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Immunization Action Coalition

IAC Express 2011

Issue number 914: February 22, 2011

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Contents of this Issue
Select a title to jump to the article.
  1. U.S. Department of Health and Human Services releases National Vaccine Plan
  2. New handout for parents about vaccine safety now available
  3. MMWR reports on deaths from acute HBV infection associated with assisted blood glucose monitoring
  4. IAC's Video of the Week features Dr. Paul Offit on The Colbert Report
  5. IAC updates staff-education resources on vaccine contraindications and precautions
  6. Spotlight on immunize.org: top resources for communicating with parents about vaccines
  7. CDC Health Advisory Network notifies healthcare professionals about best practices for using PCR for diagnosing pertussis
  8. CDC releases training videos on pertussis specimen collection
  9. MMWR publishes report on U.S. influenza activity from December 12, 2010 to February 5, 2011
  10. CDC offers new patient education materials related to hepatitis B
  11. Influenza vaccination is recommended for almost everyone, so please keep vaccinating!
  12. Award-winning DVD! "Immunization Techniques: Best Practices with Infants, Children, and Adults"--from the California Department of Public Health, Immunization Branch
  13. MMWR reports on potential transmission of viral hepatitis via stored blood vessels
  14. Reminder: NFID's Annual Conference on Vaccine Research to be held May 16-18 in Baltimore
  15. California Immunization Coalition Summit scheduled for April 18 in Los Angeles
  16. Virginia's Vaccine Update Conference to be held on May 6 in Richmond
 
Abbreviations
AAFP, American Academy of Family Physicians; AAP, American Academy of Pediatrics; ACIP, Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices; AMA, American Medical Association; CDC, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention; FDA, Food and Drug Administration; IAC, Immunization Action Coalition; MMWR, Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report; NCIRD, National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases; NIVS, National Influenza Vaccine Summit; VIS, Vaccine Information Statement; VPD, vaccine-preventable disease; WHO, World Health Organization.
  
Issue 914: February 22, 2011
1.  U.S. Department of Health and Human Services releases National Vaccine Plan

On February 16, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) released an updated National Vaccine Plan. Excerpts from a related press release follow.


HHS RELEASES NEW STRATEGIC PLAN TO ADVANCE VACCINE AND IMMUNIZATION SCIENCE AND POLICY FOR THE NEXT DECADE

The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services today unveiled a new National Vaccine Plan to enhance coordination of all aspects of federal vaccine and immunization activities. Its goal is to ensure that all Americans can access the preventive benefits of vaccines.

The plan is a wide-ranging guide to innovating the nation's vaccine system. It addresses such issues as research and development, supply, financing, distribution, safety, global cooperation, and informed decision-making among consumers and healthcare providers.

This is the first update of the National Vaccine Plan since the original version in 1994. . . .

Despite the success of vaccines in reducing death and disability over the last century, many Americans still suffer from infectious diseases that can be prevented by vaccines. The plan offers innovative approaches to improve delivery of existing vaccines and to spur development of new products to prevent infectious disease. . . .


To access the National Vaccine Plan in PDF format, as well as more information including the full press release, go to: http://www.hhs.gov/nvpo/vacc_plan
 
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2 New handout for parents about vaccine safety now available

A new 4-page handout for parents titled "Vaccine Safety Resources" has just been released. This resource includes information on immunization and vaccine safety available from eight different organizations, and also includes titles of books to help parents who have vaccine concerns.

This new resource was reviewed and approved by the American Academy of Pediatrics, Every Child By Two, Immunization Action Coalition, Institute for Vaccine Safety, National Network for Immunization Information, and Parents of Kids with Infectious Diseases.

To access this resource from IAC's website, go to: http://www.immunize.org/vaccine-safety-resources.pdf
 
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3 MMWR reports on deaths from acute HBV infection associated with assisted blood glucose monitoring

CDC published "Notes from the Field: Deaths from Acute Hepatitis B Virus Infection Associated with Assisted Blood Glucose Monitoring in an Assisted-Living Facility--North Carolina, August-October 2010," in the February 18 issue of MMWR. The first two sentences and the second paragraph are reprinted below.


