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Issue 1,620: March 9, 2022
(Formerly IAC Express)
Top Stories
 
Immunize.org Pages and Handouts
 
Vaccine Information Statements
 
Featured Resources
 
Notable Publications
 
Global News
 
Upcoming Events
 
Top Stories

New! Keep up to date using Immunize.org’s new “Checklist of Current Versions of U.S. COVID-19 Vaccination Guidance and Clinic Support Tools” and updated COVID-19 main page.

It is challenging to keep up with changes to COVID-19 vaccine guidance and the numerous fact sheets and job aids available to help you deliver COVID-19 vaccinations as recommended. To address this, Immunize.org has published a new 2-page job aid, Checklist of Current Versions of U.S. COVID-19 Vaccination Guidance and Clinic Support Tools. The checklist includes the most recent revision dates of CDC’s primary COVID-19 vaccination websites, as well as print-ready PDF documents from CDC and FDA: each date is hyperlinked to the original document or web page. Immunize.org will update this list at least monthly, indicating when it was last updated prominently at the top of the page. We encourage COVID-19 vaccination providers to review this list monthly to be sure your practices stay up to date.
 
     

In addition, Immunize.org has updated its Vaccines: COVID-19 main page, which provides a comprehensive index to key resources from CDC, Immunize.org, and other partners. This page facilitates access to information on COVID-19 vaccine products, clinic resources and tools, vaccine fact sheets, and other important vaccine-related topics. Links just added to this web page include the new checklist described above and CDC’s Interim COVID-19 Vaccine Immunization Schedule for Ages 5 Years and Older.

Related Links:
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Immunize.org "Ask the Experts: COVID-19" web page updated with newest CDC clinical considerations, including expanded dose intervals for mRNA vaccines

Immunize.org has published a thoroughly reviewed and updated version of its popular Ask the Experts: COVID-19 web page, current as of February 24. This extensive list of clinical questions and answers addresses COVID-19 recommendations and clinical considerations, including new CDC guidance issued in February. New and updated questions will address such issues as:
  • Who should wait 8 weeks between mRNA primary series doses?
  • What should we do with a patient who received a vaccine in a clinical trial if the vaccine is not yet in routine use anywhere in the world?
  • Is there no longer a waiting period after antibody treatment of COVID-19 infection before COVID-19 vaccination?
  • How long should someone wait after vaccination to receive an antibody infusion for pre-exposure prophylaxis?

Immunize.org's Ask the Experts main page leads you to 30 distinct web pages on a variety of topics with more than 1,100 common or challenging questions and answers (Q&As) about vaccines and their administration. Immunize.org's team of experts includes Kelly L. Moore, MD, MPH (team lead), Carolyn B. Bridges, MD, FACP, and Iyabode Beysolow, MD, MPH.

Related Links

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Preorder today! Laminated versions of CDC’s 2022 immunization schedules ship in mid-March.

Immunize.org’s laminated versions of the 2022 U.S. child and adolescent immunization schedule and the 2022 U.S. adult immunization schedule are available for preorder and will ship in mid-March.
 
While the schedules are available online from CDC at no cost, Immunize.org’s printed, laminated schedules are ideal for use in any busy healthcare setting where vaccinations are given. Their tough coating can be wiped down, and they’re durable enough to stand up to a year's worth of use.
 
In 2022, the length of each schedule with appendices was extended by two pages. As a result, the laminated schedules are now published in a standard 8.5” X 11” booklet format. The child/adolescent schedule is ten pages (i.e., five double-sided pages) and the booklet includes a bonus page with Immunize.org’s popular 1-page handout summarizing the dose, route, and needle size recommendations for all vaccines and recipients. The adult schedule booklet is eight pages (i.e., four double-sided pages).



With color coding for easy reading, our laminated schedules replicate the original CDC formatting, including the essential tables and notes.

PRICING

     Number of Copies      Cost 
1–4 copies      $7.50 each     
5–19 copies $5.50 each
20–99 copies $4.50 each
100–499 copies $4.00 each
 500–999 copies  $3.50 each

For quotes on customizing or placing orders of 1,000 copies or more, call 651-647-9009 or email admininfo@immunize.org.

