Immunization Action Coalition and the Hepatitis B Coalition

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Issue Number 418            October 20, 2003

CONTENTS OF THIS ISSUE

  1. New: CDC posts comprehensive "Immunize Now" provider kit; CMS website has news about increased vaccine payments
  2. FDA and CDC statement counters rumors concerning influenza vaccination contamination
  3. New: October issue of "NEEDLE TIPS" is in the mail and on the Web
  4. Influenza vaccination of adults 50 and over and pneumococcal vaccination of adults 65 and over nowhere near 2010 goals
  5. National Medical Association promotes flu shots for African Americans
  6. New translation: Spanish-language live intranasal influenza vaccine VIS now on IAC website
  7. National Quality Forum endorses new national voluntary consensus standards for Nursing Home Performance Measures
  8. CDC notifies readers about its Viral Hepatitis Resource Center
  9. CDC notifies readers about the International Conference on Women and Infectious Diseases
  10. Thank you, readers, for faxing headlines from last week's Dear Abby column promoting influenza vaccination
  11. Report on the first phase of the Immunization Coalition Sustainability Project is complete and available online

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October 20, 2003
NEW: CDC POSTS COMPREHENSIVE "IMMUNIZE NOW" PROVIDER KIT; CMS WEBSITE HAS NEWS ABOUT INCREASED VACCINE PAYMENTS

In conjunction with Adult Immunization Awareness Week (October 12-18), the National Immunization Program, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), announced its new "Immunize Now" provider kit is available online. In addition, the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) recently increased the Medicare Part B Maximum allowable reimbursement for influenza and pneumococcal vaccine (details at the end of this article).

"IMMUNIZE NOW" PROVIDER KIT
The kit is designed to help health care providers and professionals promote immunization against influenza and pneumococcal disease and effectively reach people for whom these vaccinations are recommended.

Available for printing in color and/or black and white, the materials in the kit include the following for providers and patients.

For providers (available in English only):

  • Influenza and pneumococcal immunization letter from Dr. Julie L. Gerberding, Director, CDC
     
  • Three information sheets: (1) What's New for Fall 2003? (2) Time-Saving Help and Feedback Form (3) Free CDC Immunization Resources and Order Form
     
  • Summary of Recommendations for Inactivated Influenza Vaccine and Pneumococcal Polysaccharide Vaccine
     
  • Influenza Vaccination Pocket Guide
     
  • Recommended Adult Immunization Schedule by Age Group and Medical Conditions--United States, 2003-2004

For patients (all available in English and Spanish):

  • Four 8-1/2" x 11" flyers: (1) Flu Vaccine Facts & Myths (2) To Protect Yourself and Those You Love (3) When Should You Get Your Flu Vaccination? (4) Who Is at High Risk for Flu Complications? (black and white only).
     
  • Two posters: (1) Community Immunity: Dominos (2) Top Three Reasons to Get Your Flu Vaccine (also available as a flyer in black and white only).

In addition, a kit diagram and packaging files are available to help prepare kits for distribution.

To access the "Immunize Now" provider kit, go to:
http://www.cdc.gov/nip/flu/providerkit.htm


MEDICARE INCREASES REIMBURSEMENT FOR INFLUENZA AND PNEUMOCOCCAL VACCINES
Effective September 1, the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) increased the Medicare Part B maximum allowable reimbursement for inactivated influenza vaccine to $9.95 per dose (previously $8.02). Effective October 1, CMS increased the Medicare Part B maximum allowable reimbursement for pneumococcal vaccine to $18.62 per dose (previously $13.10).

To access more information about these and other issues related to immunization, visit the Medicare Learning Network's "Immunization Quick Reference Guide" at http://www.cms.hhs.gov/medlearn/refimmu.asp
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October 20, 2003
FDA AND CDC STATEMENT COUNTERS RUMORS CONCERNING INFLUENZA VACCINATION CONTAMINATION

On October 17, the National Immunization Program requested that the Immunization Action Coalition and other providers of email news services publish the following press release, which was issued by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

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FDA AND CDC STATEMENT CONCERNING RUMORS ABOUT RECALLED LOT OF INFLUENZA VACCINE

