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Issue 1519
Issue 1,519: September 30, 2020
Top Stories

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On the Lighter Side

 


Top Stories


CDC publishes “Meningococcal Vaccination: Recommendations of the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices, U.S., 2020” in MMWR

CDC published Meningococcal Vaccination: Recommendations of the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices, United States, 2020 in the September 25 issue of MMWR Recommendations and Reports. The summary is reprinted below.

This report compiles and summarizes all recommendations from CDC’s Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) for use of meningococcal vaccines in the United States. As a comprehensive summary and update of previously published recommendations, it replaces all previously published reports and policy notes. This report also contains new recommendations for administration of booster doses of serogroup B meningococcal (MenB) vaccine for persons at increased risk for serogroup B meningococcal disease. These guidelines will be updated as needed on the basis of availability of new data or licensure of new meningococcal vaccines.

ACIP recommends routine vaccination with a quadrivalent meningococcal conjugate vaccine (MenACWY) for adolescents aged 11 or 12 years, with a booster dose at age 16 years. ACIP also recommends routine vaccination with MenACWY for persons aged ≥2 months at increased risk for meningococcal disease caused by serogroups A, C, W, or Y, including persons who have persistent complement component deficiencies; persons receiving a complement inhibitor (e.g., eculizumab [Soliris] or ravulizumab [Ultomiris]); persons who have anatomic or functional asplenia; persons with human immunodeficiency virus infection; microbiologists routinely exposed to isolates of 
Neisseria meningitidis; persons identified to be at increased risk because of a meningococcal disease outbreak caused by serogroups A, C, W, or Y; persons who travel to or live in areas in which meningococcal disease is hyperendemic or epidemic; unvaccinated or incompletely vaccinated first-year college students living in residence halls; and military recruits. ACIP recommends MenACWY booster doses for previously vaccinated persons who become or remain at increased risk.

In addition, ACIP recommends routine use of MenB vaccine series among persons aged ≥10 years who are at increased risk for serogroup B meningococcal disease, including persons who have persistent complement component deficiencies; persons receiving a complement inhibitor; persons who have anatomic or functional asplenia; microbiologists who are routinely exposed to isolates of N. meningitidis; and persons identified to be at increased risk because of a meningococcal disease outbreak caused by serogroup B. ACIP recommends MenB booster doses for previously vaccinated persons who become or remain at increased risk. In addition, ACIP recommends a MenB series for adolescents and young adults aged 16–23 years on the basis of shared clinical decision-making to provide short-term protection against disease caused by most strains of serogroup B N. meningitidis.


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IAC summarizes ACIP's third special meeting on COVID-19 vaccination strategies

On September 22, the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) held a virtual meeting to continue discussions on topics related to COVID-19. The meeting started with a quick summary of the development status of various COVID-19 vaccine candidates. Next, CDC staff described the current epidemiology of the pandemic. Most of the meeting addressed how to prioritize initial doses of vaccine as well as the multiple mechanisms through which vaccine safety will be monitored.

Highlights of the meeting, at which no votes were taken, are outlined below. More detailed information is available by linking to the presentation slides associated with each topic.

Vaccine Trial Overview and ACIP Workgroup Activities: More than 200 COVID-19 vaccines are currently under development. As vaccine candidates continue to advance through various phases of FDA review, information on which vaccine is in which phase is rapidly evolving. Therefore, some of the information provided at the September ACIP meeting is already out of date. Readers are advised to consult updated tracking tables to obtain the most current information, such as this one from the Washington Post.
 
The ACIP COVID-19 Workgroup (WG) meets weekly to review available data from vaccine developers. Based on its deliberations, the WG will present policy options for consideration and a vote by the full ACIP. Upon the FDA announcing release of a COVID-19 vaccine (either through Emergency Use Authorization or traditional licensure), ACIP will promptly hold an emergency meeting by webinar and use its traditional decision tools (e.g., Evidence to Recommendation and GRADE) to review available data for safety and efficacy. ACIP would vote on policy options and prioritized population segments. As usual, these recommendations will be submitted to the CDC Director. If accepted, these become official CDC policy upon publication in the MMWR.

