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Immunization Action Coalition

IAC Express 2011

Issue number 940: July 5, 2011

Please click here to subscribe to IAC Express as well as other FREE IAC periodicals.
Contents of this Issue
Select a title to jump to the article.
  1. Spotlight on immunize.org: new home page and website design coming soon
  2. New: Spanish-language version of the 2011 U.S. child/teen immunization schedule available from CDC
  3. IAC's Video of the Week features Dr. Paul Offit discussing the history of the anti-vaccine movement
  4. CDC publishes report on multiple cases of measles after exposure during air travel in Australia and New Zealand
  5. Current Issues in Vaccines webinar, featuring Dr. Paul Offit, is available through August 23
  6. CDC's "Immunization Update 2011" live satellite broadcast and webcast scheduled for August 4
  7. CDC's "Epidemiology and Prevention of Vaccine-Preventable Diseases 2011" course now available in web-on-demand and DVD formats
  8. View a panel discussion about ACIP's decision-making process on vaccine recommendations in the context of cost-effectiveness data and a vaccine's value to society. Video is now streaming online.
  9. "CDC Features" encourages parents to make sure their children are up to date on their measles (and other) vaccinations
  10. June issue of CDC's Immunization Works email newsletter includes articles on global immunizations and more
  11. VISs for MMRV, yellow fever, and anthrax vaccines available in additional languages
  12. IAC's popular laminated versions of the 2011 U.S. immunization schedules are available. Order a supply for your workplace today!
  13. Award-winning DVD! "Immunization Techniques: Best Practices with Infants, Children, and Adults"--from the California Department of Public Health, Immunization Branch
  14. July 8 webinar is your chance to offer your ideas on the Division of Viral Hepatitis's national education campaign
  15. CDC publishes update on worldwide outbreaks of vaccine-derived poliovirus during July 2009-March 2011
 
Abbreviations
AAFP, American Academy of Family Physicians; AAP, American Academy of Pediatrics; ACIP, Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices; AMA, American Medical Association; CDC, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention; FDA, Food and Drug Administration; IAC, Immunization Action Coalition; MMWR, Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report; NCIRD, National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases; NIVS, National Influenza Vaccine Summit; VIS, Vaccine Information Statement; VPD, vaccine-preventable disease; WHO, World Health Organization.
  
Issue 940: July 5, 2011
1.  Spotlight on immunize.org: new home page and website design coming soon

Heads up! Next week, we will launch a new website design for www.immunize.org. The newly designed website offers you a deeper and broader experience through improved design and navigation, making it faster and easier for you to find the essential information you want and have come to expect from IAC.

Many of the changes to the home page reflect suggestions we have received from our website visitors. Please continue to provide comments and suggestions on what you like about www.immunize.org and what you would like to see in future redesign efforts. Be sure to visit www.immunize.org next week!
 
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2 New: Spanish-language version of the 2011 U.S. child/teen immunization schedule available from CDC

CDC recently posted a Spanish-language version of the Recommended Immunization Schedules for Persons Aged 0 Through 18 Years--United States, 2011. It contains recommendations for people ages 0 through 6 years and people ages 7 through 18 years, as well as a catch-up schedule for people ages 0 through 18 years who start immunizations late or are more than one month behind.

To access the Spanish-language Recommended Immunization Schedules for Persons Aged 0 Through 18 Years--United States, 2011, go to: http://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/recs/schedules/downloads/child/0-18yrs-and-catchup-spanish.pdf

To access other versions of the Recommended Immunization Schedules for Persons Aged 0 Through 18 Years--United States, 2011, go to: http://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/recs/schedules/child-schedule.htm#hcp

NOTE: CDC no longer offers a Spanish-language version of the recommended immunization schedule for adults.
 
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3 IAC's Video of the Week features Dr. Paul Offit discussing the history of the anti-vaccine movement

IAC encourages IAC Express readers to watch a 21-minute video of Paul Offit, MD, being interviewed about the history of the anti-vaccine movement. Dr. Offit is chief, Division of Infectious Diseases, Children's Hospital of Philadelphia. The interviewer, Eli Adashi, MD, is professor of medical science, Warren Alpert Medical School, Brown University.

The video will be available on the home page of IAC's website through July 10. To access it, go to: http://www.immunize.org and click on the image under the words Video of the Week. Viewing this video requires login, which is free.