Rumors have been circulating that a "contaminated" lot of flu vaccine has been recalled by the FDA. This is false. No contamination of any flu vaccine has been identified anywhere in the U.S., and the FDA has not recalled any lot of flu vaccine. Flu vaccine is routinely tested for safety, purity, and potency and all lots released have met these standards. As with any vaccine, flu vaccine is capable of causing some side effects, these are very rarely severe. Most side effects from flu vaccine are mild, such as arm soreness, redness or swelling where the shot was given, fever, or achiness. More serious reactions to the flu vaccine do occur, but they are rare. While FDA and CDC are currently investigating several recent reports of possible significant allergic reactions to flu vaccine, it is important to note that the number and type of reactions reported to date are not unexpected. The reactions reported, not all of which may have been caused by the administration of vaccine, do not, at this time, suggest any problem with the flu vaccine. However, FDA and CDC will continue to investigate these and any other reports and will provide any further information as available. While serious reactions to flu vaccine are rare, each year about 114,000 people in the U.S. are hospitalized and about 36,000 people die because of the flu. The flu vaccine is the best way a person can protect themselves and their loved ones against influenza. October and November are the best months to get vaccinated--however, vaccination in December or later still provides considerable protection. For more information about influenza, go to http://www.cdc.gov/nip/flu

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To access the press release, go to:
http://www.cdc.gov/od/oc/media/pressrel/r031017a.htm
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October 20, 2003
NEW: OCTOBER ISSUE OF "NEEDLE TIPS" IS IN THE MAIL AND ON THE WEB

The hard copy of the new "NEEDLE TIPS and the Hepatitis B Coalition News" should be arriving soon in the mail boxes of 150,000 health professionals. If you haven't received yours, you can access the entire issue or selected articles from the website of the Immunization Action Coalition (IAC). Immunization and hepatitis experts at the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) have reviewed each article and education piece in the issue for accuracy (with the exception of editorials).

Just in time for this year's influenza vaccination season, the new issue has abundant information about influenza vaccination, including information on how to access printable versions of the most recent Vaccine Information Statements for the inactivated influenza vaccine and the new live, intranasal influenza vaccine. In addition, the issue allocates several pages to explaining the complex topic of hepatitis B prevention, diagnosis, and treatment among health care professionals and the general public. Lastly, we devote two pages each to summarizing the recommendations for childhood and adult immunization. This is information you won't find anywhere else; we hope you'll peruse the table of contents (given below) and read articles that interest you online.

HOW TO READ "NEEDLE TIPS" ON THE WEB
You can download the entire issue from the Web or view selected articles from the table of contents below.

To view the table of contents with links to individual articles, go to:
http://www.immunize.org/nt

Please note: The PDF file of the entire October 2003 issue, linked below, is large at 891,883 bytes. Some printers cannot print such a large file. For tips on downloading and printing PDF files, go to: http://www.immunize.org/nslt.d/tips.htm

To download the entire PDF version of the October 2003 issue, go to: http://www.immunize.org/nslt.d/n28/n28.pdf

SUMMARIES OF INDIVIDUAL ARTICLES AND FEATURES
Summaries of "NEEDLE TIPS" articles and features are below, followed by URLs.

  1. "Ask the Experts"
    CDC immunization expert William Atkinson, MD, MPH, and viral hepatitis experts Linda Moyer, RN, and Eric Mast, MD, answer readers' questions.
     
    HTML: http://www.immunize.org/nslt.d/n28/exprt28.htm
    PDF: http://www.immunize.org/nslt.d/n28/exprt28.pdf
     
  2. "What Others Say About IAC"
    Here's a sampling of comments culled from letters of support for our work written by health professionals from many segments of the immunization community.
     
    HTML: http://www.immunize.org/nslt.d/n28/lett28.htm
    PDF: http://www.immunize.org/nslt.d/n28/lett28.pdf
     
  3. "Vaccine Highlights"
    A digest of recent recommendations and news about vaccines, vaccine resources, and Vaccine Information Statements.
     
    HTML: http://www.immunize.org/nslt.d/n28/vaccin28.htm
    PDF: http://www.immunize.org/nslt.d/n28/vaccin28.pdf
     
  4. "Give These People Influenza Vaccine!"
    This one-page professional education sheet has the latest information on the populations for whom influenza vaccine is recommended or encouraged.
     
