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Issue 1,567: May 19, 2021
Top Stories


Featured Resources


Education and Training


Conferences and Meetings


Immunization PSAs from the Archive

 


Top Stories


"The Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices’ Interim Recommendation for Use of Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 Vaccine in Adolescents Aged 12–15 Years—United States, May 2021" published in MMWR Early Release
 

CDC published The Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices’ Interim Recommendation for Use of Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 Vaccine in Adolescents Aged 12–15 Years—United States, May 2021 in the May 14 issue of MMWR Early Release. A portion of the summary appears below.

...On May 10, 2021, the Food and Drug Administration expanded Emergency Use Authorization for the Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine to include adolescents aged 12–15 years....

...On May 12, 2021, after a systematic review of all available data, the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices made an interim recommendation for use of the Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine in adolescents aged 12–15 years for the prevention of COVID-19....

...The Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine is the first COVID-19 vaccine approved for use in adolescents and has high efficacy against symptomatic COVID-19. Vaccination will be important to protect adolescents against symptomatic COVID-19 disease and to reduce community transmission of SARS-CoV-2.

Access the MMWR article in HTML format or in PDF format.

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CDC updates its clinical considerations for use of COVID-19 vaccines currently authorized in the United States

CDC updated its Interim Clinical Considerations for Use of COVID-19 Vaccines Currently Authorized in the United States. COVID-19 vaccination is now recommended for all people 12 years and older for the prevention of COVID-19 in the United States.

The Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) has issued interim recommendations for the use of:

  • Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 Vaccine (age 12–15 years and age ≥16 years)
  • Moderna COVID-19 Vaccine (age ≥18 years)
  • Janssen COVID-19 Vaccine (Johnson & Johnson) (age ≥18 years)

These clinical considerations provide additional information to healthcare providers and public health officials on the use of COVID-19 vaccines.

Additional recent changes to the Clinical Considerations web page include:
  • Updated information for authorized age groups to include vaccination of adolescents age 12–15 years with Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 Vaccine
  • Updated information on coadministration of COVID-19 vaccines with other vaccines
  • A new section on persons with a history of multisystem inflammatory syndrome added to considerations for vaccination of people with certain underlying medical conditions
  • Updated recommendation for timing of COVID-19 vaccine administration in persons with a history of heparin-induced thrombocytopenia
  • Updated information on vaccination of children and adolescents

View CDC's Interim Clinical Considerations for Use of mRNA COVID-19 Vaccines Currently Authorized in the United States.

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IAC summarizes May 12 ACIP emergency meeting on COVID-19 vaccine: recommendations expanded to age 12 and older and safety data reviewed 
 

On May 12, the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) met to review data on the use of Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 Vaccine in individuals age 12–15 years, as well as to hear updates on other COVID-19 vaccine issues. This emergency meeting was called in response to the FDA’s issuance (on May 10) of an expanded Emergency Use Authorization (EUA) allowing use of the Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 Vaccine in this age group. In a 14-0 vote (with one abstention), ACIP voted to recommend use of the vaccine as described in the EUA.

Rationale for the recommendation – In reaching this decision, ACIP reviewed the results of the COVID-19 vaccine clinical trial in adolescents age 12–15 years. Using its Evidence to Recommendation (EtR) framework, ACIP considered these data within the context of COVID-19 disease epidemiology among adolescents. Adolescents are at risk of severe illness from COVID-19, with more than 1.5 million reported cases and 13,000 hospitalizations to date. In April, adolescents accounted for approximately 9% of all reported cases in the U.S., which was higher than the percentage reported for adults age 65 and older. Approximately 1.3% of adolescent deaths from January–April 2021 were due to COVID-19, which, during 2019, would have ranked within the top 10 causes of death for adolescents. In addition, the clinical presentation of multi-system inflammatory syndrome in children (MIS-C) is more severe in adolescents than younger children. Adolescents also transmit SARS-CoV-2 to others. In a clinical trial of 2,260 participants, the Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 Vaccine demonstrated 100% efficacy against symptomatic, laboratory-confirmed COVID-19. Local and systemic reactions were comparable to those seen in adults, and no serious adverse events (including anaphylaxis and Bell’s palsy or facial paralysis) were reported in vaccine recipients.
 