Sharing of blood glucose monitoring equipment in assisted-living facilities has resulted in at least 16 outbreaks of hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection in the United States since 2004. On October 12, 2010, the North Carolina Division of Public Health (NCDPH) and the Wayne County Health Department were notified by a local hospital of four residents of a single assisted-living facility with suspected acute HBV infection. . . .

The investigation identified unsafe practices, including sharing of reusable fingerstick lancing devices approved for single patient use only and shared use of blood glucose meters without cleaning and disinfection between patients. Of 87 persons who had resided in the facility during the study period, 47 were excluded from analysis because of HBV immunity (20 persons), chronic infection (one person), or unknown HBV status (26 persons). Of the remaining 40, eight met the case definition. Of these, all were hospitalized, and six died from hepatitis complications. All eight were among the 15 residents whom facility staff had assisted with blood glucose monitoring; none of 25 residents who had not been assisted with blood glucose monitoring were infected.


To access the full article, go to: http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/mm6006a5.htm
 
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4 IAC's Video of the Week features Dr. Paul Offit on The Colbert Report

IAC encourages IAC Express readers to watch a 5-minute video featuring footage from the January 31 episode of the Comedy Central show, The Colbert Report. In this video, Dr. Offit is interviewed by Stephen Colbert about his new book, "Deadly Choices: How the Anti-Vaccine Movement Threatens Us All."

The video will be available on the home page of IAC's website through February 27. To access it, go to: http://www.immunize.org and click on the image under the words Video of the Week.

To order the book from the publisher, Perseus Books Group, go to: http://perseuspublicity.com/basic/reviews.php?isbn=9780465021499

Alternatively, find the book at your local bookstore or from online booksellers.

Remember to bookmark IAC's home page to view a new video every Monday. To view an IAC Video of the Week from the past, go to the video archive at http://www.immunize.org/votw
 
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5 IAC updates staff-education resources on vaccine contraindications and precautions

IAC recently revised the following two important handouts for healthcare professionals based on ACIP's "General Recommendations on Immunization," which was released on January 28, 2011.

(1) IAC updated "Guide to Contraindications and Precautions to Commonly Used Vaccines" to take into account the switch from PCV7 to PCV13 vaccine, the addition of severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) as a contraindication for rotavirus vaccination, changes to the Tdap section, and other edits. This handout includes information about vaccines for both children and adults. Go to: http://www.immunize.org/catg.d/p3072a.pdf

(2) IAC updated "Guide to Contraindications and Precautions to Commonly Used Vaccines in Adults," to include changes to the Tdap section and other edits. Go to: http://www.immunize.org/catg.d/p3072.pdf

CDC has developed two new web resource based on the vaccine contraindications and precautions excerpted from ACIP's updated "General Recommendations on Immunization." One is "Chart of Contraindications and Precautions to Commonly Used Vaccines"; the other is "Conditions Commonly Misperceived as Contraindications to Vaccination."

To access CDC's web resource "Chart of Contraindications and Precautions to Commonly Used Vaccines," go to: http://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/recs/vac-admin/contraindications-vacc.htm

To access CDC's web resource "Conditions Commonly Misperceived as Contraindications to Vaccination," go to: http://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/recs/vac-admin/contraindications-misconceptions.htm

To access ACIP's "General Recommendations on Immunization," go to: http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/pdf/rr/rr6002.pdf

IAC's Handouts for Patients and Staff web section offers healthcare professionals and the public approximately 250 FREE English-language handouts (many also available in translation), which we encourage website users to print out, copy, and distribute widely. To access all of IAC's free handouts, go to: http://www.immunize.org/handouts
 
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6 Spotlight on immunize.org: top resources for communicating with parents about vaccines

Are you looking for background information and practical resources that will help you discuss immunization with concerned parents? Look no further. IAC's Vaccine Concerns web section provides access to top vaccination resources from trusted sources such as CDC, AAP, Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, IAC, and many more.

The Vaccine Concerns web section is divided into two main parts: (1) specific topics that parents and patients have questions about (e.g., Adjuvants, Autism, MMR, and Dr. Sears' Alternative Schedule) and (2) helpful resources for communicating about vaccines, including Talking with Parents, the Importance of Vaccines, and Vaccine Safety.

