Immunization Action Coalition and the Hepatitis B Coalition

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Issue Number 303            March 25, 2002

CONTENTS OF THIS ISSUE

  1. CDC publishes progress report on reduction of Haemophilus influenzae type b disease
  2. Get ready for National Infant Immunization Week April 14-20!
  3. WHO website lists country-by-country immunization schedules
  4. New VIS translations: Thai and Ilokano Vaccine Information Statements are now on IAC's website
  5. NIH hosts Consensus Development Conference: Management of Hepatitis C June 10-12 in Bethesda
  6. Immunization Registry Conference will take place October 28-30 in Philadelphia

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March 25, 2002
CDC PUBLISHES PROGRESS REPORT ON REDUCTION OF HAEMOPHILUS INFLUENZAE TYPE B DISEASE

On March 22, 2002, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) published "Progress Toward Elimination of Haemophilus influenzae Type b Invasive Disease Among Infants and Children--United States, 1998-2000" in the Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report (MMWR).

The CDC synopsis of the report reads as follows:

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Before effective vaccines became available in the U.S., Hib was the leading cause of bacterial meningitis and other serious diseases among children <5 years of age. Compared with incidence from the pre-vaccine era, by 1996, due to the widespread use of Hib conjugate vaccines, the incidence of Hib invasive disease among children <5 years of age declined by >99%. During 1998-2000, the national incidence of Hib invasive disease among children <5 years of age remained low. However,  illness and death associated with the Hib bacteria occurred mostly among young infants who have not  completed the 2-dose (given at 2 and 4 months of age) or 3-dose (given at 2, 4, and 6 months of age)  primary series of Hib vaccination, and unvaccinated or under-vaccinated older children. Cases that occurred in children who had been old enough to complete the primary Hib vaccination series might have been preventable.

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To obtain the complete text of the article online, go to:
http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/mm5111a4.htm

To obtain a camera-ready (PDF format) copy of this issue of MMWR, go to:
http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/PDF/wk/mm5111.pdf

HOW TO OBTAIN A FREE ELECTRONIC SUBSCRIPTION TO THE MMWR:
To obtain a free electronic subscription to the "Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report" (MMWR), visit CDC's MMWR website at: http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr Select "Free MMWR Subscription" from the menu at the left of the screen. Once you have submitted the required information, weekly issues of the  MMWR and all new ACIP statements (published as MMWR's "Recommendations and Reports") will arrive automatically by email.
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March 25, 2002
GET READY FOR NATIONAL INFANT IMMUNIZATION WEEK APRIL 14-20!

National Infant Immunization Week (NIIW) is just three weeks away! The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has issued a notice to encourage health care providers and consumer groups to get involved. The CDC website provides ideas and materials for NIIW events.

The entire NIIW notice reads as follows:

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Now in its ninth year, National Infant Immunization Week (NIIW), April 14-20, 2002, is an annual observance focusing attention on the benefits of immunizations to the health of children. NIIW provides an opportunity to highlight the positive impact immunization makes on the lives of infants and children and call attention to national, state, and community immunization achievements. Ultimately, our nation's success in achieving high levels of childhood immunization coverage is the result of the work that  individual health care professionals, local and state health departments, and other partners do throughout the year. NIIW provides an opportunity to recognize these contributions and to remind parents, caregivers, health care providers and others of the continuous need to follow childhood  immunization recommendations in order to protect children against vaccine-preventable diseases and give them a healthy start to life.

At the national level, CDC is producing a 30-second-long Spanish-language public service advertisement, Momentos Preciosos (Milestones), which will be distributed to 120 Spanish-language television stations in the top 50 Hispanic media markets in conjunction with NIIW. CDC will also be participating in NIIW events throughout the country.

However, every individual and community, large and small, can play a vital role in protecting children from vaccine-preventable diseases. Some suggestions for you as a parent, as a health care provider or as a community leader could include:

COMMUNITY

Harness the power of the community by bringing together local groups, organizations, businesses, hospitals, churches, providers and political leaders to plan local NIIW activities, including health fairs, special events, news conferences or other activities that will interest the media and draw public attention.

Ask your governor or mayor to sign a proclamation for NIIW.

Organize a door-to-door education campaign to raise awareness about the importance of timely immunization.

Ask local businesses for donations of money or in-kind gifts. The funds can be used for brochures, flyers, posters, billboards and other educational materials. Certificates to fast food restaurants or other local businesses can be used as incentives.

HEALTH CARE PROVIDERS

Obtain or develop patient-education materials for your patients.

Establish a simple, inexpensive immunization reminder system.

Encourage hospitals and health maintenance organizations to promote immunization in prenatal classes and during prenatal visits.

Participate in in-service training seminars at medical, health and social service agencies on record-keeping, eliminating access barriers, and reminder-recall systems.

Encourage local hospitals to do a grand rounds program on immunizations.

PARENTS AND CAREGIVERS

Work with local health departments, clinics and hospitals to promote neighborhood clinics.

Write an article or op-ed piece for the local newspaper.

Encourage schools, churches, libraries, hospitals, and other groups to print articles in newsletters, post notices on bulletin boards and make special announcements.

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The CDC has posted 2002 NIIW Materials on its website. These include materials and ideas for creating an NIIW event, printable posters, and a flyer.

