5 and from April 2008 through April 2012 for RV1. For RV5, we conducted a self-controlled risk interval analysis using Poisson regression to estimate the daily reporting ratio (DRR) of intussusception comparing average daily reports 3 to 6 versus 0 to 2 days after vaccination. We calculated reporting rate differences based on DRRs and background rates of intussusception. Sensitivity analyses were conducted to assess effects of differential reporting completeness and inaccuracy of baseline rates. Few reports were submitted after RV1, allowing only a descriptive analysis.

RESULTS: The Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System received 584 confirmed intussusception reports after RV5 and 52 after RV1, with clustering 3 to 6 days after both vaccines. The DRR comparing the 3- to 6-day and the 0- to 2-day periods after RV5 dose 1 was 3.75 (95% confidence interval = 1.90 to 7.39). There was no significant increase in reporting after dose 2 or dose 3. Over all 3 doses, the excess risk of intussusception was 0.79 events (95% confidence interval = –0.04 to 1.62) per 100,000 vaccinations. From the sensitivity analyses, we conclude that under a worst-case scenario, the DRR could be 5.00 and excess risk per 100,000 doses could be 1.36.

CONCLUSIONS: We observed a persistent clustering of reported intussusception events 3 to 6 days after the first dose of RV5 vaccination. This clustering could translate to a small increased risk of intussusception, which is outweighed by the benefits of rotavirus vaccination.


The complete article is available online for Pediatrics subscribers only.

Related Links
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CDC publishes report on hepatitis B virus transmission in assisted-living facilities
CDC published Notes from the Field: Transmission of HBV Among Assisted-Living–Facility Residents—Virginia, 2012 in the May 17 issue of MMWR (page 389). Excerpts from the report are reprinted below.

On June 29, 2012, the Rappahannock Area Health District in northwestern Virginia received a report of an acute hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection in an elderly resident of an assisted-living facility (ALF). The resident reported no risk factors for HBV infection except assisted monitoring of blood glucose (AMBG), which has been implicated in the transmission of HBV in ALFs and other long-term–care facilities.... ALF staff members routinely used pen-shaped lancing devices on multiple residents during AMBG, in contrast with long-standing recommendations and standards of care.... Among the 55 residents tested, two acutely and two chronically HBV-infected patients were identified; all were aged >60 years and receiving AMBG, none shared rooms.... Training ALF and home health agency staff members on the proper methods for AMBG and increased oversight to measure adherence to safe diabetes-care practices remain critical public health priorities to prevent outbreaks of bloodborne pathogens in ALFs.

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CDC announces Hepatitis Awareness Month and Hepatitis Testing Day in MMWR
CDC published Announcement: Hepatitis Awareness Month and National Hepatitis Testing Day—May 2013 in the May 17 issue of MMWR (page 390). The announcement is reprinted below.

In the United States, an estimated 3.5–5.3 million persons have chronic hepatitis B or chronic hepatitis C, and as many as three fourths of those with hepatitis C are unaware they are infected. To increase provider and public awareness of viral hepatitis and the need for testing, May has been designated Hepatitis Awareness Month, and May 19 is recognized as National Hepatitis Testing Day.

Testing of persons to assess current infection with hepatitis C virus, especially those born during 1945–1965 (i.e., "baby boomers"), who have a higher prevalence of chronic hepatitis C than other birth cohorts, is an important step in achieving the viral hepatitis prevention goals set forth by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. CDC also has published updated testing guidance for clinicians and laboratorians to ensure the identification of persons with current hepatitis C virus infection.

To promote viral hepatitis awareness beyond Hepatitis Awareness Month, CDC's Division of Viral Hepatitis will partner with the National Hepatitis B United Coalition (Hep B United) to release a national, multilingual education campaign in June. This campaign will engage community partners to promote hepatitis B virus testing among Asian Americans and other populations experiencing health disparities related to
hepatitis B.


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CDC publishes study on human exposure to bats in Kentucky camp facilities 
CDC published Assessment of Risk for Exposure to Bats in Sleeping Quarters Before and During Remediation—Kentucky, 2012 in the May 17 issue of MMWR (pages 382-384). This report describes a study that CDC and the Kentucky Department for Public Health conducted to assess human exposure to bats occurring at a number of summer camps and other facilities located in eastern Kentucky in 2012. The first paragraph of the editorial note is reprinted below.        

Rabies is an acute, progressive, and fatal encephalitis transmitted to humans by a bite from a rabid animal or infectious saliva or neural tissue that comes in direct contact with open wounds or mucous membranes. Since 2002, the source of infection for 21 of 24 domestic human rabies cases was determined to be a bat. In 2011, 7% of bats tested in Kentucky were positive for rabies virus. Rabies PEP is recommended for anyone who has been bitten or scratched by a bat (if the bat is unavailable for testing). In addition, thorough risk assessment should be conducted and PEP considered in situations where a bat is identified in direct proximity to a person who cannot be reasonably sure a bat bite or scratch did not occur, such as someone awaking in a room with a bat or having a condition that might decrease awareness of a bat contact. Bat bites and scratches typically are not severe, and history of a known bite was not elicited in approximately half of the reported cases of human rabies attributable to bats. Bites or scratches from animals should be washed with soap and water immediately, and consultation should be sought with a health-care provider or local health department for any potential exposure to bats.

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About IAC Express
The Immunization Action Coalition welcomes redistribution of this issue of IAC Express or selected articles. When you do so, please add a note that the Immunization Action Coalition is the source of the material and provide a link to this issue.
If you have trouble receiving or displaying IAC Express messages, visit our online help section.
IAC Express is supported in part by Grant No. U38IP000589 from the National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases, CDC. Its contents are solely the responsibility of IAC and do not necessarily represent the official views of CDC. IAC Express is also supported by educational grants from the following companies: CSL Biotherapies; GlaxoSmithKline; MedImmune, Inc.; Merck Sharp & Dohme Corp.; Novartis Vaccines; Ortho Clinical Diagnostics, Inc.; Pfizer, Inc.; and sanofi pasteur.
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ISSN: 1526-1786

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Issue Abbreviations
AAFP, American Academy of Family Physicians; AAP, American Academy of Pediatrics; ACIP, Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices; AMA, American Medical Association; CDC, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention; FDA, Food and Drug Administration; IAC, Immunization Action Coalition; MMWR, Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report; NCIRD, National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases; NIVS, National Influenza Vaccine Summit; VIS, Vaccine Information Statement; VPD, vaccine-preventable disease; WHO, World Health Organization.
Publication Staff
Editor: Deborah L. Wexler, MD
Managing Editor: Dale Thompson, MA
Associate Editor: Teresa Anderson, DDS, MPH
Editorial Assistant: Janelle Tangonan Anderson
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This page was reviewed on May 21, 2013
 
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This website is supported in part by a cooperative agreement from the National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases (Grant No. 5U38IP000290) at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in Atlanta, GA. The website content is the sole responsibility of IAC and does not necessarily represent the official views of CDC.