COVID-19 Vaccine Safety: Two independent advisory committees [ACIP and the FDA’s Vaccines and Related Biological Products Advisory Committee (VRBPAC)] review vaccine safety data. ACIP also monitors post-market safety and effectiveness data for new vaccines. For COVID-19, ACIP has formed a separate Vaccine Safety Technical (VaST) Subgroup to provide timely evaluation of vaccine safety, both pre- and post-licensure.

Enhanced Safety Monitoring for COVID-19 Vaccines: In addition to the Vaccine Adverse Events Reporting System (VAERS) and other systems routinely used by CDC and FDA to monitor vaccine safety, CDC is adding further monitoring programs for COVID-19 vaccines. Data on vaccinated healthcare workers will be collected through the National Healthcare Safety Network (NHSN) system. The Vaccine Safety Assessment for Essential Workers (V-SAFE) program, a smartphone-based active surveillance system, will collect text- or web-based health checks from early vaccine recipients who volunteer to report for 6 weeks post-vaccination. Any clinically important event(s) reported by the vaccinee will be followed up and a VAERS report will be submitted, as appropriate.

COVID-19 Vaccine Implementation Planning Update: On September 16, CDC released its COVID-19 Vaccination Program Interim Playbook for Jurisdiction Operations. This document guides jurisdictions as they develop plans for COVID-19 vaccine distribution and management, including reaching critical populations for vaccination, recruiting and training vaccinators, developing ordering and distribution plans, maintaining recommended vaccine storage parameters, and facilitating data collection and sharing. CDC and Operation Warp Speed (OWS) partners are providing technical assistance to support these plans. In addition, CDC continues to work with national commercial partners (e.g., pharmacy chains) and federal entities (e.g., Veterans Affairs) that will receive vaccine directly through CDC rather than through state programs.

COVID-19 Epidemiology and Disparities: ACIP members reviewed the current epidemiology of COVID-19 in the U.S., emphasizing disparities in disease incidence, severity, and outcomes related to social determinants of health (SDH). SDH are conditions (e.g., economic stability, education, housing, disability, health insurance status, access to transport) in places where people live, learn, work, and play. A Social Vulnerability Index (SVI) uses these factors to describe counties and census tracts. CDC’s analyses show that counties in the highest (most vulnerable) SVI category had a greater risk of being a COVID-19 hotspot compared to counties in the lowest (least vulnerable) category. This difference in COVID-19 risk between the most and least socially vulnerable communities was most pronounced in rural and non-urban areas. Disadvantageous social determinants of health are strongly associated with the increased risk of infection, hospitalization, and death from COVID-19 observed among racial and ethnic minority groups.

Overview of Vaccine Equity and Prioritization Frameworks: Several national and international groups have proposed guiding frameworks for allocating initial limited supplies of a COVID-19 vaccine. ACIP reviewed these frameworks and will consider them as the Committee develops its recommendations about which groups to prioritize for early vaccination. As established at prior ACIP meetings, its recommendations will be shaped by the values of equity, justice, fairness, and transparency. ACIP also will take into account vaccine-specific information from clinical trials and operational feasibility.

Phase 1 Vaccine Allocation Planning: The ACIP meeting concluded with a presentation reviewing possible priority groups for vaccination during initial phases when vaccine availability will be limited. Broadly, high-priority groups are expected to include healthcare personnel, essential workers (non-healthcare), persons with high-risk medical conditions, and adults age 65 years or older. However, ACIP will not finalize its prioritization recommendations until more data are available about specific vaccine(s) released by FDA, including each vaccine’s storage and handling requirements, vaccine efficacy in specific age groups, and the number of doses available.

The next planned ACIP meeting is the regularly scheduled meeting in October; it is currently scheduled for October 28–30. However, the CDC would convene an emergency ACIP meeting before that time if needed to respond to FDA vaccine decisions. Details about past and future ACIP meetings are available on the ACIP website.