Vaccine coadministration – As part of its review of clinical considerations for COVID-19 vaccine, CDC is eliminating its prior recommendation that a minimum interval of 14 days be provided before and after administration of COVID-19 vaccine with any other vaccine. This decision to eliminate the minimum interval requirement around administration of COVID-19 vaccine applies to all persons age 12 and older. Substantial data has now been collected supporting the safety of COVID-19 vaccines, and extensive experience with other vaccines has demonstrated that immunogenicity and adverse event profiles are generally similar when vaccines are administered simultaneously as when administered alone. ACIP members requested that CDC add clarifying language indicating it was unknown whether reactogenicity was increased with coadministration of vaccines and that providers could consider the reactogenicity profile of the vaccines being given, as well as whether the patient is behind or at risk of becoming behind on recommended vaccines.
 
Additional updates – ACIP heard a presentation on the continued safety monitoring for thrombosis with thrombocytopenia syndrome (TTS) following administration of the Janssen COVID-19 Vaccine (Johnson & Johnson). The Committee also reviewed data demonstrating high effectiveness of the COVID-19 vaccines currently in use in the United States. Finally, CDC reported on its active surveillance for emerging SARS-CoV-2 variants, which could have broad implications for future vaccine policy decisions.
 
The next regularly scheduled ACIP meeting will be held June 23–24, 2021. Information about past and future ACIP meetings may be found on the ACIP website. 
 
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CDC releases new and updated resources to support COVID-19 vaccination 

On May 13, CDC released new and updated resources to support COVID-19 vaccination. Below is a summary of the resources, including links.  

Information for Parents and Adolescents 

  • New web pageCOVID-19 Vaccines for Children and Teens provides information about the benefits of COVID-19 vaccines for adolescents age 12 and older, how to find a vaccination provider for adolescents, and what to expect during and after vaccination 
  • New fact sheet: COVID-19 Vaccines for Preteens and Teens is a printable fact sheet for parents that explains the benefits of a COVID-19 vaccine for their children, safety information, and what to expect during and after vaccination 
  • New frequently asked questions: Two new FAQs have been posted to address questions about the safety and benefits of COVID-19 vaccination for adolescents age 12 and older 
  • New myth-buster about menstrual cycles: Your menstrual cycle cannot be affected by being near someone who received a COVID-19 vaccine. This question and answer explains why. 
  • Myth-buster about infertility: It is safe for people who would like to have a baby one day to get a COVID-19 vaccine. This question and answer explains why. 
  • Key things to know: The web pages Key Things to Know about COVID-19 Vaccines and About COVID-19 Vaccines have been updated to include the recommendation that adolescents age 12 and older get vaccinated 
  • Vaccine information for specific groups: The web page COVID-19 Vaccine Information for Specific Groups has been updated to help the public find information about vaccination for adolescents

Information for Healthcare and Vaccine Providers 

  • New pediatric toolkit: The Pediatric Healthcare Professionals COVID-19 Vaccination Toolkit provides materials to help healthcare providers give parents clear and accurate information about COVID-19 vaccines. The toolkit includes answers to common questions, an explanation of how mRNA vaccines work, and printable materials to give to parents. 
  • New FAQs about consent for minors: FAQs have been posted on the Pfizer-BioNTech product page for providers with information about consent, prescreening questions, and other issues related to the vaccination of minors 
  • New sample patient letter: Healthcare providers can customize and send this sample letter to encourage their patients to get a COVID-19 vaccine. It includes the new recommendation that everyone age 12 and up get a COVID-19 vaccination. 
  • Recipient education page: The Vaccine Recipient Education page has been updated to include resources about COVID-19 vaccination for adolescents 
  • Toolkit for community-based organizations: The Community-Based Organizations COVID-19 Vaccine Toolkit has been updated to include information and resources on COVID-19 vaccination for adolescents age 12 and older

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CDC recognizes the contributions of Dr. Nancy Messonnier during her 25-year career at CDC; Dr. Sam Posner now acting director, NCIRD

On May 10, CDC sent an important announcement to many CDC partners recognizing the contributions of Dr. Nancy Messonnier, who resigned from her position as Director of CDC’s National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases (NCIRD) in mid-May. 
 
Dr. Sam Posner is now Acting Director of NCIRD. A portion of a letter from Dr. Posner appears below. 
 
