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Immunization Action Coalition

IAC Express 2011

Issue number 919: March 21, 2011

Please click here to subscribe to IAC Express as well as other FREE IAC periodicals.
Contents of this Issue
Select a title to jump to the article.
  1. "Vaccines and Your Child"--a new book to help parents separate fact from fiction
  2. Webinar on addressing parents' concerns about vaccines now available for viewing online
  3. MMWR publishes erratum related to the recommended schedule for people ages 7-18 years
  4. IAC develops new handout that can help individuals understand decisions in the Omnibus Autism Proceeding
  5. Spotlight on immunize.org: where you'll find hundreds of images/photos related to vaccination and vaccine-preventable diseases
  6. IAC's Video of the Week features Dr. Paul Offit discussing the BMJ disclosure of Andrew Wakefield's fraudulent research
  7. CDC offers user-friendly childhood vaccination schedule for parents
  8. Comments solicited on draft federal report about adult immunization
  9. CDC website posts presentation slide sets from the February ACIP meeting
  10. IAC updates "Hib: Questions and Answers" and "Polio: Questions and Answers"
  11. CDC corrects Binational Immunization Resource
  12. CDC's Division of Viral Hepatitis offers new posters
  13. Influenza vaccination is recommended for almost everyone, so please keep vaccinating!
  14. MMWR reports on progress toward interrupting wild poliovirus circulation in countries with reestablished transmission
  15. MMWR reports on polio outbreak in Republic of the Congo
  16. Award-winning DVD! "Immunization Techniques: Best Practices with Infants, Children, and Adults"--from the California Department of Public Health, Immunization Branch
  17. Minnesota Coalition for Adult Immunization's 20th annual conference to be held April 8
  18. 2011 Ohio Immunization Conference scheduled for May 13 in Cleveland
 
Abbreviations
AAFP, American Academy of Family Physicians; AAP, American Academy of Pediatrics; ACIP, Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices; AMA, American Medical Association; CDC, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention; FDA, Food and Drug Administration; IAC, Immunization Action Coalition; MMWR, Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report; NCIRD, National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases; NIVS, National Influenza Vaccine Summit; VIS, Vaccine Information Statement; VPD, vaccine-preventable disease; WHO, World Health Organization.
  
Issue 919: March 21, 2011
1.  "Vaccines and Your Child"--a new book to help parents separate fact from fiction

Paul Offit, MD, and Charlotte Moser, both with the Vaccine Education Center, Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, have published a new book for parents. "Vaccines and Your Child--Separating Fact from Fiction" answers questions parents may have about how vaccines work, how they are made, and how they are tested. Most importantly, the authors separate the real risks of vaccines from feared, but unfounded, risks.

"Vaccines and Your Child" can be purchased from your local bookstore, your favorite online site, or from the publisher, Columbia University Press, at http://www.cup.columbia.edu/book/978-0-231-15307-2/vaccines-and-your-child

 
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2 Webinar on addressing parents' concerns about vaccines now available for viewing online

A Nurse Training on Immunization Project webinar that first aired on March 9 is now available to view online. The title of the presentation is "Addressing Parents' Concerns about Vaccines" and the presenter is Gary Marshall, MD, Professor of Pediatrics, University of Louisville School of Medicine. The program is sponsored by the School of Public Health, University at Albany, State University of New York.

To access this information webinar, go to:
https://nysdoh.webex.com/tc0500l/trainingcenter/record/downloadViewAction.do?
actionType=view&recordId=46995662&siteurl=nysdoh&setted=103

The password required to watch the video is vaccine02.
 
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3 MMWR publishes erratum related to the recommended schedule for people ages 7-18 years

CDC published "Errata: Vol. 60, No. 5" in the March 18 issue of MMWR. The first paragraph follows.