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IAC updates 11 Ask the Experts web pages
 
IAC’s Ask the Experts includes more than 1,000 questions and answers to common and challenging situations immunization providers face every day. All Ask the Experts questions and answers are periodically reviewed and updated as needed, even in the absence of changes in CDC recommendations. The IAC Ask the Experts team recently completed reviews of several sections. Edits include minor updates, clarifications, and updated links to outside resources. Visit these pages to find the answers you are looking for! 

Vaccine-specific reviewed sections:

Topic-specific reviewed sections:



IAC’s team of experts includes Kelly L. Moore, MD, MPH (lead); Carolyn Bridges, MD, FACP; William Atkinson, MD, MPH; and Deborah Wexler, MD.

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Organizing a mass vaccination clinic? Plan to attend IAC’s how-to webinar on October 15, 2020

Mass vaccination clinics allow the rapid and efficient administration of vaccines to a large number of people over a relatively short period of time. This approach can help during delivery of routinely recommended vaccines like influenza. It can also be used once COVID-19 vaccines are released. How can you plan and manage such a daunting undertaking?
 
Mark your calendar to attend IAC’s informative webinar, “Mass Vaccination Clinics: Challenges and Best Practices” on October 15, 2020, at 1:00–2:30 pm ET. Experienced providers will discuss successes and challenges in conducting mass-vaccination clinics and they will highlight best practices and offer practical information for ensuring a successful clinic. Expert speakers include:

  • Kevin Cleveland, PharmD, ANP, Assistant Dean and Director for Experiential Education, Idaho State University College of Pharmacy, Meridian, ID
  • Karen Sharpnack, Executive Director, Idaho Immunization Coalition
  • Ruth Carrico, PhD, DNP, ARPN, CIC, Professor, University of Louisville, Louisville, KY
  • Jeanne Marconi, MD; FAAP; Behavioral and Mental Health, Pediatricians; The Center for Advanced Pediatrics, Norwalk, CT
  • Andrew Kroger, MD, MPH, Medical Officer, National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases, CDC, Atlanta, GA

Register now to attend this free webinar.
 
This webinar is supported by a medical education grant from Seqirus, Inc.

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Six additional colleges and universities require flu vaccine to protect staff and students—the list grows! 

Many colleges and universities across the nation are mandating flu vaccine for staff and students. IAC has recently become aware of six additional schools that will require influenza vaccine this year, including: Cornell University, Dordt UniversityElon University, Rochester Institute of Technology, University of Southern California, and Wayne State University.

Under a new statewide regulation in Massachusetts, approximately 115 colleges and universities will be implementing requirements for influenza vaccination this year. 

In addition, the following schools require influenza vaccine this year: University of California system—ten campuses, University of Tennessee system—four campuses, Butler UniversityDuke UniversityPurdue UniversityRosalind Franklin UniversitySyracuse UniversityUniversity of MiamiUniversity of Pennsylvania, and Wabash College.

If you know of additional colleges or universities that require influenza vaccination, please send the name of the institution, as well as a link to the relevant policy (if available) to admin@immunize.org.

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October 1: NFID will hold its annual influenza and pneumococcal news conference 

The annual National Foundation for Infectious Diseases (NFID) Influenza and Pneumococcal Vaccination Kick-Off news conference will be held tomorrow, October 1, in Washington, DC. At the event, a panel of experts will discuss previous and upcoming flu seasons. NFID will also share results from a new national survey of U.S. adults to better understand attitudes and behaviors about COVID-19, influenza, and pneumococcal disease.

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CDC publishes “Travel-Associated Measles in a Person Born Before 1957—Pinellas County, Florida, 2019” in MMWR 

CDC published Travel-Associated Measles in a Person Born Before 1957—Pinellas County, Florida, 2019 in the September 25 issue of MMWR. Portions of the article are reprinted below.