Visit the Shop Immunize.org: Laminated Schedules web page for more information on the schedules, to view images of all the pages, to download the order form, and to order today!

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March is Women’s History Month; Immunize.org celebrates the many contributions of women in vaccinology

March is Women's History Month and Immunize.org would like to recognize the contributions of women to vaccinology since its earliest days. In recent decades, many women have made major contributions to vaccine science and vaccination programs globally. You may be unfamiliar with some of these early trailblazers in the history of vaccinology 50 or more years ago, including:

  • Lady Mary Wortley Montagu introduced smallpox inoculation into Western medicine in 1721
  • Anna Wessels Williams isolated the reference strain of diphtheria used to develop the first diphtheria antitoxin and later a diphtheria toxoid in the 1890s. She developed a quick test to diagnose rabies in 1902.
  • Margaret Pittman recognized in 1931 that type b of Haemophilus influenzae was a major cause of disease
  • Ida A. Bengtson developed the complement fixation test in the 1920s, which was used to standardize units of biological activity for botulinum, gas gangrene, and other antitoxins
  • Pearl L. Kendrick and Grace Elderling researched pertussis in the 1940s, tested their vaccine first on themselves, and ran a successful clinical trial, resulting in the first vaccine against pertussis. Loney Clinton Gordon aided their efforts.
  • Dorothy Horstmann showed that poliovirus reaches the brain through the blood in the 1940s
  • Clara I. Nigg codeveloped botulinum toxoids in 1947
  • Isabel M. Morgan and her team were the first to prove that inactivated viruses could produce immunity in the 1940s; her work led the development of Salk's polio vaccine in 1955
  • Brigitte Alice Askonas's work on antibodies and T-cells in the 1950s informed research to improve vaccines
  • Margaret G. Smith isolated cytomegalovirus (CMV) in 1956
  • Ruth L. Kirshstein helped develop and refine tests to assure the safety of viral vaccines for such diseases as polio, measles, and rubella in the 1950s–1970s


The contributions of all of the women who work tirelessly around the world to advance vaccine science, policy, and program implementation are deeply appreciated.  
 
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Influenza activity remains sporadic, even increasing in some areas; keep vaccinating if it is in your community

Influenza Surveillance
For week 8, ending on February 26, CDC's Weekly U.S. Influenza Surveillance Report, FluView summary reports that seasonal influenza activity in the United States continues in parts of the country and is increasing in some areas, varying from community to community. 



Influenza Vaccination Dashboard
CDC's new Weekly Flu Vaccination Dashboard shares preliminary vaccination data. This week’s key fact: Influenza vaccination coverage among adults age 18–49 years varies widely among the states and DC as of mid-January 2022, ranging from just 31.4% to a high of 59.0%; overall, national vaccination coverage is 44.3%.

CDC recommends everyone age 6 months and older get an annual influenza vaccine. Influenza and COVID-19 vaccines may be given at the same visit, if needed. COVID-19 vaccination alone provides no protection from influenza or any other respiratory virus. 

Vaccine Finder
If you don’t provide influenza vaccine at your site, please strongly recommend vaccination and refer people to sites that do vaccinate. Use VaccineFinder, a user-friendly website to help people of all ages find influenza, COVID-19, and other vaccines. Participating providers can update their vaccine inventory estimates on VaccineFinder. For questions or more information, contact vaccine@healthmap.org.

Related Links

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Spotlight: Review of resources at Immunize.org focused on the history of vaccines   

In this week's Spotlight, we summarize resources at Immunize.org that focus on the history of vaccines.

Our Vaccine Timeline main page lists historic dates and events related to vaccines and immunization. From Edward Jenner's first smallpox vaccination in 1796 to COVID-19 vaccines, this chart highlights scientific discoveries and technologies that led to rapid advances in virology, molecular biology, and vaccinology.

Our YouTube channel containing public service announcements (PSAs) encouraging vaccination, compiled by vaccine expert Capt. William L. Atkinson, MD, MPH, USPHS (retired), is a collection that spans more than 50 years.

Our Video of the Week series ran from January 2009 through May 2021. The collection of more than 600 videos selected by Immunize.org staff began when it was difficult to find quality video on the Internet. The archived collection offers a glimpse into important topics of those days.