In "Recommended Immunization Schedules for Persons Aged 0 Through 18 Years--United States, 2011," an error occurred on page 3, in Figure 2, "Recommended immunization schedule for persons aged 7 through 18 years--United States, 2011." In that figure, the green bar indicating the range of recommended ages for catch-up immunization with the "MMR Series" should have extended across all three age ranges: 7-10 years, 11-12 years, and 13-18 years. The corrected figure is below.


To access the complete text of the erratum, including the figure, go to: http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/mm6010a6.htm
 
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4 IAC develops new handout that can help individuals understand decisions in the Omnibus Autism Proceeding

IAC recently developed a new handout to help patients and healthcare professionals understand the claims and rulings in the Omnibus Autism Proceeding. The Omnibus Autism Proceeding--similar to a class-action lawsuit--examined more than 5,000 claims filed between 1999 and 2007 under the National Vaccine Injury Compensation Program in which parents claimed that vaccines had caused their children's autism. In 2007 and 2008, three Special Masters heard test cases related to two theories of causation, and in 2009 and 2010 the Special Masters rejected all the petitioners' causation theories.

To access "Decisions in the Omnibus Autism Proceeding," go to: http://www.immunize.org/catg.d/p4029.pdf

IAC's Handouts for Patients and Staff web section offers healthcare professionals and the public approximately 250 FREE English-language handouts (many also available in translation), which we encourage website users to print out, copy, and distribute widely. To access all of IAC's free handouts, go to: http://www.immunize.org/handouts
 
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5 Spotlight on immunize.org: where you'll find hundreds of images/photos related to vaccination and vaccine-preventable diseases

Looking for new ways to educate your patients about the importance of vaccination? Look no further. When it comes to educating healthcare professionals and the public about the serious health effects of vaccine-preventable diseases (VPDs), nothing else packs the punch of a visual image--and the IAC Image Library web section provides access to hundreds of VPD and vaccination-related images.

IAC has brought together images of photos of people suffering from VPDs; pictures of healthcare professionals vaccinating children, teens, and adults; and photos taken during various global immunization campaigns, as well as pathology specimens and micrographs of viruses and bacteria. The majority of images are free to download and can be used in lectures, articles, and presentations.

Additionally, the IAC Image Library provides links to the CDC's Public Health Image Library; the American Academy of Pediatrics' photo collection of children suffering from VPDs; and archival images from the History of Medicine Division of the U.S. Library of Medicine.

To access the IAC Image Library, visit: http://www.immunize.org/photos

 
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6 IAC's Video of the Week features Dr. Paul Offit discussing the BMJ disclosure of Andrew Wakefield's fraudulent research

IAC encourages IAC Express readers to watch a 2.15-minute video that features Paul Offit, MD, discussing the recent articles in the BMJ about Andrew Wakefield's fraudulent research on MMR vaccine.

The video will be available on the home page of IAC's website through March 27. To access it, go to: http://www.immunize.org and click on the image under the words Video of the Week.

Remember to bookmark IAC's home page to view a new video every Monday. To view an IAC Video of the Week from the past, go to the video archive at http://www.immunize.org/votw
 
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7 CDC offers user-friendly childhood vaccination schedule for parents

In conjunction with the American Academy of Family Physicians and the American Academy of Pediatrics, CDC has developed a colorful and user-friendly immunization schedule for parents of children ages birth through 6 years. A second page offers a nice summary of the diseases the vaccines protect against.

To access this new resource, go to: http://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/spec-grps/infants/downloads/parent-ver-sch-0-6yrs.pdf
 
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8 Comments solicited on draft federal report about adult immunization

The Adult Immunization Working Group of the National Vaccine Advisory Committee (NVAC) has developed a draft report and recommendations for the consideration of NVAC. Individuals and organizations are encouraged to submit comments on the draft report and recommendations by 5:00PM ET on April 15, 2011.

To access the draft report and recommendations, go to: http://www.hhs.gov/nvpo/nvac/subgroups/adultimmunization.html Information about how to submit comments can be found on the same page.
 
