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Issue 1013
IAC Express: Weekly immunization news and information
IAC Express 1013: September 4, 2012

TOP STORIES

IAC HANDOUTS

FEATURED RESOURCES

JOURNAL ARTICLES AND NEWSLETTERS



TOP STORIES

Reminder: August 2012 issues of Needle Tips and Vaccinate Adults available online
The August 2012 issues of Needle Tips and Vaccinate Adults are available online. Vaccinate Adults is an abbreviated version of Needle Tips with the pediatric content removed.

Click on the images below to download the entire August 2012 issues (PDF) of Needle Tips and/or Vaccinate Adults.

Download August 2012 issue of Needle TipsDownload August 2012 issue of Vaccinate Adults

Needle Tips: View the table of contents, magazine viewer, and back issues

Vaccinate Adults: View the table of contents, magazine viewer, and back issues

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CDC publishes report on 2011 national and state vaccination coverage among adolescents age 13–17 
CDC published National and State Vaccination Coverage Among Adolescents Aged 13–17 Years—United States, 2011 in the August 31 issue of MMWR (pages 671–677). The report includes information on vaccination coverage by age (Table 1); race, ethnicity, and poverty status (Table 2), and state and area (Table 3). A summary of data presented in the article (taken from a box on page 672) is reprinted below. 

Since 2006, vaccination coverage with routinely recommended vaccines among U.S. adolescents has increased; but coverage with vaccines recommended at 11 or 12 years of age still remains below target levels, especially for human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine.

From 2010 to 2011, vaccination coverage among U.S. adolescents increased for ≥1 dose of tetanus, diphtheria, acellular pertussis (Tdap) vaccine to 78.2%, ≥1 dose of meningococcal conjugate (MenACWY) vaccine to 70.5%, and ≥1 dose and ≥3 doses of HPV vaccine among females to 53.0% and 34.8%, respectively. The increase in HPV 1-dose coverage among females (4.3 percentage points) was half the increase in Tdap and MenACWY vaccination 7.8–9.5 percentage points) for the third consecutive year.

Although coverage with routine adolescent vaccines is increasing, the increase in HPV coverage among adolescent females is lagging, with only one half initiating the HPV series and the proportion of adolescent females protected from HPV-related cancers by the complete series ranging by state from 56.8% to as low as 15.5%. Stronger health-care provider recommendations for HPV vaccination, implementation of reminder/recall systems, elimination of missed opportunities for vaccination, and education of parents of adolescents regarding the risk for HPV infection and the benefits of vaccination are needed to protect adolescents from HPV-related cancers.


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CDC to expand efforts to promote HPV vaccination to physicians, teens, and parents
Given that HPV vaccination coverage among adolescent females is lagging behind coverage of other vaccinations recommended for adolescents, CDC is initiating measures to energetically promote HPV vaccination. In a letter dated August 30, NCIRD Director Dr. Anne Schuchat informs CDC grantees and partners that "business as usual" is not achieving the rate of vaccination needed to realize "the prospect of preventing most cervical cancer in an entire generation of women." Dr. Schuchat writes that urgent collective action is needed and outlines steps CDC is taking to explore new partnerships to increase the reach of CDC's message to physician and other audiences.

Dr. Schuchat concludes by encouraging CDC grantees and partners to be part of the effort to increase HPV vaccination and directs readers to several new tools they can use to "respond to this call to action." IAC Express readers will find links to some of the tools listed below.
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CDC reports nation's first influenza H3N2v-associated death, as well as more cases and hospitalizations
On August 31, CDC posted CDC Reports More Cases, Hospitalizations and Nation’s First H3N2v-Associated Death. Portions of it are reprinted below.

Today, CDC is reporting 12 additional cases of H3N2 variant virus (H3N2v) infection, as well as the first H3N2v-associated death, which was reported by the state of Ohio. The death occurred in an older adult with multiple underlying health conditions who reportedly had direct exposure to pigs in a fair setting. While limited person-to-person spread of this virus has been detected and likely continues to occur sporadically, no sustained community transmission has been found. CDC is monitoring this situation and working with states to respond to these evolving outbreaks. The agency continues to urge people at high risk from serious flu complications to stay away from pigs and pig arenas at fairs this summer. . . .

The 12 new cases reported this week are from the states of Minnesota (1), Ohio (3), Pennsylvania (1), and Wisconsin (7). Cumulative totals for 2011 and 2012 by state are available in the H3N2v case count table.