Our History through Film main page overviews the Protecting Health: Saving Lives documentary, which covers the history of the Immunization Action Coalition from 1990 to 2020. Hosted by Sam Waterston, the 30-minute film was produced by Visionaries, Inc. for broadcast during its 24th season on more than 100 local PBS stations nationwide.

Our Publications Archive links to past issues of various Immunize.org publications, describing the contemporary vaccine-practice issues of the time: Needle Tips, Vaccinate Adults, Vaccinate Women, and IZ Express (and its IAC Express predecessor).

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Journalists interview Immunize.org experts

Journalists seek out Immunize.org experts to help explain vaccines to the public and policy makers. We help the media understand and communicate the complex work vaccinators do. Here is one of our recent citations.

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Vaccines in the news

These recent articles convey the potential risks of vaccine-preventable diseases and the importance of vaccination.

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Immunize.org Pages and Handouts

Recap: These updated Immunize.org educational materials and web pages for clinicians were released during January and February

IZ Express regularly provides readers with information about Immunize.org's new and updated educational materials and web pages for healthcare professionals. All Immunize.org materials are free to distribute.

In case you missed them during recent weeks, updates were made to these helpful materials:

Immunize.org Updated Materials for Clinicians and Patients

Immunize.org Updated Web Pages Related Links
  • Immunize.org: Handouts main page to see educational materials sorted by category
  • Immunize.org: Ask the Experts main page to access more than 1,100 questions answered by Immunize.org experts
  • Immunize.org: Clinic Tools main page and its nine subtopics
  • Immunize.org: Educational Materials for Patients and Staff—an alphabetical list of more than 230 ready-to-print staff educational materials and patient handouts
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Vaccine Information Statements

Recap: These new VISs and VIS translations were released during January and February

IZ Express regularly provides readers with information about Vaccine Information Statements (VISs) and translations of VISs. 

On February 4, 2022, CDC released updated pneumococcal conjugate (PCV) vaccine and recombinant zoster (shingles) vaccine VISs.

During January and February, updated VIS translations were posted in:

Additionally, two Immunize.org handouts related to VISs were updated: Related Links
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Featured Resources

65+ Flu Defense website offers resources for healthcare professionals serving older adults

Confident recommendations for influenza vaccine from healthcare providers are powerfully persuasive. To assist you in maximizing protection for your patients, Immunize.org, in collaboration with Seqirus, has updated the 65+ Flu Defense website at www.influenza-defense.org.

A new fact sheet on the site, The Importance of Preventing Influenza during a Pandemic, offers responses to help guide discussions with patients on the increased importance of flu vaccination during the COVID-19 pandemic. Age increases risks associated with COVID-19 infection including hospitalization and death. Preliminary studies suggest coinfection with influenza B and SARS-CoV-2 may elevate the risk of poor outcomes.



This helpful site includes information, tools, and tips for communicating with these adults about the scope and severity of influenza. Resources include:

Check out the updated 65+ Flu Defense website at www.influenza-defense.org to assist your efforts in protecting this vulnerable population.

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Notable Publications

“Safety Monitoring of COVID-19 Vaccine Booster Doses among Persons Aged 12–17 Years—United States, December 9, 2021–February 20, 2022” published as an MMWR Early Release

CDC published Safety Monitoring of COVID-19 Vaccine Booster Doses among Persons Aged 12–17 Years—United States, December 9, 2021–February 20, 2022 on March 4 as an MMWR Early Release. A portion of the summary appears below. 

Adults aged ≥18 years reported adverse reactions less frequently after receipt of a homologous Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 booster dose than after the second primary dose.…

Among persons aged 12–17 years, reactions after Pfizer-BioNTech booster vaccination were generally mild to moderate and transient; the frequency of local and systemic reactions reported to v-safe after a booster dose were equal to or slightly higher than after the second primary dose. Myocarditis was less frequently reported after a booster dose than a second primary dose.…

Health care providers, parents, and adolescents should be advised that local and systemic reactions are expected among adolescents after a homologous Pfizer-BioNTech booster vaccination and that serious adverse events are rare.

Access the MMWR Early Release article in HTML or PDF.