Remember to bookmark IAC's home page to view a new video every Monday.

To access the archives of IAC's Videos of the Week, go to: http://www.immunize.org/votw
 
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4 CDC publishes report on multiple cases of measles after exposure during air travel in Australia and New Zealand

CDC published "Notes from the Field: Multiple Cases of Measles After Exposure During Air Travel--Australia and New Zealand, January 2011" in the July 1 issue of MMWR. The article is reprinted below in its entirety, excluding references.


In January 2011, measles was diagnosed in three New Zealand residents recently returned from a 17-day trip to Singapore and the Philippines. On January 11, they had flown on a 7.5-hour flight from Singapore to Brisbane, Australia, remained in a transit lounge for 9.5 hours, and then continued on a 4-hour flight to Auckland, New Zealand. Searches in Australia and New Zealand for secondary cases among passengers on either flight resulted in the identification of three cases among passengers on the Singapore-to-Brisbane flight and five cases among passengers on the Brisbane-to-Auckland flight.

The three index cases had rash onsets occurring January 11-15 and tested positive for measles immunoglobulin M (IgM). One Australian case and one New Zealand case were diagnosed clinically, but the remaining six secondary cases, with rash onsets occurring January 21-26, were positive for measles RNA by nucleic acid amplification testing. Each specimen was genotype D9 with the same genetic sequence. Only three of the eight secondary cases were in persons seated within two rows of a person with an index case: two in unvaccinated persons and one in a person whose measles vaccination status was unknown. One secondary case was in a person of unknown vaccination status seated four rows away from the nearest person with an index case, one was in a person with a history of having been vaccinated against measles twice who was seated six rows away, and three were in unvaccinated children 11 rows away, in a separate cabin. The three index cases were in unvaccinated children aged 12-17 years.

Australian contact investigation guidelines for exposure to a single passenger with infectious measles aboard an aircraft focus on the seats within two rows of persons with index cases; five of the eight secondary cases in this outbreak were in persons who were farther away. Three persons likely were infectious aboard the aircraft, not one, and recent literature suggests that exposure might extend farther than two rows. In addition, because measles is readily transmissible through airborne transmission, the opportunity for exposure existed in the Jetways, the arrival and departure terminals, and the transit lounge. This outbreak highlights the transmissibility of measles and the risk for exposure during international travel, which might start at the airport before departure, and the need for travelers to be protected against measles by vaccination.


To access the full article, go to: http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/mm6025a4.htm
 
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5 Current Issues in Vaccines webinar, featuring Dr. Paul Offit, is available through August 23

On May 25, the Vaccine Education Center (VEC) at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) and the Pennsylvania chapter of the American Academy of Pediatrics held their first Vaccine Update webinar. The speaker was Paul Offit, MD, chief, Infectious Diseases Division, CHOP, and director, VEC. Topics covered include pertussis, febrile seizures following vaccination, influenza, and recent anti-vaccine activity.

An archived copy of the webinar is available until midnight (Eastern time) August 23, 2011. It has a run time of 54 minutes.

To view the webinar online, go to: http://vaccine.chop.edu/webinars Scroll down to the subhead titled "Current Issues in Vaccines--Spring 2011." Click on the link titled "View an archived copy of the presentation." Click the "Launch Webcast" button on the next screen.
 
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6 CDC's "Immunization Update 2011" live satellite broadcast and webcast scheduled for August 4

The live satellite broadcast and webcast "Immunization Update 2011" is scheduled at two times on August 4. The first time is from 9AM to 11:30AM ET; the rebroadcast is from 12 noon to 2:30PM ET. Both will feature a live question-and-answer session in which participants nationwide can interact with the course instructors by email and fax.

Anticipated topics include influenza, meningococcal, zoster, Tdap, and human papillomavirus vaccines. Other emerging issues will be discussed, including the latest information from ACIP's June 2011 meeting. The course instructors are Andrew Kroger, MD, MPH; Donna Weaver, RN, MN; and JoEllen Wolicki, BSN, RN. All are with NCIRD at CDC.

The broadcasts will be edited and made available as a self-study program 4 to 6 weeks after the broadcast. The program will be available in DVD and web-on-demand formats.

Course registration begins on July 7. To register, go to: http://www2a.cdc.gov/TCEOnline Registration is not required to view the webcast.