... On April 19, 2019, the Pinellas County (Florida) Health Department (Pinellas CHD) Epidemiology Program was notified by a local hospital of a case of serologically confirmed measles in a man aged 72 years. The patient was evaluated in a hospital emergency department (ED) on April 15 with a 5-day history of fever, followed 2 days later by cough, and a maculopapular rash that started on his trunk on April 15. In the ED the patient experienced difficulty breathing and was admitted. In the hospital he received a diagnosis of pneumonia and subsequently developed sepsis and was transferred to the intensive care unit...

... Persons born before 1957 are presumed to be immune because of the likelihood of having been infected with measles during childhood; however, the occurrence of measles in a person born before 1957 suggests that these cases can occur. Health care providers should consider measles in all persons who returned from international travel and are evaluated with febrile rash illness, regardless of age.

 

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CDC releases "Digital Media Toolkit" for 2020–21 flu season 

The CDC's HCP Fight Flu Toolkit provides primary care physicians, nurses, pharmacists, and other healthcare professionals (HCP) with the resources needed to fight the flu in their practices. The materials will equip HCP to make strong influenza vaccine recommendations, facilitate productive conversations with patients, and improve influenza vaccination rates.



The 2020–21 Digital Campaign Toolkit includes a listing of events, print-ready materials in multiple languages, sample social media and newsletter content, videos, web resources, and a VaccineFinder web widget. This material is downloadable, shareable, and some of the material is customizable. Important dates featured include the CDC's Instagram Flu Vaccination Q&A​ on October 7 and National Influenza Vaccination Week (NIVW), which runs from December 6–12.



Both toolkits can be viewed and downloaded in Spanish by choosing the "Español" link at the top of the page.

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IAC Spotlight! "IAC in the News" gateway page is a collection of media articles and appearances featuring IAC experts; we’ve been busy!

IAC leaders have been go-to immunization resources for the media for years. Recently, the New York Times, Wall Street Journal, Washington Post, Newsweek, USA Today, Atlantic, Politico, CNN, CNBC, NPR, and other outlets have benefitted from IAC’s expertise.
 
The IAC in the News gateway page leads to a chronological collection of these media articles and appearances. This page can be found by selecting "About IAC" at the top of every immunize.org page and then selecting "IAC In the News" from the left sidebar. 



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Not-to-miss immunization articles in the news

These recent articles convey the potential risks of vaccine-preventable diseases and the importance of vaccination.

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Stay up to date on the latest coronavirus information 

CDC, NIH, WHO, and Johns Hopkins are closely monitoring the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic. Check the resources below for the latest information. Stay in touch with your local and state health departments. 

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IAC Handouts


IAC updates its popular resource titled “Summary of Recommendations for Adult Immunization (Age 19 Years and Older)”

IAC recently revised Summary of Recommendations for Adult Immunization (Age 19 Years and Older) to remove immunosuppression as a precaution for LAIV, as it was also listed correctly as a contraindication.



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IAC revises its meningococcal ACWY standing orders templates for both children/teens and adults

IAC recently revised its two standing orders templates for administering meningococcal ACWY vaccine, shown below. 

Standing Orders for Administering Meningococcal ACWY Vaccine to Children and Teens: Several revisions were incorporated, including 1) consideration of catch-up vaccination for older teens/young adults age 19 through 21 years and 2) listing a recently licensed MenACWY vaccine, MenQuadfi by Sanofi Pasteur.

Standing Orders for Administering Meningococcal ACWY Vaccine to Adults: Changes were made to consider catch-up vaccination for adults age 19 through 21 years and to give a dose of MenACWY to certain college students whose most recent dose was given after the 16th birthday and more than 5 years have elapsed.



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IAC updates “Meningococcal ACWY Vaccine Recommendations by Age and Risk Factor”

IAC recently updated Meningococcal ACWY Vaccine Recommendations by Age and Risk Factor. Several revisions were incorporated, including the consideration of catch-up vaccination for adults age 19 through 21 years, clarification of booster dose recommendations, and the listing of a recently licensed MenACWY vaccine, MenQuadfi by Sanofi Pasteur.