For more information about NIIW and NIIW materials, go to:
http://www.cdc.gov/nip/publications/niiw/default.htm

For the camera-ready (PDF format) NIIW flyer, go to:
http://www.cdc.gov/nip/publications/niiw/02/02flyr.pdf
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March 25, 2002
WHO WEBSITE LISTS COUNTRY-BY-COUNTRY IMMUNIZATION SCHEDULES

The Department of Vaccines and Biologicals Vaccine Assessment and Monitoring Team within the World Health Organization (WHO) has created a "Country Profiles" page on the WHO website. For  each country, information is given on population characteristics, number of reported cases of vaccine-preventable diseases, reported percent of target population vaccinated against specific antigens, immunization indicators, and immunization schedules. Simply scroll down the list of countries, highlight a country, and click on the "OK with the selection" bar at the bottom of the window.

This is a convenient resource to remember next time you are trying to assess the vaccination history and status of a patient who was born in another country.

To use the WHO Vaccine Preventable Diseases Monitoring System 2001 Global Summary, go to:
http://www-nt.who.int/vaccines/globalsummary/Immunization/CountryProfileSelect.cfm

For more information, contact the WHO Vaccine Assessment and Monitoring Team by email at Epidata@who.int or fax at (011) 41-22-791-4227.
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March 25, 2002
NEW VIS TRANSLATIONS: THAI AND ILOKANO VACCINE INFORMATION STATEMENTS ARE NOW ON IAC'S WEBSITE

IAC now offers Vaccine Information Statements (VISs) in 27 different languages. We have just added all 13 VISs in the Thai language and 8 VISs in the Ilokano language, which is spoken in the Philippines, to our website.

IAC thanks the Asian Pacific Health Care Venture for providing the Thai translations and the Hawaii Department of Health for providing the Ilokano translations.

Following are links to VISs in Thai by vaccine:

Anthrax: http://www.immunize.org/vis/th_ant00.pdf
Varicella: http://www.immunize.org/vis/th_var98.pdf
DTaP: http://www.immunize.org/vis/thdtap01.pdf
Hib: http://www.immunize.org/vis/th_hib98.pdf
Hepatitis A: http://www.immunize.org/vis/th_hpa98.pdf
Hepatitis B: http://www.immunize.org/vis/th_hpb01.pdf
Influenza: http://www.immunize.org/vis/th_flu00.pdf
MMR: http://www.immunize.org/vis/th_mmr98.pdf
Meningococcal: http://www.immunize.org/vis/th_men00.pdf
Pneumococcal conjugate (PCV7): http://www.immunize.org/vis/thpnPCV7.pdf
Pneumococcal polysaccharide (PPV23): http://www.immunize.org/vis/th_pne97.pdf
Polio: http://www.immunize.org/vis/th_pol00.pdf
Td: http://www.immunize.org/vis/th_td94.pdf

Following are links to VISs in Ilokano by vaccine:

Varicella: http://www.immunize.org/vis/il_var98.pdf
DTaP: http://www.immunize.org/vis/ildtap01.pdf
Hib: http://www.immunize.org/vis/il_hib98.pdf
Hepatitis B: http://www.immunize.org/vis/il_hpb01.pdf
Influenza: http://www.immunize.org/vis/il_flu01.pdf
MMR: http://www.immunize.org/vis/ilmmr98.pdf
Polio: http://www.immunize.org/vis/il_pol00.pdf
Td: http://www.immunize.org/vis/il_td94.pdf

To see IAC's entire list of VISs by language, go to:
http://www.immunize.org/vis/index.htm#index
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March 25, 2002
NIH HOSTS CONSENSUS DEVELOPMENT CONFERENCE: MANAGEMENT OF HEPATITIS C JUNE 10-12 IN BETHESDA

The National Institutes of Health (NIH) will convene a Consensus Development Conference on Management of Hepatitis C from Monday, June 10 through the morning of Wednesday, June 12 at the Natcher Conference Center in Bethesda, Maryland. The first such conference was held in March 1997, three years after the identification of hepatitis C viral infection.

During the first day and a half of the conference, experts will present the latest hepatitis C research findings to an independent panel. After weighing the evidence, the panel will draft a statement addressing questions such as: What is the most appropriate approach to diagnose and monitor patients? What is the most effective therapy for hepatitis C? The panel chairperson will read the draft statement on the last day of the conference and invite comments and questions.

For more information and to register online, go to:
http://consensus.nih.gov/news/upcoming/hepc/hepc_info.htm

You can also register by email to hepc@prospectassoc.com with your complete name, mailing address, and phone number (also include the name of the conference in your message); by phone at (301) 592-3320; or fax at (301) 593-9433.

To learn about other conferences and seminars related to immunization and hepatitis B, visit IAC's online Calendar of Events at: http://www.immunize.org/calendar/
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March 25, 2002
IMMUNIZATION REGISTRY CONFERENCE WILL TAKE PLACE OCTOBER 28-30 IN PHILADELPHIA

The 2002 Immunization Registry Conference will be held Monday, October 28 through Wednesday, October 30 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. With the theme "Grow, Connect, Protect," this conference provides participants with an opportunity to share knowledge and information about the development and use of immunization registries.

Topic areas for abstracts include registry marketing, WIC linkage, and sentinel site information. The deadline for abstracts is May 30.

To register or submit an abstract online, go to:
http://www.cdc.gov/nip/registry/irc2002.htm

For more information, call the Conference Planning Team at (404) 639-8539 or contact Gregory Lanman, Program Analyst, by email at ghl2@cdc.gov

 

Immunization Action Coalition1573 Selby AvenueSt. Paul MN 55104
E-mail: admin@immunize.org Web: http://www.immunize.org/
Tel: (651) 647-9009Fax: (651) 647-9131

This page was updated on March 25, 2002