    HTML: http://www.immunize.org/catg.d/2013flu.htm
    PDF: http://www.immunize.org/catg.d/2013flu.pdf
     
  5. "Summary of Rules for Childhood Immunization"
    Adapted from recommendations made by the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices, American Academy of Pediatrics, and American Association of Family Physicians, this two-page reference sheet summarizes information about thirteen vaccines, including the ages at which children should receive them, the catch-up schedule for each, and contraindications for each.
     
    HTML: http://www.immunize.org/nslt.d/n17/rules1.htm
    PDF: http://www.immunize.org/catg.d/rules1.pdf
     
  6. "Summary of Recommendations for Adult Immunization"
    Adapted from recommendations made by the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices, this two-page sheet outlines information about nine vaccines commonly given to adults, including details about the populations for whom each is recommended, the routine and catch-up schedule for each, and contraindications for each.
     
    HTML: http://www.immunize.org/catg.d/p2011b.htm
    PDF: http://www.immunize.org/catg.d/p2011b.pdf
     
  7. "Hepatitis B and the Health Care Worker"
    Updated in September, this two-page reference sheet explains which health care workers require hepatitis B vaccine, serologic testing, and postexposure prophylaxis.
     
    HTML: http://www.immunize.org/catg.d/2109hcw.htm
    PDF: http://www.immunize.org/catg.d/2109hcw.pdf
     
  8. "Questions Frequently Asked About Hepatitis B" by Deborah L. Wexler, MD, IAC Executive Director Updated in September, this four-page reference document discusses hepatitis B routes of infection, symptoms, testing, treatment, and prevention.
     
    HTML: http://www.immunize.org/catg.d/p4090.htm
    PDF: http://www.immunize.org/catg.d/p4090.pdf
     
  9. "How's Your State Doing?"
    Updated in August, this chart shows childhood immunization rates by state for the 4:3:1:3:3:1 series and for hepatitis B and varicella vaccines. It also shows the state school-entry requirements and implementation dates for childhood hepatitis B and varicella vaccination.
     
    PDF: http://www.immunize.org/nslt.d/n28/state28.pdf
     
  10. "Vaccine Information Statement (VIS): Inactivated Influenza Vaccine" and "Vaccine Information Statement (VIS): Live, Intranasal Influenza Vaccine"
    CDC's most recent VISs for these two vaccines.
     
    Inactivated influenza vaccine VIS
    PDF: http://www.immunize.org/vis/2flu.pdf
     
    Live intranasal influenza vaccine VIS
    PDF: http://www.immunize.org/vis/liveflu03.pdf
     
  11. "IAC's Publications and Resources Order Form"
    Order materials for patients and clinic staff here.
     
    HTML: http://www.immunize.org/nslt.d/n17/catalg1.htm
    PDF: http://www.immunize.org/nslt.d/n28/catalog.pdf
     
  12. "Letter from the Executive Director: Stay in Touch to Keep Receiving NEEDLE TIPS!"
    IAC's Executive Director, Deborah L. Wexler, MD, encourages her colleagues to support IAC by becoming contributors.
     
    HTML: http://www.immunize.org/nslt.d/n28/back28.htm
    PDF: http://www.immunize.org/nslt.d/n28/back28.pdf

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October 20, 2003
INFLUENZA VACCINATION OF ADULTS 50 AND OVER AND PNEUMOCOCCAL VACCINATION OF ADULTS 65 AND OVER NOWHERE NEAR 2010 GOALS

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) published "Public Health and Aging: Influenza Vaccination Coverage Among Adults Aged 50 Years and Over and Pneumococcal Vaccination Coverage Among Adults Aged 65 Years and Over--United States, 2002"
in the October 17 issue of "Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report" (MMWR). The article's opening paragraph and portions of the Editorial Note are reprinted below.