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Official Releases and Announcements


September 28: World Rabies Day

September 28 was World Rabies Day and CDC remains committed to worldwide rabies control efforts to reach #ZeroBy30. This year’s theme: End Rabies: Collaborate, Vaccinate. You can help in the fight against rabies by keeping dogs and cats up to date on their periodic rabies vaccinations and collaborating with healthcare providers, veterinarians, educators, community workers, policy makers, and others in your community to raise awareness on rabies prevention and control. 



Access the World Rabies Day website for more information.

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World News


World Health Assembly endorses resolution titled “Strengthening Global Immunization Efforts to Leave No One Behind” to extend benefits of vaccines to everyone, everywhere

On August 3, 2020, the World Health Assembly (a conclave of national ministers of health) adopted Immunization Agenda 2030 (IA2030). A portion of WHO's featured story, 73rd World Health Assembly Decisions, is reprinted below. 

The Immunization Agenda 2030 strategic proposal envisions a world where everyone, everywhere, at every age, fully benefits from vaccines to improve health and well-being. The key goal is to extend the benefits of vaccines to everyone, everywhere. The strategy is people-centric, led by countries, implemented through broad partnerships and driven by data. It systematically applies these 4 core principles across a set of key priorities, highlighting that immunization is an investment for the future, creating a healthier, safer and more prosperous world for all.
 
Vaccines are available to prevent more than 20 life-threatening diseases, helping people of all ages live longer, healthier lives. Immunization currently prevents well over 3 million deaths every year from diseases like diphtheria, tetanus, pertussis, influenza and measles; yet far too many people around the world—including nearly 20 million infants each year—have insufficient access to vaccines.


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Featured Resources


In IAC's "Video of the Week," CDC reminds individuals to roll up their sleeves for their annual flu vaccine

This September 2020 video from CDC reminds us that we need protection from both influenza and COVID-19 in the months ahead. Mask up, lather up, keep a distance, and get your flu vaccine. These simple actions will help protect you, your family, and your community from respiratory diseases. They will also reduce the burden of influenza illness, saving medical resources for people with COVID-19.



Visit the VOTW archive.

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IAC’s “History through Film” web page features PBS documentary about 30 years of IAC titled Protecting Health: Saving Lives. Please share.

The award-winning PBS television documentary series, Visionaries, hosted by Sam Waterston features IAC in the episode, Protecting Health: Saving Lives. This 30-minute film showcases IAC’s founder and executive director Dr. Deborah Wexler’s commitment to supporting the nation’s healthcare professionals with immunization education information and materials. Protecting Health: Saving Lives makes a powerful case for vaccination, addressing and defusing the fears that fuel the antivaccine movement, presenting stories of vaccine-preventable disease, and recognizing the science that has saved millions of lives through vaccination.

Protecting Health: Saving Lives is premiering on more than 100 PBS stations nationwide in the months ahead, but you can watch it right now on IAC’s website at www.immunize.org/aboutus/iac-film-history.asp. We’d very much appreciate your circulating the film by sharing this link with your colleagues and friends through member newsletters, e-mail listservs, social media channels, conferences and web-based events, and web pages.



Sharing Protecting Health: Saving Lives is easy! Just go to https://www.immunize.org/aboutus/iac-film-history.asp or click on the film's image in the right column of IAC's immunize.org main page. Click the “share” button, and choose the social media site where you’d like your friends, family, and colleagues to view the film.
 
To learn more about the PBS Visionaries series, visit www.visionaries.org.

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It's time to start vaccinating against flu. IAC’s bright red "FLU VACCINE" buttons and stickers can help. Order today!

IAC “FLU VACCINE” buttons and stickers are flying out of IAC’s office by the thousands! Their bright red color helps broadcast your important message about the need for flu vaccination. And the cost is nominal.



“FLU VACCINE” BUTTONS

The button measures 1.25" across and carries a bold message! Pin on lab coats, uniforms, other clothing, tote bags, or backpacks to show support for flu vaccine.
 
Buttons are delivered in bags of 10 buttons per bag.