For a wealth of information on Vaccine Concerns topics, visit http://www.immunize.org/concerns
 
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7 CDC Health Advisory Network notifies healthcare professionals about best practices for using PCR for diagnosing pertussis

On February 16, CDC issued a Health Advisory titled "Best Practices for Health Care Professionals on the Use of Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) for Diagnosing Pertussis." The summary paragraph is reprinted below.


With the continuing resurgence of pertussis, healthcare professionals will likely see more patients with suspected pertussis. Proper testing criteria, timing of testing, specimen collection techniques, protocols for avoiding specimen contamination, and appropriate interpretation of test results are all necessary to ensure that Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) reliably informs patient diagnosis. PCR is an important tool for timely diagnosis of pertussis and is increasingly available to clinicians. PCR is a molecular technique used to detect DNA sequences of the Bordetella pertussis bacterium and unlike culture does not require viable (live) bacteria present in the specimen. Despite this advantage, PCR can give results that are falsely-negative or falsely-positive. The following compilation of best practices is intended to help healthcare professionals optimize the use of PCR testing for pertussis by avoiding some of the more common pitfalls leading to inaccurate results.


To access the complete advisory, including recommendations for testing and understanding and interpreting PCR results, go to: http://www2a.cdc.gov/HAN/ArchiveSys/ViewMsgV.asp?AlertNum=00319
 
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8 CDC releases training videos on pertussis specimen collection

In light of the 2010 pertussis increase, clinicians are increasingly ordering tests for pertussis. Appropriate specimen collection is vital to obtaining accurate diagnostic results. CDC recently released two training videos for pertussis specimen collection. The videos illustrate the appropriate collection and handling techniques for nasopharyngeal swab and aspirate procedures.

These training videos are available in English and Spanish at http://www.cdc.gov/pertussis/clinical/diagnostic-testing/specimen-collection.html
 
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9 MMWR publishes report on U.S. influenza activity from December 12, 2010 to February 5, 2011

CDC published "Update: Influenza Activity--United States, December 12, 2010-February 5, 2011" in the February 18 issue of MMWR. A summary made available to the press is reprinted below in its entirety.


Influenza is currently present in all 50 states, and activity is widespread in approximately 75 percent of states. The weekly number of out-patient visits for influenza-like illness has steadily risen since the first week of January. The percentage of overall deaths attributed to pneumonia or influenza first exceeded the epidemic threshold in the last week of January. The number of pediatric influenza-associated deaths that have been reported tripled (from 10 prior to January 16, 2011 to 30 since January 16, 2011) in the past month. In 2010-11, influenza continues to be associated with a substantial number of out-patient visits, hospitalizations, and deaths, particularly among high-risk persons. It is not too late to be vaccinated. Annual vaccination is the most effective method to prevent influenza and its complications. All persons older than 6 months of age who have not yet been vaccinated this season should talk to their healthcare providers about getting vaccinated.


To access the full article, go to: http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/mm6006a4.htm
 
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10.  CDC offers new patient education materials related to hepatitis B

CDC recently updated the following perinatal hepatitis B resources for patients.

"Protect Your Baby for Life--When a Pregnant Woman Has Hepatitis B" Go to: http://www.cdc.gov/hepatitis/HBV/PDFs/HepBPerinatal-ProtectWhenPregnant.pdf

"Protect Your Baby for Life--Hepatitis B and Your Baby" Go to: http://www.cdc.gov/hepatitis/HBV/PDFs/HepBPerinatal-ProtectHepBYourBaby.pdf

Additional brochures and fact sheets about viral hepatitis for the public can be accessed at http://www.cdc.gov/hepatitis/B/PatientEduB.htm#cdc
 
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11.  Influenza vaccination is recommended for almost everyone, so please keep vaccinating!

Influenza vaccination is recommended for everyone age 6 months and older, so please keep vaccinating your patients.

If you don't have influenza vaccine, you can direct patients to the Google Flu Vaccine Finder. It helps the public find nearby locations where influenza vaccine is available. It's as simple as entering a zip code. Visit the Google Flu Vaccine Finder: http://www.google.com/flushot

Following is a list of resources related to influenza disease and vaccination for healthcare professionals and the public.