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[Article's opening paragraph]
Vaccination of persons at risk for complications from influenza and pneumococcal disease is a key public health strategy in preventing morbidity and mortality in the United States. During the 1990-1999 influenza seasons, approximately 36,000 deaths were attributed annually to influenza infection, with approximately 90% of deaths occurring among adults aged 65 years and older. In 1998, an estimated 3,400 adults aged 65 years and older died as a result of invasive pneumococcal disease. One of the national health objectives for 2010 is to achieve 90% coverage of noninstitutionalized adults aged 65 years and older for both influenza and pneumococcal vaccinations (objective no. 14.29). In 2000, the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) broadened the universal recommendations for influenza vaccination to include adults aged 50-64 years in addition to adults aged 65 years and older. To assess progress toward achieving the 2010 national health objective and implementing the ACIP recommendations, CDC analyzed data from the 2002 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS). This report summarizes the results of that analysis, which indicate that influenza and pneumococcal vaccination levels among adults aged 65 years and older and influenza vaccination levels among adults aged 50-64 years varied widely among states/areas and racial/ethnic populations. Innovative approaches are needed to increase vaccination coverage, particularly among certain populations.

[Portions of the Editorial Note]
The findings in this report indicate wide variability in influenza and pneumococcal vaccination coverage across states/areas and marked differences in vaccination coverage by race/ethnicity. Influenza vaccination coverage levels among adults aged 50-64 years were less than 50% in all reporting areas, substantially lower than levels among adults aged 65 years and older. In addition, both influenza and pneumococcal vaccination levels among adults aged 65 years and older were substantially below the 2010 national health objective of 90% coverage.

Estimates of influenza vaccination coverage among adults aged 50-64 years were low despite the revised ACIP recommendations in 2000. The universal recommendations were broadened to address the prevalence of high-risk medical conditions in adults aged 50-64 years, of whom approximately 29% have one or more chronic medical conditions. Age-based strategies for vaccination have been implemented more successfully than patient-selection strategies based on medical conditions. Efforts are needed to increase awareness of the revised recommendations among health-care providers and the general public. Information regarding the adult immunization schedule is available at http://www.cdc.gov/nip

Factors predictive of influenza and pneumococcal vaccination were similar, and having a source for regular health care was the factor most associated with receiving either vaccination. After adjustments were made for known potential confounding factors measured by BRFSS (i.e., education level but not direct measures of access to care, which were not available), non-Hispanic whites remained more likely to be vaccinated than non-Hispanic blacks and Hispanics. Strategies for addressing these disparities are being assessed by the Racial and Ethnic Adult Disparities Immunization Initiative (READII) through a 2-year demonstration project.

Vaccine production for the 2003-04 influenza season is proceeding on schedule, and projected production and distribution schedules will allow for a sufficient supply of influenza vaccine during October-November. Influenza vaccination may proceed for all persons at high risk and healthy persons, individually and through mass campaigns, as soon as vaccine is available and should continue until supplies are depleted. Pneumococcal vaccine should be offered all year to adults aged 65 years and older and other persons at high risk. . . .

The variation in influenza and pneumococcal vaccination coverage observed among states/areas suggests that opportunities exist to improve vaccination coverage. Although systems-based approaches (e.g., standing orders) have been effective in increasing vaccination coverage levels, these strategies are not implemented widely. To increase vaccination coverage levels, states/areas should promote these and other evidence-based strategies. Low provider reimbursement might be a barrier to vaccination; however, in 2003, Medicare increased its payment rates by 94% for administering influenza and pneumococcal vaccine. Influenza vaccination coverage among adults aged 65 years and older has leveled since 1997, and unless substantial efforts and innovative approaches are undertaken in collaboration with public, private, and community partners, the 2010 national health objective might not be achieved.

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To obtain the complete text of the article online, go to:
http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/mm5241a3.htm

To obtain a camera-ready (PDF format) copy of this issue of MMWR, go to:
http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/PDF/wk/mm5241.pdf

HOW TO OBTAIN A FREE ELECTRONIC SUBSCRIPTION TO MMWR:
To obtain a free electronic subscription to "Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report" (MMWR), visit CDC's MMWR website at: http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr Select "Free Subscription" from the menu at the left of the screen. Once you have submitted the required information, weekly issues of MMWR and all new ACIP statements (published as MMWR's "Recommendations and Reports") will arrive automatically by email.
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October 20, 2003
NATIONAL MEDICAL ASSOCIATION PROMOTES FLU SHOTS FOR AFRICAN AMERICANS

Described as the voice of 25,000 African American physicians, the National Medical Association issued a press release on October 7 encouraging everyone, particularly African Americans, to get immunized against influenza this year.