Click here for pricing and ordering information for "FLU VACCINE" buttons.

“FLU VACCINE” STICKERS
 
Measuring 1.5" across, these stickers adhere well to clothing and have an easy-peel-off back.
 
Stickers are delivered to you cut individually (not on rolls)—available in bundles of 100. 

Click here for pricing and ordering information for “FLU VACCINE” stickers.

Visit Shop IAC for additional items, including "Vaccines Save Lives" enamel pins, patient record cards, and a vaccine administration training video.

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Use IAC's expanded Repository of Resources for Maintaining Immunization during the COVID-19 Pandemic to catch up patients who fell behind

IAC now offers more than 213 items in its Repository of Resources for Maintaining Immunization during the COVID-19 Pandemic to assist in maintaining routine immunization rates during the COVID-19 pandemic. Located on the website of the National Network of Immunization Coalitions, a project of IAC, this repository includes links to both national and state-level policies and guidance; advocacy materials, including talking points, webinars, press releases, articles, and social media posts; and telehealth resources.

These resources are intended for healthcare settings, state and local health departments, professional societies, immunization coalitions, advocacy groups, and the community to use in their efforts to sustain routine immunizations during the COVID-19 pandemic. The resources can be sorted and searched by date, title, geographic area, source, type, age category, or setting.



If you have a resource to suggest for the repository, please send a message to info@immunizationcoalitions.org.

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IAC’s new website, Mass-Vaccination-Resources.org, offers high quality resources to help jumpstart your mass vaccination efforts

The Immunization Action Coalition’s newest website, www.Mass-Vaccination-Resources.org, assists you in finding a wide range of ideas for developing your own mass vaccination clinics. Mass vaccination efforts will be useful for expediting flu vaccination this fall and may be needed after COVID-19 vaccines are licensed for use in large groups of people.

The website features a searchable list of resources for a variety of venues, including curbside, drive-through, and walk-through clinics; mobile medical vans; pharmacies; and schools. The database contains guidance documents, toolkits, publications, and other helpful resources that can be adapted to your community or individual healthcare setting.


 
Many of the documents were written in the pre-pandemic era and will need modification to ensure that additional protections, such as social distancing and personal protective equipment, help safeguard against COVID-19 transmission.
 
If you have a resource to suggest for the website, please send a message to info@mass-vaccination-resources.org. Everything received will be considered for placement on the new website.
 
This new website is supported by a medical education grant from Seqirus, Inc.

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Journal Articles and Newsletters


CHOP's Vaccine Education Center publishes September issue of Vaccine Update newsletter

The Vaccine Education Center (VEC) at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) publishes a monthly immunization-focused newsletter titled Vaccine Update. The September issue includes the following articles:

Additional resources, including information booklets for patients, are available in the full newsletter.

Access the sign-up form to subscribe to Vaccine Update.

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Education and Training


Families Fighting Flu and Boost Oregon co-host webinar about flu vaccine messaging on October 2 
 
Families Fighting Flu and Boost Oregon will present a 1-hour webinar on flu vaccine messaging, beginning at 3:00 p.m. (ET) on October 2. During the webinar, Families Fighting Flu advocate Becky Crane will share the story of her son's recent flu death. Nadine Gartner, Founding Executive Director for Boost Oregon, will share best practices for messaging about flu vaccination this season.  

Register for the webinar.

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AAP and CDC collaborate to offer webinar "Recommendations for Influenza Prevention and Treatment in Children: An Update for Pediatric Providers" on October 8
 
The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) and CDC are collaborating to present a free Clinical Outreach and Communication Activity (COCA) webinar titled Recommendations for Influenza Prevention and Treatment in Children: An Update for Pediatric Providers on October 8 from 2:00–3:00 p.m. (ET). 

During this COCA call, subject matter experts from the AAP and CDC will discuss strategies primary care providers and medical subspecialists can use to improve flu prevention and control in children this season.

Access more information about this webinar, including how to register: Recommendations for Influenza Prevention and Treatment in Children: An Update for Pediatric Providers. Free continuing education credits are available.

