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Immunization Action Coalition

IAC Express 2011

Issue number 911: January 31, 2011

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Contents of this Issue
Select a title to jump to the article.
  1. CDC issues new "General Recommendations on Immunization: Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices"
  2. CDC issues updated recommendations for use of meningococcal conjugate vaccines
  3. Spotlight on immunize.org: quick access to ACIP recommendations
  4. IAC's Video of the Week explains how the GAVI Alliance's finance mechanisms raise funds to provide immunization services
  5. Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation and the Crown Prince of Abu Dhabi pledge $100 million to purchase and deliver childhood vaccines to Pakistan and Afghanistan
  6. Influenza vaccination is recommended for almost everyone, so please keep vaccinating!
  7. Award-winning DVD! "Immunization Techniques: Best Practices with Infants, Children, and Adults"--from the California Department of Public Health, Immunization Branch
  8. Register for the 2011 National Immunization Conference by February 18 to get the early-bird rate
  9. MMWR publishes report on a case of diphtheria-like illness in Idaho in 2010
  10. Rotavirus vaccine VIS now available in Karen language
  11. WHO publishes the December 2010 meeting report of the Global Advisory Committee on Vaccine Safety
  12. World Vaccine Congress scheduled for April 11-14 in Washington, DC
 
Abbreviations
AAFP, American Academy of Family Physicians; AAP, American Academy of Pediatrics; ACIP, Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices; AMA, American Medical Association; CDC, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention; FDA, Food and Drug Administration; IAC, Immunization Action Coalition; MMWR, Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report; NCIRD, National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases; NIVS, National Influenza Vaccine Summit; VIS, Vaccine Information Statement; VPD, vaccine-preventable disease; WHO, World Health Organization.
  
Issue 911: January 31, 2011
1.  CDC issues new "General Recommendations on Immunization: Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices"

On January 28, CDC published "General Recommendations on Immunization: Recommendations of the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP)" as an MMWR Recommendations and Reports. Portions of the Summary section are reprinted below.


This report is a revision of the General Recommendations on Immunization and updates the 2006 statement by the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) (CDC. General recommendations on immunization: recommendations of the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices [ACIP]. . . .

Notable revisions to the 2006 recommendations include (1) revisions to the tables of contraindications and precautions to vaccination, as well as a separate table of conditions that are commonly misperceived as contraindications and precautions; (2) reordering of the report content, with vaccine risk-benefit screening, managing adverse reactions, reporting of adverse events, and the vaccine injury compensation program presented immediately after the discussion of contraindications and precautions; (3) stricter criteria for selecting an appropriate storage unit for vaccines; (4) additional guidance for maintaining the cold chain in the event of unavoidable temperature deviations; and (5) updated revisions for vaccination of patients who have received a hematopoietic cell transplant. The most recent ACIP recommendations for each specific vaccine should be consulted for comprehensive details. This report, ACIP recommendations for each vaccine, and additional information about vaccinations are available from CDC at http://www.cdc.gov/vaccines


To access the complete recommendations in ready-to-print (PDF) format, go to: http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/pdf/rr/rr6002.pdf

To access the complete recommendations in web-text (HTML) format, go to: http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/rr6002a1.htm

 
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2 CDC issues updated recommendations for use of meningococcal conjugate vaccines

CDC published "Updated Recommendations for Use of Meningococcal Conjugate Vaccines--Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP), 2010" in the January 28 issue of MMWR. Reprinted below are portions of the first paragraph of the recommendations, as well as the complete text of two sections: (1) Recommendation for Routine Vaccination of Persons Aged 11 Through 18 Years and (2) CDC Guidance for Transition to an Adolescent Booster Dose.


On October 27, 2010, the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) approved updated recommendations for the use of quadrivalent (serogroups A, C, Y, and W-135) meningococcal conjugate vaccines (Menveo, Novartis; and Menactra, sanofi pasteur) in adolescents and persons at high risk for meningococcal disease. These recommendations supplement the previous ACIP recommendations for meningococcal vaccination. . . . This report summarizes two new recommendations approved by ACIP: (1) routine vaccination of adolescents, preferably at age 11 or 12 years, with a booster dose at age 16 years and (2) a 2-dose primary series administered 2 months apart for persons aged 2 through 54 years with persistent complement component deficiency (e.g., C5-C9, properidin, factor H, or factor D) and functional or anatomic asplenia, and for adolescents with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. CDC guidance for vaccine providers regarding these updated recommendations also is included. . . .