We honor and recognize the many tremendous public health contributions Dr. Messonnier has made during her 25-year career at CDC, many accomplished in concert with you—our critical partners. Dr. Messonnier’s work both in respiratory disease outbreaks and in promoting the importance of immunization across the lifespan helped prepare her for the challenge of COVID-19. 
 
Since the beginning of the pandemic, in collaboration with our partners across public health and the federal, state, tribal, local and territorial government, we achieved incredible things, including deploying multiple vaccines in under one year and building the information infrastructure to provide real-time vaccination coverage and vaccine safety data. Our public health and immunization partners worked to stand up brand new vaccination programs during the worst COVID-19 surge our country had experienced. These accomplishments have been critical to the control of the pandemic and will also serve the American people and public health well into the future. 
 
Dr. Messonnier’s work in public health will continue in her new role as Executive Director, Pandemics and Health Systems, with the Skoll Foundation. And our work to end the COVID-19 pandemic, return safely to normal activities and better prepare for the next health threat also continues. 

 
All of us at the Immunization Action Coalition thank Dr. Messonnier for her partnership and for her many years of service in protecting the health of the nation.

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New CDC COVID-19 vaccine effectiveness study in health workers shows mRNA vaccines are 94% effective

A new CDC study published as an Early Release MMWR shows that FDA-authorized COVID-19 mRNA vaccines reduced the risk getting sick with COVID-19 by 94% among fully vaccinated healthcare personnel (HCP). A portion of the press release appears below:

...Data for this assessment come from a network covering 500,000 HCP across 33 sites in 25 U.S. states, providing additional robust evidence that mRNA vaccines are effective against symptomatic illness in real-world conditions.

The assessment compared vaccination status of participants who tested positive for SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19 (cases) with vaccination status of those who tested negative (controls). Among the 1,843 participants, there were 623 cases and 1,220 controls. Vaccine effectiveness estimates were calculated by comparing the odds of COVID-19 vaccination in cases and controls....

...Understanding vaccine effectiveness among HCP is important because they are at higher risk for exposure to SARS-CoV-2 through patient interactions. Vaccination of HCP protects them and their patients against COVID-19 and ensures continuation of critical health care services.

The assessment found that COVID-19 symptomatic illness was reduced by 94% among HCP who were fully vaccinated, defined in this study as seven or more days after receipt of a second vaccine dose, and by 82% among those who were partially vaccinated, defined in this study as 14 days after receipt of dose one through six days after dose two. These findings support CDC’s recommendation that everyone should get both doses of an mRNA COVID-19 vaccine to get the most protection....



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Expanding your COVID-19 vaccination efforts to 12–15-year-olds? Purchase IAC’s brightly colored COVID-19 vaccine stickers and buttons to give out in offices, schools, and mass vaccination sites

IAC now offers “I Got My COVID-19 Vaccine” buttons and stickers for purchase. Vaccinated adolescents will enjoy adding these stickers and buttons to their uniforms, jackets, lanyards, or backpacks!

   

Buttons: Wear them in the clinic to demonstrate your support for COVID-19 vaccination and to remind those around you to protect themselves from COVID-19.

Stickers: Give away to COVID-19 vaccine recipients or vaccinated clinic staff!

  • Description: Bright yellow stickers on a roll with an easy-peel-off back and perforations between stickers to make them easy to tear off and share
  • Packaging: Roll of 200 stickers
  • Dimension: 1.5" across
  • To order: See Shop IAC: COVID-19 Vaccine Buttons and Stickers for quantity and pricing options

Please note: Through a separate program supported by CDC, public health departments and CDC’s nonprofit Vaccinate with Confidence campaign, partners are able to receive supplies of these buttons and stickers free of charge. For questions about this program, email admininfo@immunize.org or call 651-647-9009.
 
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“Demographic and Social Factors Associated with COVID-19 Vaccination Initiation among Adults Aged ≥65 Years—United States, December 14, 2020–April 10, 2021” published in MMWR

CDC published Demographic and Social Factors Associated with COVID-19 Vaccination Initiation among Adults Aged ≥65 Years—United States, December 14, 2020–April 10, 2021 in the May 14 issue of MMWR. A portion of the summary appears below.

Older adults have experienced higher risk for COVID-19–associated morbidity and mortality and therefore have been prioritized for COVID-19 vaccination....