To view a fact sheet with comprehensive information, click here.
 
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7 CDC's "Epidemiology and Prevention of Vaccine-Preventable Diseases 2011" course now available in web-on-demand and DVD formats

The "Epidemiology and Prevention of Vaccine-Preventable Diseases 2011" course is now available as a ten-module web-on-demand series. Updated annually to provide the latest recommendations from the ACIP, the course presents the most current information in the constantly changing field of immunization. Each of the ten modules has a run time of 60 to 90 minutes and includes case studies and a discussion of frequently asked questions. Continuing education is available.

For more information on the course, or to access the web-on-demand version, go to: http://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/ed/epivac

To order one free copy of the DVD using the NCIRD ordering system, go to: http://wwwn.cdc.gov/pubs/NCIRD.aspx Scroll down to item #22-0771.
 
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8 View a panel discussion about ACIP's decision-making process on vaccine recommendations in the context of cost-effectiveness data and a vaccine's value to society. Video is now streaming online.

On June 29 five panelists met to discuss ACIP's decision-making process on vaccine recommendations in the context of cost-effectiveness data and a vaccine's value to society. The panel met at the American Enterprise Institute, Washington, DC.

The panelists are
  • David Curry, Center for Vaccine Ethics and Policy
  • Adel Mahmoud, MD, Princeton University
  • Leslie Norwalk, formerly with the U.S. Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services
  • Mark Pauly, Wharton School, University of Pennsylvania
  • William Schaffner, MD, National Foundation for Infectious Diseases and Vanderbilt University School of Medicine

To access a streaming video of the panel discussion, go to: http://www.aei.org/video/101473

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9 "CDC Features" encourages parents to make sure their children are up to date on their measles (and other) vaccinations

The "CDC Features" web section now includes information for the public on the importance of protecting children from measles and other vaccine-preventable diseases by vaccinating them on time.

To access "Measles: Make Sure Your Child Is Fully Immunized," go to: http://www.cdc.gov/Features/Measles
 
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10.  June issue of CDC's Immunization Works email newsletter includes articles on global immunizations and more

CDC recently released the June issue of its monthly newsletter Immunization Works and posted it on the website of the National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases (NCIRD). The newsletter offers the immunization community information about current topics. The information is in the public domain and can be reproduced and circulated widely.

Most articles in the June Immunization Works newsletter have been covered in this or previous issues of IAC Express. Following are titles of three articles that appear in the June issue under the subhead Global Immunizations; previous issues of IAC Express have not covered these articles.
  • Measles Partner Meeting
  • Best Practices Meeting for WHO Regional Risk Assessments
  • African Region--Training on Bacterial Meningitis and Rotavirus Gastroenteritis

To access the full text of these three articles, as well as the complete June issue of Immunization Works, go to: http://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/news/newsltrs/imwrks/2011/201106.htm

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11.  VISs for MMRV, yellow fever, and anthrax vaccines available in additional languages

The VIS for the measles-mumps-rubella-varicella (MMRV) vaccine is now available in Armenian, Farsi, and Russian. The VIS for yellow fever vaccine is now available in Chinese, Spanish, Tagalog, and Vietnamese. The VIS for anthrax vaccine is now available in Spanish. IAC gratefully acknowledges the California Department of Public Health, Immunization Branch, for the translations.

To access the new translations of the VIS for MMRV vaccine, as well as other translations, go to: http://www.immunize.org/vis/vis_mmrv.asp

To access the new translations of the VIS for yellow fever vaccine, as well as the English version, go to: http://www.immunize.org/vis/vis_yellow_fever.asp

To access the new translation of the VIS for anthrax vaccine, as well as the English version, go to: http://www.immunize.org/vis/vis_anthrax.asp

For information about the use of VISs, and for VISs in more than 35 languages, visit IAC's VIS web section at http://www.immunize.org/vis
 
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12.  IAC's popular laminated versions of the 2011 U.S. immunization schedules are available. Order a supply for your workplace today!

IAC's laminated versions of the 2011 U.S. child/teen and adult immunization schedules are covered with a tough, washable coating that lets them stand up to a year's worth of use in every area of your workplace where immunizations are given. Each has six pages (i.e., three double-sided pages) and is folded to measure 8.5" by 11".