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9 CDC website posts presentation slide sets from the February ACIP meeting

The CDC website recently posted the PowerPoint slide sets presented at the February 23-24 ACIP meeting. To access the slide sets, go to: http://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/recs/acip/slides-feb11.htm
 
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10.  IAC updates "Hib: Questions and Answers" and "Polio: Questions and Answers"

IAC recently made minor revisions to "Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib): Questions & Answers" and "Polio: Questions and Answers," two handouts for patients and parents.

To access "Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib): Questions & Answers," go to: http://www.immunize.org/catg.d/p4206.pdf

To access "Polio: Questions and Answers," go to: http://www.immunize.org/catg.d/p4215.pdf

To access a table with links to IAC's Q&A handouts for each vaccine, go to: http://www.immunize.org/handouts/vaccine-questions.asp

IAC's Handouts for Patients and Staff web section offers healthcare professionals and the public approximately 250 FREE English-language handouts (many also available in translation), which we encourage website users to print out, copy, and distribute widely. To access all of IAC's free handouts, go to: http://www.immunize.org/handouts
 
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11.  CDC corrects Binational Immunization Resource

CDC recently corrected its Binational Immunization Resource, a side-by-side presentation of vaccines recommended by Mexico and the United States. The resource helps healthcare providers identify vaccines needed by children who are now in the U.S. and who received some vaccines in Mexico.

The changes involved removing Trihibit as it is no longer produced in the U.S., and correcting the recommended months for Pentacel administration (18 months had been inadvertently omitted).

To access the corrected resource, go to: http://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/recs/schedules/downloads/child/binational-schedule-pr.pdf
 
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12.  CDC's Division of Viral Hepatitis offers new posters

CDC's Division of Viral Hepatitis has made new viral hepatitis educational posters available for order. To view the offerings, go to http://wwwn.cdc.gov/pubs/hepa.aspx and scroll down to the poster section.
 
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13.  Influenza vaccination is recommended for almost everyone, so please keep vaccinating!

Influenza vaccination is recommended for everyone age 6 months and older, so please keep vaccinating your patients.

If you don't have influenza vaccine, you can direct patients to the Google Flu Vaccine Finder. It helps the public find nearby locations where influenza vaccine is available. It's as simple as entering a zip code. Visit the Google Flu Vaccine Finder: http://www.google.com/flushot

To purchase supplies of influenza vaccine, visit IVATS, the Influenza Vaccine Availability Tracking System. IVATS is operated by the National Influenza Vaccine Summit and provides information about vaccine manufacturers and distributors who have influenza vaccine available for purchase. To access IVATS, go to: http://www.preventinfluenza.org/ivats

Following is a list of resources related to influenza disease and vaccination for healthcare professionals and the public.

To access IAC's handouts related to influenza, including screening questionnaires, patient education pieces, and sample standing orders, go to: http://www.immunize.org/handouts/influenza-vaccines.asp

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14.  MMWR reports on progress toward interrupting wild poliovirus circulation in countries with reestablished transmission

CDC published "Progress Toward Interrupting Wild Poliovirus Circulation in Countries With Reestablished Transmission--Africa, 2009-2010" in the March 18 issue of MMWR. A summary made available to the press is reprinted below.


Four previously polio-free countries were designated in 2009 as having reestablished wild poliovirus (WPV) transmission (lasting >12 months) after importation. The routine immunization coverage and polio eradication campaigns in these countries were not able to stop outbreaks following importation by that year, when a new Strategic Plan to eradicate polio was being formed. Other countries in Africa and elsewhere that have experienced outbreaks after WPV importation have implemented immunization activities that stopped transmission within 6 months of WPV confirmation. The Global Polio Eradication Initiative 2010-2012 Strategic Plan aimed for all four of these countries to stop reestablished WPV transmission by the end of 2010. As of March 2011, progress has been very good in Sudan, not on track in Angola, and at risk of failure of meeting the target date in Chad and the Democratic Republic of the Congo. Achieving polio eradication by the end of 2012 depends on stopping WPV transmission in the four countries that have never interrupted WPV transmission and in those four that have reestablished WPV transmission.