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CDC's recorded webinar on pneumococcal vaccines, as well as 13 other segments in "The Pink Book" weekly series, available now

CDC continues its 15-part pre-recorded webinar series to provide a chapter-by-chapter overview of the 13th edition of Epidemiology and Prevention of Vaccine-Preventable Diseases (also known as "The Pink Book"). The series discusses vaccination principles, general best practices, immunization strategies, and specific information about vaccine-preventable diseases and the vaccines that prevent them. Each broadcast includes updated information from Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) meetings.

The final webinar, on influenza vaccines, will be released on October 14; no registration is required. The link to this course can be accessed at midday on October 14 or thereafter. 
 
Videos of the first fourteen 1-hour webinars are available online now.
 
Information and program details are available on CDC's Pink Book Webinar Series web page.

Continuing education credits are available for each event. Questions about the material can be submitted to nipinfo@cdc.gov.

All the sections of "The Pink Book" (i.e., chapters, appendices, 2017 supplement) are available to download at no charge at www.cdc.gov/vaccines/pubs/pinkbook/index.html. You also can order this resource from the Public Health Foundation for $45 plus shipping and handling.

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Conferences and Meetings

NPHIC and CDC virtually co-host 2020 Health Communication, Marketing and Media Forum, October 6–8

The National Public Health Information Coalition (NPHIC) and CDC are co-hosting a multi-day, online Health Communication, Marketing, and Media Forum. This free program will be held each day from October 6–8, 2020 from 1:00 to 3:00 p.m. (ET). Daily panel session titles are listed below. 

  • Day 1: Addressing Health Equity and Social Justice Issues during a Pandemic: What Is the Role of the Heath Communication, Marketing and Media Professional?
  • Day 2: Achieving Understanding and Acceptance of COVID-19 Vaccination: How Do Recent Survey Research and Findings Help Inform Communication Strategies and Messaging?
  • Day 3: How Misinformation and the Coronavirus Begins, Spreads and Can Be Effectively Addressed?

In addition, selected abstracts will be featured in an asynchronous platform.  

Register for the Forum.

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Register now for online NFID Clinical Vaccinology Course, November 15–17 

The National Foundation of Infectious Diseases (NFID) Fall 2020 Clinical Vaccinology Course will be held online November 15–17. This 3-day online course focuses on new developments and issues related to the use of vaccines. Expert faculty provide the latest information on vaccines, including updated recommendations for vaccinations across the lifespan, and innovative and practical strategies for ensuring timely and appropriate immunization.

Register for the online course ($750 fee).

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On the Lighter Side

In this 30-second 2002 PSA from U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, babies promote importance of childhood immunizations

In this nostalgic look at vaccine advocacy 18 years ago, babies promote the importance of childhood immunizations. Produced by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services in 2002, it is part of a PSA collection curated by vaccine expert William L. Atkinson, MD, MPH.



Previous PSAs mentioned in “On the Lighter Side” are available when viewing this Vimeo video.

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About IAC Express
The Immunization Action Coalition welcomes redistribution of this issue of IAC Express or selected articles. When you do so, please add a note that the Immunization Action Coalition is the source of the material and provide a link to this issue.

IAC Express is supported in part by Grant No. 6NH23IP922550 from the National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases, CDC. Its contents are solely the responsibility of IAC and do not necessarily represent the official views of CDC.

IAC Express Disclaimer
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Editor
Deborah L. Wexler, MD
Associate Editors
John D. Grabenstein, RPh, PhD
Sharon Humiston, MD, MPH
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Marian Deegan, JD
Courtnay Londo, MA
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Liv Augusta Anderson, MPP
 
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Immunization Action Coalition  •  2550 University Avenue West  •  Suite 415 North  •  Saint Paul, Minnesota  •  55114
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This website is supported in part by a cooperative agreement from the National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases (Grant No. 6NH23IP22550) at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in Atlanta, GA. The website content is the sole responsibility of IAC and does not necessarily represent the official views of CDC.