...After the first 3.5 months of the U.S. COVID-19 vaccination program, 79.1% of adults aged ≥65 years had received ≥1 dose, with higher vaccination initiation among men. Counties with lower vaccination initiation rates had higher percentages of older adults with social vulnerabilities.

...Monitoring demographic and social factors affecting COVID-19 vaccine access for older adults and prioritizing efforts to ensure equitable access to COVID-19 vaccine are needed to ensure high coverage among this group.

Access the MMWR article in HTML format or in PDF format.

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  • MMWR's gateway page provides access to MMWR Weekly, MMWR Recommendations and Reports, MMWR Surveillance Summaries, and MMWR Supplements

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“Surveillance of Vaccination Coverage among Adult Populations—United States, 2018” published in MMWR Surveillance Summaries 

CDC published Surveillance of Vaccination Coverage among Adult Populations—United States, 2018 in the May 14 issue of MMWR Surveillance Summaries. The Interpretation paragraph appears below.

NHIS [National Health Interview Survey] data indicate that many adults remain unprotected against vaccine-preventable diseases. Coverage for the adult age-appropriate composite measures was low in all age groups. Individual adult vaccination coverage remained low as well, but modest gains occurred in vaccination coverage for hepatitis B (among adults aged ≥19 years and HCP aged ≥19 years), and HPV (among males aged 19–26 years and Hispanic females aged 19–26 years). Coverage for other vaccines and groups with Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices vaccination indications did not improve from 2017. Although HPV vaccination coverage among males aged 19–26 years and Hispanic females aged 19–26 years increased, approximately 50% of females aged 19–26 years and 70% of males aged 19–26 years remained unvaccinated. Racial/ethnic vaccination differences persisted for routinely recommended adult vaccines. Having health insurance coverage, having a usual place for health care, and having ≥1 physician contacts during the preceding 12 months were associated with higher vaccination coverage; however, these factors alone were not associated with optimal adult vaccination coverage, and findings indicate missed opportunities to vaccinate remained.

Access the MMWR Surveillance Summaries article in HTML format or in PDF format.

Related Link

  • MMWR's gateway page provides access to MMWR Weekly, MMWR Recommendations and Reports, MMWR Surveillance Summaries, and MMWR Supplements

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American College Health Association recommends COVID-19 vaccination requirements for all on-campus college students this fall

On April 29, the American College Health Association (ACHA) issued a press release announcing that “where state law and available resources allow, ACHA recommends COVID-19 vaccination requirements for all on-campus college and university students for fall semester 2021, in accordance with the IHE's [Institutes of Higher Education] normal exemption practices, including exemptions for medical contraindications. This recommendation applies to all students who live on campus and/or participate in on-campus classes, studies, research, or activities.”

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IAC Spotlight! IAC’s "Standing Orders Templates for Administering Vaccines" gateway page also provides links to CDC’s standing orders for use of COVID-19 vaccines

IAC's Standing Orders Templates for Administering Vaccines gateway page on immunize.org contains templates and related resources for vaccines recommended for children, teens, and adults. Use the templates "as is" or modify them to suit your healthcare setting's needs. The web page also provides direct links to CDC’s standing orders for administration of COVID-19 vaccines.

Using standing order templates can help you improve vaccination rates. Standing orders authorize nurses, pharmacists, and other appropriately trained healthcare personnel, where allowed by state law, to assess a patient’s immunization status and administer vaccinations according to a protocol approved by a physician, medical director, or other authorized practitioner. Standing orders work by enabling assessment and vaccination of the patient without the need for clinician examination or direct order from the attending provider at the time of the interaction. 



IAC offers 36 standing orders templates for vaccines that are routinely recommended across the lifespan. They are updated as needed and reviewed for technical accuracy by immunization experts at CDC. The current versions can be accessed at www.immunize.org/standing-orders.

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IAC’s Influenza Vaccination Honor Roll for mandatory healthcare worker vaccination now features 1,151 organizations, including three new healthcare organizations

There are now 1,151 organizations enrolled in IAC's Influenza Vaccination Honor Roll. The honor roll recognizes hospitals, long-term care facilities (LTCFs), medical practices, pharmacies, professional organizations, health departments, and other government entities that have taken a stand for patient safety by implementing mandatory influenza vaccination policies for healthcare personnel.