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Study indicates children with neurologic disorders have high risk of death from influenza
On August 29, CDC issued a press release titled Children with neurologic disorders at high risk of death from flu: Health care and advocacy groups join to protect children most vulnerable to influenza. Portions of the press release are reprinted below.

A disproportionately high number of children with neurologic disorders died from influenza-related complications during the 2009 H1N1 pandemic, according to a study by scientists with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The report in the journal Pediatrics underscores the importance of influenza vaccination to protect children with neurologic disorders. CDC is joining with the American Academy of Pediatrics, Families Fighting Flu, and Family Voices to spread the message about the importance of influenza vaccination and treatment in these children.  .  . .

Of the 336 children (defined as people younger than 18 years) with information available on underlying medical conditions who were reported to have died from 2009 H1N1 flu-associated causes, 227 had one or more underlying health conditions. One hundred forty-six children (64 percent) had a neurologic disorder such as cerebral palsy, intellectual disability, or epilepsy. Of the children with neurologic disorders for whom information on vaccination status was available, only 21 (23 percent) had received the seasonal influenza vaccine and 2 (3 percent) were fully vaccinated for 2009 H1N1.


Related links
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Spotlight on immunize.org: five more healthcare organizations join IAC's Honor Roll for Patient Safety
IAC urges qualifying healthcare organizations to apply for its Honor Roll for Patient Safety. The honor roll recognizes hospitals, medical practices, professional organizations, and government entities that have taken a stand for patient safety by implementing mandatory influenza vaccination policies for healthcare workers. More than 200 organizations are now enrolled.

Since August 7, when IAC Express last reported on the Honor Roll for Patient Safety, the following five healthcare organizations have been enrolled.

Newly added healthcare organizations
Banner Health (multistate): Phoenix and Page, AZ; Fairbanks, AK; Susanville, CA; Greeley, Brush, Sterling, and Loveland, CO; Ogallala, NE; Fallon, NV; Torrington, Wheatland, and Worland, WY; Adventist HealthCare, Rockville, MD; Adventist Home Health, Silver Spring, MD; Cytology Services of Maryland, Laurel, MD; and Shady Grove Adventist Hospital, Rockville, MD.

Related links
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HealthMap Vaccine Finder directs users to nearby locations that give influenza vaccinations
The web-based Google “Flu Finder” program, previously used to promote nationwide influenza vaccination locations, is no longer available. The public can now find influenza vaccination clinics, pharmacies, other influenza vaccination venues by using the free, online HealthMap Vaccine Finder.

This year, the Vaccine Finder is expanding to cover all four types of influenza vaccine: intramuscular, intradermal, nasal spray, and high dose.

Influenza vaccination providers who want to list their clinic, pharmacy, health department, or other venue with HealthMap Vaccine Finder can sign up using an online form.

Contact the HealthMap team at vaccine@healthmap.org with questions regarding this program.

An exciting development is on the horizon: the Vaccine Finder will expand later this year to allow users to search for nearby vaccination providers of 10 adult vaccines, including hepatitis A, hepatitis B, HPV, MMR, meningococcal, pneumococcal, Td, Tdap, varicella, and zoster.

HealthMap is a team of researchers, epidemiologists, and software developers at Children's Hospital Boston.

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IAC HANDOUTS

IAC updates "Screening Questionnaire for Inactivated Injectable Influenza Vaccination" and "Screening Questionnaire for Live Attenuated Intranasal Influenza Vaccination"
IAC recently updated the information on egg allergy on page 2 of its Screening Questionnaire for Inactivated Injectable Influenza Vaccination (TIV) and Screening Questionnaire for Live Attenuated Intranasal Influenza Vaccination (LAIV). Page 2 of each questionnaire gives healthcare professionals background information about the questions asked on page 1 of the questionnaires.

IAC's Handouts for Patients and Staff web section offers healthcare professionals and the public more than 250 FREE English-language handouts (many also available in translation), which we encourage website users to print out, copy, and distribute widely.

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IAC updates "Guides for determining the number of doses of influenza vaccine to give to children ages 6 months through 8 years during the 2012–2013 influenza season"
IAC recently revised its Guides for determining the number of doses of influenza vaccine to give to children ages 6 months through 8 years during the 2012–2013 influenza season, based on information in CDC's influenza recommendations for the 2012–13 influenza season.