To access IAC's handouts related to influenza, including screening questionnaires, patient education pieces, and sample standing orders, go to: http://www.immunize.org/handouts/influenza-vaccines.asp

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12.  Award-winning DVD! "Immunization Techniques: Best Practices with Infants, Children, and Adults"--from the California Department of Public Health, Immunization Branch

The California Department of Public Health (CDPH), Immunization Branch, has updated its award-winning training video, "Immunization Techniques: Best Practices with Infants, Children, and Adults." The 25-minute program can be used to train new employees and to refresh the skills of experienced staff. The video demonstrates the skills and techniques needed to administer vaccines to patients of all ages. It includes instruction on the following:
  • Selecting, preparing, and administering injectable, oral, and nasal vaccines
     
  • Documenting immunizations
     
  • Making patients comfortable and educating them
     
  • Facilitating staff and patient communication

Prices start at $17 each for 1-9 copies and are greatly reduced for large orders, dropping to $3 each for 1,000-1,499 copies.

To learn more about the DVD, and find out how to order it, go to: http://www.immunize.org/shop/toolkit_iztechdvd.asp

For quotes on larger quantities, call (651) 647-9009 or email admininfo@immunize.org

The Immunization Action Coalition is the only nationwide vendor of this new DVD.

Note for healthcare settings located in California: Contact your local health department immunization program for a free copy.

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13.  MMWR reports on potential transmission of viral hepatitis via stored blood vessels

CDC published "Potential Transmission of Viral Hepatitis Through Use of Stored Blood Vessels as Conduits in Organ Transplantation--Pennsylvania, 2009," in the February 18 issue of MMWR. A summary made available to the press is reprinted below in its entirety.


Solid organ transplantation sometimes requires the use of blood vessel "conduits" from a deceased donor to connect transplanted organ vessels to recipient vessels. Vessel conduits not immediately used are stored for later use. Vessel conduits from hepatitis B virus and hepatitis C virus seropositive donors can be stored, but are intended for use in seropositive patients only. Unintended viral hepatitis transmission can be reduced by discontinuing the practice of storing hepatitis-seropositive vessel conduits, and should be considered at all transplant centers. Organ procurement organizations, transplant centers, and the public health community should be aware of the potential risk of hepatitis virus transmission from vessel conduit use. CDC recommends that organ procurement organizations and transplant centers discontinue the practice of storing hepatitis-seropositive vessel conduits.


To access the full article, go to: http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/mm6006a3.htm
 
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14.  Reminder: NFID's Annual Conference on Vaccine Research to be held May 16-18 in Baltimore

NFID's 14th Annual Conference on Vaccine Research, the largest scientific forum devoted exclusively to the research and development of vaccines and related technologies for prevention and treatment of disease through immunization, will be held May 16-18, in Baltimore, Maryland.

For more information, go to: http://www.nfid.org/conferences/vaccine11
 
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15.  California Immunization Coalition Summit scheduled for April 18 in Los Angeles

The California Immunization Coalition will host its annual summit on April 18, in Los Angeles. Topics will include California's new school entry requirement law, best practices to eliminate immunization disparities, and methods to increase immunization rates in all age groups.

For details about the 2011 California Immunization Coalition Summit, including the agenda and registration information, go to: http://www.ImmunizeCA.org
 
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16.  Virginia's Vaccine Update Conference to be held on May 6 in Richmond

Project Immunize Virginia's 11th Annual Vaccine Update Conference will be held on May 6 in Richmond. The conference will focus on the latest vaccine recommendations, techniques, and strategies to reach diverse populations with advice from state and national experts, including William Atkinson, MD, MPH, medical epidemiologist, NCIRD, CDC, and Paul Offit, MD, chief, Division of Infectious Diseases, and director, Vaccine Education Center, Children's Hospital of Philadelphia.

For more information, go to: http://www.immunizeva.org/sp_11_vaccine_conference.php
 
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Immunization Action Coalition  •  Saint Paul, MN
tel 651-647-9009  •  fax 651-647-9131
 
This website is supported in part by a cooperative agreement from the National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases (Grant No. 5U38IP000290) at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in Atlanta, GA. The website content is the sole responsibility of IAC and does not necessarily represent the official views of CDC.