To access the full article, go to: http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/mm6010a3.htm
 
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15.  MMWR reports on polio outbreak in Republic of the Congo

CDC published "Notes from the Field: Poliomyelitis Outbreak--Republic of the Congo, September 2010-February 2011" in the March 18 issue of MMWR. Excerpts from the article follow.


On November 4, 2010, a case of wild poliovirus type 1 (WPV1) was confirmed in a resident of the port city, Pointe Noire, the first WPV case in Republic of the Congo (ROC) in 10 years. . . . Subsequent investigation, including active case finding, revealed increased acute flaccid paralysis (AFP) hospital admissions beginning in September. . . . A provisional total of 554 AFP cases were identified nationally. . .

All international travelers are advised to have completed a primary series of polio vaccinations before travel. Travelers from the United States to countries with recent WPV transmission or countries neighboring them also should receive a single adult booster inactivated poliovirus vaccine dose before departure. Travelers who are inadequately vaccinated against polio or whose past vaccination history is uncertain should contact their physician to discuss polio vaccination options before traveling. . . .


To access the full article, go to: http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/mm6010a4.htm
 
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16.  Award-winning DVD! "Immunization Techniques: Best Practices with Infants, Children, and Adults"--from the California Department of Public Health, Immunization Branch

The California Department of Public Health (CDPH), Immunization Branch, has updated its award-winning training video, "Immunization Techniques: Best Practices with Infants, Children, and Adults." The 25-minute program can be used to train new employees and to refresh the skills of experienced staff. The video demonstrates the skills and techniques needed to administer vaccines to patients of all ages. It includes instruction on the following:
  • Selecting, preparing, and administering injectable, oral, and nasal vaccines
  • Documenting immunizations
  • Making patients comfortable and educating them
  • Facilitating staff and patient communication

Prices start at $17 each for 1-9 copies and are greatly reduced for large orders, dropping to $3 each for 1,000-1,499 copies.

To learn more about the DVD, and find out how to order it, go to: http://www.immunize.org/shop/toolkit_iztechdvd.asp

For quotes on larger quantities, call (651) 647-9009 or email admininfo@immunize.org

The Immunization Action Coalition is the only nationwide vendor of this new DVD.

Note for healthcare settings located in California: Contact your local health department immunization program for a free copy.

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17.  Minnesota Coalition for Adult Immunization's 20th annual conference to be held April 8

The Minnesota Coalition for Adult Immunization will hold its 20th annual conference on April 8 at the Minnesota Landscape Arboretum in Chaska. The title of this year's conference is "Issues and Strategies in Adult Vaccine Preventable Diseases."

For more information, go to: http://www.stratishealth.org/events
 
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18.  2011 Ohio Immunization Conference scheduled for May 13 in Cleveland

The Consortium for Healthy and Immunized Communities (CHIC) and Boonshoft School of Medicine, Wright State University will be hosting the 2011 Ohio Immunization Conference. The conference will be held on May 13 in Cleveland. Speakers at the conference will include Paul Offit, MD, Children's Hospital of Philadelphia; JoEllen Wolicki, RN, BSN, and Stephen Cochi, MD, MPH, CDC; and Litjen Tan, PhD, MS, American Medical Association.

The 2011 Ohio Immunization Conference will focus on the anti-vaccine movement and the threat to our community, current trends and complex immunization issues, common errors in immunization, the impact of global vaccination programs, along with a discussion on vaccine financing for both families and physicians.

To preview an invitation and agenda or for additional information please go to: http://www.chicohio.com/cureventpubl.html
 
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This website is supported in part by a cooperative agreement from the National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases (Grant No. 5U38IP000290) at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in Atlanta, GA. The website content is the sole responsibility of IAC and does not necessarily represent the official views of CDC.