Related Link

  • MMWR's main page provides access to MMWR Weekly and its companion publications
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“Effectiveness of COVID-19 Pfizer-BioNTech BNT162b2 mRNA Vaccination in Preventing COVID-19–Associated Emergency Department and Urgent Care Encounters and Hospitalizations among Nonimmunocompromised Children and Adolescents Aged 5–17 Years—VISION Network, 10 States, April 2021–January 2022” published as an MMWR Early Release

CDC published Effectiveness of COVID-19 Pfizer-BioNTech BNT162b2 mRNA Vaccination in Preventing COVID-19–Associated Emergency Department and Urgent Care Encounters and Hospitalizations among Nonimmunocompromised Children and Adolescents Aged 5–17 Years—VISION Network, 10 States, April 2021–January 2022 on March 4 as an MMWR Early Release. A portion of the summary appears below. 

Two doses of Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine provided protection against COVID-19 in persons aged 12–17 years during Delta predominance, but data during Omicron predominance and among children aged 5–11 years are lacking.…

Two doses protect against COVID-19–associated emergency department and urgent care encounters among children and adolescents. However, vaccine effectiveness (VE) was lower during Omicron predominance and decreased with time since vaccination; a booster dose restored VE to 81% among adolescents aged 16–17 years. Overall, 2-dose VE against COVID-19–associated hospitalization was 73%–94%.…

All eligible children and adolescents should remain up to date with recommended COVID-19 vaccinations, including a booster dose for those aged 12–17 years.

Access the MMWR Early Release article in HTML or PDF.

Related Link

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“Disparities in COVID-19 Vaccination Coverage between Urban and Rural Counties—United States, December 14, 2020–January 31, 2022” published in MMWR

CDC published Disparities in COVID-19 Vaccination Coverage between Urban and Rural Counties—United States, December 14, 2020–January 31, 2022 on March 4 in MMWR. A portion of the summary appears below.

COVID-19 incidence and mortality are higher in rural than in urban communities. Disparities in COVID-19 vaccination coverage between urban and rural communities have been recognized.…

COVID-19 vaccination coverage with the first dose of the primary vaccination series was lower in rural (58.5%) than in urban counties (75.4%); disparities have increased more than twofold since April 2021. Receipt of booster or additional doses was similarly low in both rural and urban counties.…

Addressing barriers to vaccination in rural areas is critical to achieving vaccine equity, reducing disparities, and decreasing COVID-19–related illness and death in the United States.



Access the MMWR article in HTML or PDF.

Related Link

  • MMWR's main page provides access to MMWR Weekly and its companion publications
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Global News

“Readiness for Use of Type 2 Novel Oral Poliovirus Vaccine in Response to a Type 2 Circulating Vaccine-Derived Poliovirus Outbreak—Tajikistan, 2020–2021” published in MMWR

CDC published Readiness for Use of Type 2 Novel Oral Poliovirus Vaccine in Response to a Type 2 Circulating Vaccine-Derived Poliovirus Outbreak—Tajikistan, 2020–2021 on March 4 in MMWR. A summary appears below.

In the summer of 2021, a circulating vaccine-derived poliovirus type 2 (cVDPV2) outbreak in Tajikistan was stopped by achieving high coverage with three rounds of novel oral poliovirus vaccine type 2 (nOPV2), the first use of nOPV2 outside of the African Region. Following the identification of local transmission of circulating cVDPV2 in early 2021, Tajikistan began readiness activities to obtain verification for use of nOPV2. Following verification, in the first use of outside of the African Region, nOPV2 was administered during 3 high-quality vaccination campaigns to children aged 0–65 months in June, July and September 2021. A total of 31 cVDPV2 cases were confirmed during the outbreak with the latest onset on June 26, 2021. The Tajik Ministry of Health and Social Protection of the Population reported administrative vaccination coverage >99%. Polio is a Public Health Emergency of International Concern under the International Health Regulations, and any poliovirus identification requires immediate reporting and prompt response.

Access the MMWR article in HTML or PDF.