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IAC updates "Standing Orders for Administering Influenza Vaccine to Adults" and "Standing Orders for Administering Influenza Vaccines to Children and Adolescents"
IAC recently revised information on egg allergy in its Standing Orders for Administering Influenza Vaccine to Adults and Standing Orders for Administering Influenza Vaccines to Children and Adolescents. In addition, information on which children need two doses of 2012–13 influenza vaccine was added to the influenza standing orders for children and adolescents.

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IAC updates "Influenza Vaccine Products for the 2012–2013 Influenza Season"
IAC recently revised its Influenza Vaccine Products for the 2012–2013 Influenza Season by adding information about Agriflu (TIV; Novartis Vaccines). The piece was also reformatted and retitled. Previously, the title was "Influenza Vaccine Products for the 2011–2012 Influenza Season"

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FEATURED RESOURCES

FDA posts guidance on storing and using temperature-sensitive biological products during severe weather
On August 30, FDA posted Impact of Severe Weather Conditions on Biological Products. The document includes information on vaccines that require refrigeration or frozen storage. Guidance is given for these situations:
  • When power goes out
  • When power is restored
  • If flooding is expected
  • If flooding occurs
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JOURNAL ARTICLES AND NEWSLETTERS

CDC publishes report on measles outbreaks and transmission in the Horn of Africa during 2010–11
CDC published Measles—Horn of Africa, 2010–2011 in the August 31 issue of MMWR (pages 678–684). A press summary of the article is reprinted below.

Severe drought, famine, war, large-scale population movements, and overcrowded refugee camps led to a complex emergency in the Horn of Africa during 2010–2011. A large measles outbreak occurred in Somalia, and large influxes of refugees from southern and central areas of Somalia into camps in Kenya and Ethiopia near the Somalia borders led to measles virus transmission among refugees and to outbreaks in Ethiopia and Kenya. To prevent large measles outbreaks and ultimately reach measles elimination, vaccination strategies must be implemented to achieve and maintain uniformly high 2-dose measles vaccination coverage to reach the 93 percent–95 percent population immunity threshold that can provide herd immunity in refugee settings and in all countries.

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2011 National Immunization Survey included households with only cell phone service
CDC published Announcement: Addition of Households with Only Cellular Telephone Service to the National Immunization Survey, 2011 in the August 31 issue of MMWR (page 685). A portion of the article is reprinted below.

Beginning in 2011, the NIS sampling frame was expanded from a single landline frame to dual landline and cellular telephone sampling frames. This change increased the representativeness of the sample characteristics but had little effect on the final 2011 NIS and NIS-Teen national estimates of vaccination coverage overall and when stratified by poverty status.

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About IAC Express 
The Immunization Action Coalition welcomes redistribution of this issue of IAC Express or selected articles. When you do so, please add a note that the Immunization Action Coalition is the source of the material and provide a link to this issue.
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IAC Express is supported in part by Grant No. U38IP000589 from the National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases, CDC. Its contents are solely the responsibility of IAC and do not necessarily represent the official views of CDC. IAC Express is also supported by educational grants from the following companies: Baxter Healthcare Corp.; CSL Biotherapies; GlaxoSmithKline; MedImmune, Inc.; Merck Sharp & Dohme Corp.; Novartis Vaccines; Ortho Clinical Diagnostics, Inc.; Pfizer, Inc.; and sanofi pasteur.
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Video: As Whooping Cough Rebounds in U.S., Infants at Risk
As Whooping Cough Rebounds in U.S., Infants at Risk: As the worst whooping cough outbreak in more than half a century grips the U.S., health officials are saying that most adults and teens are woefully under-vaccinated. This video from PBSNewsHour explores what's behind the resurgence and its potential consequence for those who can't be vaccinated: newborns.
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Issue Abbreviations
AAFP, American Academy of Family Physicians; AAP, American Academy of Pediatrics; ACIP, Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices; AMA, American Medical Association; CDC, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention; FDA, Food and Drug Administration; IAC, Immunization Action Coalition; MMWR, Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report; NCIRD, National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases; NIVS, National Influenza Vaccine Summit; VIS, Vaccine Information Statement; VPD, vaccine-preventable disease; WHO, World Health Organization.
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Editor: Deborah L. Wexler, MD
Managing Editor: Dale Thompson, MA
Associate Editor: Teresa Anderson, DDS, MPH
Editorial Assistant: Janelle Tangonan Anderson
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This page was reviewed on September 4, 2012
 
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This website is supported in part by a cooperative agreement from the National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases (Grant No. 5U38IP000290) at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in Atlanta, GA. The website content is the sole responsibility of IAC and does not necessarily represent the official views of CDC.