Since March 31, when IAC Express last reported on the Influenza Vaccination Honor Roll, three additional healthcare organizations have been enrolled.

  • North Memorial Health, Robbinsdale, MN
  • Maple Grove Hospital, Maple Grove, MN
  • Blaze Health, Robbinsdale, MN

IAC urges qualifying healthcare organizations to complete the Application page.

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IAC experts called on by news media

With vaccines in the news so much lately, journalists have sought out IAC experts to communicate the intricacies of running a quality vaccination program. Our insights have helped explain vaccines to the public and policy makers. We want to help them understand the complex work vaccinators do. We've reached mass markets and local stations, across the U.S. and overseas, via print, radio, television, blogs, and more. Here is a selection of our recent citations:

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Not-to-miss immunization articles in the news
 

These recent articles convey the potential risks of vaccine-preventable diseases and the importance of vaccination.

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Featured Resources


In this week’s “Video of the Week” titled “Worship,” viewers are reminded that getting back to the moments we miss starts with getting good information

In this PSA from the Ad Council, featuring worshippers in Black churches, viewers are reminded to get the latest information on COVID-19 vaccines. Get answers to questions about the COVID-19 vaccines at www.GetVaccineAnswers.org, the website of the COVID-19 Vaccine Education Initiative.



Visit the whole collection at the VOTW archive.

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Still available! Order IAC’s laminated version of CDC’s 2021 U.S. child/adolescent immunization schedule today! Adult schedules sold out.

IAC's laminated version of the 2021 U.S. child/adolescent immunization schedule is available for order. The 2021 U.S. adult immunization schedule has sold out.

These schedules are ideal for use in any busy healthcare setting where vaccinations are given. Their tough coating can be wiped down, and they’re durable enough to stand up to a year's worth of use. 
 
The child/adolescent schedule is eight pages (i.e., four double-sided pages), but folds down to a convenient 8.5" x 11" size.

  

With color coding for easy reading, our laminated schedules replicate the original CDC formatting, including the essential tables and notes.

PRICING
1–4 copies: $7.50 each
5–19 copies: $5.50 each
20–99 copies: $4.50 each
100–499 copies: $4.00 each
500–999 copies: $3.50 each

For quotes on customizing or placing orders of 1,000 copies or more, call 651-647-9009 or email admininfo@immunize.org.

Visit the Shop IAC: Laminated Schedules web page for more information on the schedules, to view images of all the pages, and to download the order form today!

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IAC’s “I Got My COVID-19 Vaccine” Facebook profile photo frame is available in English and Spanish

Share your excitement about COVID-19 vaccination and inspire your friends! When you have received your COVID-19 vaccine, add IAC's new "I Got My COVID-19 Vaccine" Facebook photo frame to liven up your profile picture!

You can obtain the frame in three ways:

Together we can end the COVID-19 pandemic!

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IAC’s “History through Film” web page features public television documentary about 30 years of IAC titled Protecting Health: Saving Lives. Please share.

The award-winning public television documentary series, Visionaries, hosted by Sam Waterston, features IAC in the episode Protecting Health: Saving Lives. This 30-minute film showcases IAC’s founder and executive director Dr. Deborah Wexler’s commitment to supporting the nation’s healthcare professionals with immunization education information and materials. Protecting Health: Saving Lives makes a powerful case for vaccination, addressing and defusing the fears that fuel the antivaccine movement, presenting stories of vaccine-preventable disease, and recognizing the science that has saved millions of lives through vaccination.

Protecting Health: Saving Lives is premiering on more than 100 local PBS stations nationwide in the months ahead, but you can watch it right now on IAC’s website at www.immunize.org/aboutus/iac-film-history.asp. We’d very much appreciate your circulating the film by sharing this link with your colleagues and friends through member newsletters, e-mail listservs, social media channels, conferences and web-based events, and web pages.



Sharing Protecting Health: Saving Lives is easy! Just go to https://www.immunize.org/film or click on the film's image in the right column of IAC's immunize.org main page. Click the “share” button and choose the social media site where you’d like your friends, family, and colleagues to view the film.
 
To learn more about the PBS Visionaries series, visit www.visionaries.org.