Related Link

  • MMWR's main page provides access to MMWR Weekly and its companion publications
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Upcoming Events

Virtual: Hepatitis Appropriations Partnership hosts first session of "2022 Viral Hepatitis Policy and Advocacy Summit" on March 17

The Hepatitis Appropriations Partnership will hold the first of four sessions in the "2022 Viral Hepatitis Policy and Advocacy Summit" titled Health Equity and Hepatitis at 3:00 p.m. (ET) on March 17. This session will feature a discussion around the intersections of stigma, racism, and access to viral hepatitis services from a community and federal perspective.

Register for part one: Health Equity and Hepatitis.

Additional upcoming conversations in the four-part series include:

  • Hepatitis and Maternal/Child Health – March 24
  • Overdose and Hepatitis – week of March 28
  • Federal Leadership and Congressional Advocacy – week of April 4
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Virtual: GSK hosts “Vaccine Virtual Days 2022” event on March 30 and 31

GlaxoSmithKline Pharmaceuticals (GSK) will host Vaccine Virtual Days 2022 on March 30–31. This is a 2-day event is designed to provide education and exchange of knowledge on relevant topics around vaccination. An independent scientific committee, including Immunize.org’s Dr. L.J Tan, has selected speakers who are leading vaccinology experts from around the world. The program will be offered live and on-demand, including a panel discussion and Q&A. There is no fee to attend. 

View the agenda hereRegister for the event

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Virtual: Registration open for “27th Annual Massachusetts Adult Immunization Conference” on April 5; CE available

The Massachusetts Adult Immunization Coalition (MAIC) will host its 27th Annual Massachusetts Adult Immunization Conference from 8:00 a.m.–3:45 p.m. (ET) on April 5. This year's conference theme, "2022: Trials, Transitions, & Triumphs," recognizes the difficulties encountered when vaccinating adults during the COVID-19 pandemic, acknowledges the adaptations adult vaccine providers have made, and celebrates all that has been accomplished since the pandemic's early days. The overall goal is to educate healthcare professionals on current best practices for adult immunizations. The 2022 conference offers an opportunity to receive the most updated information on routine adult immunization from leading experts in the field, and network with immunization experts and colleagues.  

The Bureau of Infectious Disease and Laboratory Sciences, Massachusetts Department of Public Health, designates this live activity for a maximum of 6.25 AMA PRA Category 1 Credits.

There is a $75 fee to attend.

View the agenda hereRegister for the event.

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Virtual: NFID hosts "2022 Online Annual Conference on Vaccinology Research" on April 11–12; fee to attend, CME available

The National Foundation for Infectious Diseases (NFID) will host the 2022 Online Annual Conference on Vaccinology Research on April 11–12. The conference will include engaging presentations and panel discussions from world-renowned vaccinology experts discussing the latest developments in vaccinology research and the long-lasting impacts of COVID-19.

There is a $300 fee to attend. NFID designates this live activity for a maximum of 4.75 AMA PRA Category 1 Credits.

View the detailed agenda.  Register for the conference
 
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For more upcoming events, visit our Calendar of Events.
About IZ Express
Immunize.org welcomes redistribution of this issue of IZ Express or selected articles. When you do so, please add a note that Immunize.org is the source of the material and provide a link to this issue.

IZ Express is supported in part by Grant No. 1NH23IP922654 from the National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases, CDC. Its contents are solely the responsibility of Immunize.org and do not necessarily represent the official views of CDC.

IZ Express Disclaimer
ISSN 2771-8085

About IZ Express

IZ Express is supported in part by Grant No. 1NH23IP922654 from CDC’s National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases. Its contents are solely the responsibility of Immunize.org and do not necessarily represent the official views of CDC.

IZ Express Disclaimer
ISSN 2771-8085

Editorial Information

  • Editor-in-Chief
    Kelly L. Moore, MD, MPH
  • Managing Editor
    John D. Grabenstein, RPh, PhD
  • Associate Editor
    Sharon G. Humiston, MD, MPH
  • Writer/Publication Coordinator
    Taryn Chapman, MS
    Courtnay Londo, MA
  • Style and Copy Editor
    Marian Deegan, JD
  • Web Edition Managers
    Arkady Shakhnovich
    Jermaine Royes
  • Contributing Writer
    Laurel H. Wood, MPA
  • Technical Reviewer
    Kayla Ohlde

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