RECOMMENDATION FOR ROUTINE VACCINATION OF PERSONS AGED 11 THROUGH 18 YEARS
ACIP recommends routine vaccination of persons with quadrivalent meningococcal conjugate vaccine at age 11 or 12 years, with a booster dose at age 16 years. After a booster dose of meningococcal conjugate vaccine, antibody titers are higher than after the first dose and are expected to protect adolescents through the period of increased risk through age 21 years. For adolescents who receive the first dose at age 13 through 15 years, a one-time booster dose should be administered, preferably at age 16 through 18 years, before the peak in increased risk. Persons who receive their first dose of meningococcal conjugate vaccine at or after age 16 years do not need a booster dose. Routine vaccination of healthy persons who are not at increased risk for exposure to N. meningitidis is not recommended after age 21 years. . . .

CDC GUIDANCE FOR TRANSITION TO AN ADOLESCENT BOOSTER DOSE
Some schools, colleges, and universities have policies requiring vaccination against meningococcal disease as a condition of enrollment. For ease of program implementation, persons aged 21 years or younger should have documentation of receipt of a dose of meningococcal conjugate vaccine not more than 5 years before enrollment. If the primary dose was administered before the 16th birthday, a booster dose should be administered before enrollment in college. The booster dose can be administered anytime after the 16th birthday to ensure that the booster is provided. The minimum interval between doses of meningococcal conjugate vaccine is 8 weeks. . . .


IAC Express editor's note: Table 2, titled "Summary of meningococcal conjugate vaccine recommendations, by risk group--Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP), 2010," is an especially useful resource.

To access the complete recommendations in ready-to-print (PDF) format, go to: http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/pdf/wk/mm6003.pdf and see pages 72-76.

To access the complete recommendations in web-text (HTML) format, go to: http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/mm6003a3.htm

 
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3 Spotlight on immunize.org: quick access to ACIP recommendations

Looking for quick access to official recommendations of CDC's Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP)? Look no further. IAC's ACIP web section provides up-to-date access to ACIP vaccine recommendations, which are arranged by date, vaccine, and topic.

For IAC's main page of ACIP recommendations, which is organized chronologically by recommendation release dates, go to: http://www.immunize.org/acip

For IAC's ACIP Vaccine Index section, go to: http://www.immunize.org/acip/acip_vax.asp

For ACIP statements arranged by special topic, go to: http://www.immunize.org/acip/acip_topic.asp

For additional information about ACIP, including links to CDC's ACIP web section, VFC resolutions, and CDC's vaccine price list, go to: http://www.immunize.org/acip/acip_resources.asp

 
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4 IAC's Video of the Week explains how the GAVI Alliance's finance mechanisms raise funds to provide immunization services

IAC encourages IAC Express readers to watch a 5-minute video that explains how the GAVI Alliance pioneered innovative finance mechanisms to raise funds to buy affordable vaccines and provide immunizations.

The video will be available on the home page of IAC's website through February 6. To access it, go to: http://www.immunize.org and click on the image under the words Video of the Week. After February 6, access the video directly on YouTube at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KWd-n82e5WY

To learn more about the GAVI Alliance, go to: http://www.gavialliance.org

Remember to bookmark IAC's home page to view a new video every Monday. To view an IAC Video of the Week from the past, go to the video archive at http://www.immunize.org/votw

 
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5 Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation and the Crown Prince of Abu Dhabi pledge $100 million to purchase and deliver childhood vaccines to Pakistan and Afghanistan

On January 26, Bill Gates, co-chair of the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, and His Highness Sheikh Mohammed bin Sayed Al Nahyan, Crown Prince of Abu Dhabi, announced that each will donate $50 million to purchase and deliver childhood vaccines to Pakistan and Afghanistan. Two-thirds of the $100 million will go to the GAVI Alliance for purchasing and delivering pneumococcal vaccine and pentavalent vaccine (which protects against diphtheria, pertussis, tetanus, hepatitis B, and Haemophilus influenzae type B [Hib]). One-third will go to the World Health Organization and UNICEF to purchase polio vaccine.

Additional information is available in a PR Newswire press release here.
 
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6 Influenza vaccination is recommended for almost everyone, so please keep vaccinating!

Influenza vaccination is recommended for everyone age 6 months and older, so please keep vaccinating your patients.

If you don't have influenza vaccine, you can direct patients to the Google Flu Vaccine Finder. It helps the public find nearby locations where influenza vaccine is available. It's as simple as entering a zip code. Visit the Google Flu Vaccine Finder: http://www.google.com/flushot

To purchase supplies of influenza vaccine, visit IVATS, the Influenza Vaccine Availability Tracking System. IVATS is operated by the National Influenza Vaccine Summit and provides information about vaccine manufacturers and distributors who have influenza vaccine available for purchase. To access IVATS, go to: http://www.preventinfluenza.org/ivats

Following is a list of resources related to influenza disease and vaccination for healthcare professionals and the public.