Reporting that the African American community has lower flu immunization rates than other groups, the press release quotes Wilma Wooten, MD, MPH, San Diego Region VI chair of NMA: "There are a lot of people in our community with diabetes or asthma or heart and lung conditions. These conditions put you at extra risk for flu. Immunization levels for African Americans should be as high or higher than any other ethnic group."

To make sure African Americans and others can easily be vaccinated against influenza, the press release offers a website that lets users search by zip code or location for a nearby pharmacy or grocery store that offers immunizations. The site is http://www.findaflushot.com

In partnership with the California Department of Health Services and other organizations, NMA is involved in an advertising and outreach campaign to promote influenza immunization among African Americans. The centerpiece is a full-page, full-color advertisement scheduled for the November issue of "Essence." It features an over-50 African American woman saying, "I celebrate my body, I embrace my future, I honor my health."

To access the complete press release, go to:
http://www.nmanet.org/pr/100703.htm

In addition to the advertising campaign, NMA has established a national minority-focused immunization initiative aimed at promoting a lifetime approach to reducing vaccine-preventable disease. For more information, go to: http://www.nmanet.org/National_Programs_Adult_Immunization.htm or call the NMA national office at (202) 347-1895.

To access the NMA homepage, go to: http://www.nmanet.org
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October 20, 2003
NEW TRANSLATION: SPANISH-LANGUAGE LIVE INTRANASAL INFLUENZA VACCINE VIS NOW ON IAC WEBSITE

Dated 9/4/03, the Spanish-language 2003-2004 live intranasal influenza Vaccine Information Statement (VIS) is now available on the Immunization Action Coalition (IAC) website. IAC gratefully acknowledges the California Department of Health Services for the translation.

To obtain a camera-ready (PDF) copy of the live intranasal influenza VIS in Spanish, go to:
http://www.immunize.org/vis/spliveflu03.pdf

To obtain the VIS in English, go to:
http://www.immunize.org/vis/liveflu03.pdf

For information about the use of VISs, and for VISs in a total of 29 languages, visit IAC's VIS web page at http://www.immunize.org/vis
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October 20, 2003
NATIONAL QUALITY FORUM ENDORSES NEW NATIONAL VOLUNTARY CONSENSUS STANDARDS FOR NURSING HOME PERFORMANCE MEASURES

On October 3, the National Quality Forum issued a press release announcing its endorsement of new Nursing Home Performance Measures. Influenza and pneumococcal vaccination are among the measures that apply to all facilities. Portions of the press release are reprinted below.

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NATIONAL QUALITY FORUM ENDORSES [NEW] NATIONAL VOLUNTARY CONSENSUS STANDARDS FOR NURSING HOME PERFORMANCE MEASURES
October 3, 2003

The National Quality Forum (NQF) today announced the endorsement of its [new] Nursing Home Performance Measures. The report--representing the consensus of nearly 200 hospitals and healthcare systems, consumers groups, professional associations, purchasers, federal agencies, and research and quality improvement organizations--provides a standardized set of performance measures for adult residents in chronic and post-acute care nursing homes.

The primary purpose of the NQF-endorsed measures is to provide information to facilitate consumers' selection of nursing homes. Additionally, the measures may be used by discharge planners and physicians for placement of patients; nursing home providers for internal quality improvement; and policymakers to oversee quality. . . .

The [two new immunization] measures that apply to all facilities are:

  • Pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccination of residents age 65 or older
     
  • Influenza vaccination for all nursing home residents . . . .

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To access the complete press release, go to:
http://www.qualityforum.org/news/prnursinghomevcs10-3-0311hww.pdf
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October 20, 2003
CDC NOTIFIES READERS ABOUT ITS VIRAL HEPATITIS RESOURCE CENTER

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) published "Notice to Readers: CDC Viral Hepatitis Resource Center Offers Free Materials for Health Professionals and the General Public" in the October 17 issue of "Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report" (MMWR). The notice is reprinted below in its entirety.

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Viral hepatitis infections represent a major public health burden in the United States. Persons should understand what viral hepatitis is and what prevention measures they can take to prevent viral hepatitis infections. To help health-care providers and the general public receive the most current, accurate, accessible viral hepatitis prevention messages, CDC has created a Viral Hepatitis Resource Center, available at http://www.cdc.gov/hepatitis The resource center contains educational materials such as brochures, fact sheets, frequently asked questions, slide sets, and posters. All materials are free and can be either downloaded directly or ordered online.