Laminated schedules are printed in color for easy reading, come complete with essential tables and footnotes, and include contraindications and precautions--a feature that will help you make an on-the-spot determination about the safety of vaccinating patients of any age.

PRICING
1-4 copies: $7.50 each
5-19 copies: $5.50 each
20-99 copies: $4.50 each

To view images of the laminated schedules, or to order online or download an order form, go to: http://www.immunize.org/shop/laminated-schedules.asp

For quotes on customizing or placing orders in excess of 999 schedules, call (651) 647-9009 or email admininfo@immunize.org

To learn about other essential immunization resources available for purchase from IAC, go to: http://www.immunize.org/shop
 
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13.  Award-winning DVD! "Immunization Techniques: Best Practices with Infants, Children, and Adults"--from the California Department of Public Health, Immunization Branch

The California Department of Public Health (CDPH), Immunization Branch, has updated its award-winning training video, "Immunization Techniques: Best Practices with Infants, Children, and Adults." The 25-minute program can be used to train new employees and to refresh the skills of experienced staff. The video demonstrates the skills and techniques needed to administer vaccines to patients of all ages.

Prices start at $17 each for 1-9 copies and are greatly reduced for large orders, dropping to $3 each for 1,000-1,499 copies.

To learn more about the DVD, and find out how to order it, go to: http://www.immunize.org/shop/toolkit_iztechdvd.asp

For quotes on larger quantities, call (651) 647-9009 or email admininfo@immunize.org

The Immunization Action Coalition is the only nationwide vendor of this new DVD.

Note for healthcare settings located in California: Contact your local health department immunization program for a free copy.
 
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14.  July 8 webinar is your chance to offer your ideas on the Division of Viral Hepatitis's national education campaign

CDC's Division of Viral Hepatitis (DVH) has scheduled a 1-hour webinar beginning at 1PM ET on July 8. Sponsored by the National Alliance of State & Territorial AIDS Directors and National Viral Hepatitis Roundtable, the webinar is intended to get feedback on DVH's national education campaign. The campaign's focus is on educating providers and consumers about chronic hepatitis B and C, and increasing the identification of those who don't know they are infected. The webinar provides those who work in viral hepatitis prevention and control the opportunity to learn about DVH's plans and join the discussion to improve this effort.

Everyone involved in viral hepatitis prevention and control is invited, including community-based organizations, nonprofits, health departments, and others. To find out more and to register, go to: https://cc.readytalk.com/cc/schedule/display.do?udc=lvi29eal6ij5
 
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15.  CDC publishes update on worldwide outbreaks of vaccine-derived poliovirus during July 2009-March 2011

CDC published "Update on Vaccine-Derived Polioviruses--Worldwide, July 2009-March 2011" in the July 1 issue of MMWR. A press summary of the article is reprinted below.


This report describes countries in which vaccine-derived polioviruses outbreaks were identified during July 2009 to March 2011. Vaccine-derived polioviruses (VDPVs), recognized by their high genetic divergence from the oral poliovirus vaccine (OPV) strains, fall into three categories: (1) circulating VDPVs (cVDPVs) from outbreaks, (2) primary immunodeficiency-associated VDPVs (iVDPVs) from patients with defects in antibody production, and (3) ambiguous VDPVs (aVDPVs) for which there is insufficient evidence for definitive assignment to the other two categories. During July 2009-March 2011, three new cVDPV outbreaks, were identified in Afghanistan, Ethiopia, and India; three previously identified outbreaks in Nigeria, Democratic Republic of Congo, and Somalia continued into 2011; two countries experienced importations of cVDPVs from Nigeria; nine persons were newly found to excrete iVDPVs; and aVDPVs were found among persons and environmental samples in 15 countries. Most of the recent VDPVs were of serotype 2. Current and past experience underscores the importance of routine vaccination either with inactivated poliovirus vaccine or trivalent oral polio vaccine (tOPV) to prevent VDPV spread.


To access the full article, go to: http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/mm6025a3.htm
 
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Immunization Action Coalition  •  Saint Paul, MN
tel 651-647-9009  •  fax 651-647-9131
 
This website is supported in part by a cooperative agreement from the National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases (Grant No. 5U38IP000290) at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in Atlanta, GA. The website content is the sole responsibility of IAC and does not necessarily represent the official views of CDC.