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Education and Training


Medscape Education Family Medicine offers “Expert Perspective Series: Tips for Addressing Patients FAQs about COVID-19 Vaccines” activity series; CE available
 
Medscape Education Family Medicine invites you to participate in Expert Perspective Series: Tips for Addressing Patients FAQs about COVID-19 Vaccines activity series. This online module features IAC’s Dr. L.J Tan as a featured panelist. Medscape Education Family Medicine continues to add to the collection of activities on addressing patients' questions and concerns about COVID-19 vaccines as new information becomes available.
 
This activity is supported by an independent educational grant from ModernaTX, Inc. One hour of physician, nurse, pharmacist, and interprofessional CE is available.

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CommuniVax hosts webinar “Working with Faith-Based and Community-Based Organizations for a More Equitable COVID-19 Vaccination Campaign” on May 20
 
CommuniVax will host a webinar titled Working with Faith-Based and Community-Based Organizations for a More Equitable COVID-19 Vaccination Campaign from 2:00–3:00 p.m. (ET) on May 20. Panelists will discuss how to work with faith-based and community-based organizations to make COVID-19 vaccination more equitable and strengthen the communities in which they are rooted. They will showcase unique, effective initiatives and activities that are ongoing in different communities around the country, to celebrate these successes and share learnings so that other communities can achieve their own versions of success.   

Register for the webinar. 

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North Carolina Family Medicine Today releases podcast about the importance of catching patients up on vaccinations missed during the coronavirus pandemic

North Carolina Family Medicine Today posted a new podcast, The Importance of Catching Up on Immunizationson May 8. The presenter, Dr. Leonard Friedland, a pediatrician and vice president and director of scientific affairs and public health at GSK, discusses the precipitous drop in immunization rates during the coronavirus pandemic and the need to catch up on missed vaccines as patients return to their primary care physician.

Visit the NCFM website podcast page to listen and subscribe.

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Conferences and Meetings

FDA holds Vaccines and Related Biological Products Advisory Committee (VRBPAC) virtual meeting June 10 to discuss pediatric use of COVID-19 vaccines

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) will convene its Vaccines and Related Biological Products Advisory Committee (VRBPAC) on June 10 to discuss the pediatric use of COVID-19 vaccines. During the meeting, the FDA will provide a status update on their approach to Emergency Use Authorization (EUA) for COVID-19 vaccines intended for use in adolescents age 12–17. The committee is not scheduled to be asked to opine about any specific product.

Each meeting will be webcast; access details will appear at FDA web pages linked below.

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Immunization PSAs from the Archive


In this vintage 1974 PSA from U.S. Department of Health, Education, and Welfare, singer Dionne Warwick explains the importance of having your child vaccinated against “both kinds of measles,” especially when you have a baby on the way

In this 1974 vintage public service announcement (PSA) from the U.S. Department of Health, Education, and Welfare, singer Dionne Warwick explains the importance of having your child vaccinated against "both kinds of measles," especially when you have a baby on the way. This PSA is part of a collection curated by vaccine expert William L. Atkinson, MD, MPH.
 

Previous PSAs featured in “From the Archives” are available when viewing this Vimeo video

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About IAC Express
The Immunization Action Coalition welcomes redistribution of this issue of IAC Express or selected articles. When you do so, please add a note that the Immunization Action Coalition is the source of the material and provide a link to this issue.

IAC Express is supported in part by Grant No. 6NH23IP922550 from the National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases, CDC. Its contents are solely the responsibility of IAC and do not necessarily represent the official views of CDC.

IAC Express Disclaimer
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About IZ Express

IZ Express is supported in part by Grant No. 1NH23IP922654 from CDC’s National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases. Its contents are solely the responsibility of Immunize.org and do not necessarily represent the official views of CDC.

IZ Express Disclaimer
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Editorial Information

  • Editor-in-Chief
    Kelly L. Moore, MD, MPH
  • Managing Editor
    John D. Grabenstein, RPh, PhD
  • Associate Editor
    Sharon G. Humiston, MD, MPH
  • Writer/Publication Coordinator
    Taryn Chapman, MS
    Courtnay Londo, MA
  • Style and Copy Editor
    Marian Deegan, JD
  • Web Edition Managers
    Arkady Shakhnovich
    Jermaine Royes
  • Contributing Writer
    Laurel H. Wood, MPA
  • Technical Reviewer
    Kayla Ohlde

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