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To obtain the complete text of the notice online, go to:
http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/mm5241a7.htm

To obtain a camera-ready (PDF format) copy of this issue of MMWR, go to:
http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/PDF/wk/mm5241.pdf
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October 20, 2003
CDC NOTIFIES READERS ABOUT THE INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON WOMEN AND INFECTIOUS DISEASES

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) published "Notice to Readers: International Conference on Women and Infectious Diseases" in the October 17 issue of "Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report" (MMWR). The notice is reprinted below in its entirety.

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CDC's National Center for Infectious Diseases in collaboration with numerous partners, is planning the International Conference on Women and Infectious Diseases to be held February 27-28, 2004, in Atlanta, Georgia, at the Atlanta Marriott Marquis. The goal of the conference is to enhance prevention and control of infectious diseases among women worldwide. Featured topics include the impact of globalization, women and human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome, perinatal infectious diseases, vaccinations, and links between infectious and chronic diseases. Other topics include infectious disease disparities, sex-appropriate interventions, effective health communications, and cultural competence in preventing infectious diseases among women. Additional information is available from CDC, telephone (404) 371-5312 or (404) 371-5311. Information about registration is available at http://www.womenshealthconf.org

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To obtain the complete text of the notice online, go to:
http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/mm5241a6.htm

To obtain a camera-ready (PDF format) copy of this issue of MMWR, go to:
http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/PDF/wk/mm5241.pdf
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October 20, 2003
THANK YOU, READERS, FOR FAXING HEADLINES FROM LAST WEEK'S DEAR ABBY COLUMN PROMOTING INFLUENZA VACCINATION

Readers from San Diego, CA, to Rochester, NY, faxed us headlines from Dear Abby's October 14 column. Thank you!

It's helpful to us to see the way various newspapers cast the information the Immunization Action Coalition (IAC) sent to Dear Abby about influenza vaccination and the populations for whom it is recommended or encouraged.

Here are a few of our favorites headlines; the writers used the headlines to help spread the column's key messages:

  • "Flu shots won't give you the flu" (from the Atlanta, GA, "Journal-Constitution")
     
  • "Remember to get flu vaccination--it may save life of a loved one" (from the San Diego, CA, "Union")
     
  • "Flu shot important to protect health of the young and old" (from the Bloomington, IN, "Herald-Times")
     
  • "There's no myth about benefits of flu vaccine" (from the Milwaukee, WI, "Journal-Sentinel")

If you haven't had time to send us the headline from your local paper, please fax or mail it when you can. Our fax number is (651) 647-9131. Our address is Immunization Action Coalition, 1573 Selby Avenue, Suite 234, St. Paul, MN 55104.

To access the column from the Dear Abby website, go to:
http://www.uexpress.com/printable/print.html?uc_full_date=20031014&uc_comic=da
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October 20, 2003
REPORT ON THE FIRST PHASE OF THE IMMUNIZATION COALITION SUSTAINABILITY PROJECT IS COMPLETE AND AVAILABLE ONLINE

Begun in January, the Immunization Coalition Sustainability Project (ICSP) was created to identify effective immunization coalitions and communicate their success to others. To that end, ICSP developed a survey instrument and distributed it to 152 immunization coalitions nationwide.

After receiving completed surveys from 114 coalitions (75 percent of those surveyed), ICSP wrote a report summarizing the project to date and presenting a snap shot of the organizational structure of immunization coalitions that participated in the survey. To access the report, go to:
http://www.bakalianconsulting.com/ICSPPhase1Report_903.pdf

If your coalition did not respond to the survey and would like to, go to: http://www.bakalianconsulting.com and click on the button "click here to register your coalition."

For additional information, email Pat Bakalian or Lucinda L.W. Connelly at info@bakalianconsulting.com

To view the Immunization Action Coalition's online database of immunization coalitions, go to: http://www.izcoalitions.org

 

Immunization Action Coalition1573 Selby AvenueSt. Paul MN 55104
E-mail: admin@immunize.org Web: http://www.immunize.org/
Tel: (651) 647-9009Fax: (651) 647-9131

This page was updated on October 20, 2003