To access IAC's handouts related to influenza, including screening questionnaires, patient education pieces, and sample standing orders, go to: http://www.immunize.org/handouts/influenza-vaccines.asp

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7 Award-winning DVD! "Immunization Techniques: Best Practices with Infants, Children, and Adults"--from the California Department of Public Health, Immunization Branch

The California Department of Public Health (CDPH), Immunization Branch, has updated its award-winning training video, "Immunization Techniques: Best Practices with Infants, Children, and Adults." The 25-minute program can be used to train new employees and to refresh the skills of experienced staff. The video demonstrates the skills and techniques needed to administer vaccines to patients of all ages. It includes instruction on the following:
  • Selecting, preparing, and administering injectable, oral, and nasal vaccines
  • Documenting immunizations
  • Making patients comfortable and educating them
  • Facilitating staff and patient communication

Prices start at $17 each for 1-9 copies and are greatly reduced for large orders, dropping to $4.25 each for 1,000-1,500 copies.

To learn more about the DVD, and find out how to order it, go to: http://www.immunize.org/shop/toolkit_iztechdvd.asp

For quotes on larger quantities, call (651) 647-9009 or email admininfo@immunize.org

The Immunization Action Coalition is the only nationwide vendor of this new DVD.

Note for healthcare settings located in California: Contact your local health department immunization program for a free copy.

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8 Register for the 2011 National Immunization Conference by February 18 to get the early-bird rate

The 2011 National Immunization Conference (NIC) will be held March 28-31 in Washington, DC. Register early and save money!

Here are the registration rates and cutoff dates:
  • Early-bird registration, through 2/18/2011--$225
  • Regular registration, through 3/11/2011--$250
  • On-site registration--$275

To access more information, including a draft agenda, and to register, go to: http://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/events/nic

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9 MMWR publishes report on a case of diphtheria-like illness in Idaho in 2010

CDC published "Notes from the Field: Respiratory Diphtheria-Like Illness Caused by Toxigenic Corynebacterium ulcerans--Idaho, 2010" in the January 28 issue of MMWR. A portion of the first paragraph and the entire last paragraph are reprinted below.


On September 12, 2010, the Idaho Department of Health and Welfare was notified of a case of respiratory diphtheria-like illness in an Idaho man aged 80 years whose pharyngeal specimens yielded Corynebacterium ulcerans. . . .

Antibiotic treatment of diphtheria-like illness caused by C. ulcerans should follow clinical guidelines for patients infected with C. diphtheriae. Unlike C. diphtheriae infections, human-to-human transmission of C. ulcerans infections has not been documented; therefore, postexposure antibiotic prophylaxis was not administered to close contacts of the Idaho patient. However, because studies on the transmission of C. ulcerans are limited, vaccination status of contacts should be assessed and brought up-to-date, if necessary, with an age-appropriate diphtheria-toxoid-containing vaccine, which prevents disease from toxigenic strains of C. diphtheriae and C. ulcerans. CDC recommends that adults receive a diphtheria-toxoid-containing vaccine every 10 years after completing a primary childhood vaccination series.


To access the complete article in web-text (HTML) format, go to: http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/mm6003a4.htm

 
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10.  Rotavirus vaccine VIS now available in Karen language

The VIS for rotavirus vaccine is now available in Karen (spoken in Burma and Thailand). IAC gratefully acknowledges the Minnesota Department of Health for the translation.

To access the Karen translation of the VIS for rotavirus vaccine, as well as the rotavirus vaccine VIS in English and other translations, go to: http://www.immunize.org/vis/vis_rotavirus.asp

For information about the use of VISs, and for VISs in more than 35 languages, visit IAC's VIS web section at http://www.immunize.org/vis
 
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11.  WHO publishes the December 2010 meeting report of the Global Advisory Committee on Vaccine Safety

On January 28, the WHO publication Weekly Epidemiological Record (WER) published an article titled "Global Advisory Committee on Vaccine Safety, December 2010." An expert clinical and scientific advisory body, the committee deals independently and with scientific rigor with vaccine safety issues of potential global importance.

At the December meeting, the committee reviewed or examined the following: (1) new data related to the risk of intussusception after rotavirus vaccination; (2) new data on the safety of pandemic influenza A (H1N1) 2009 vaccines; (3) the experience of using yellow fever vaccines among HIV-positive people; and (4) the experiences of three West African countries in monitoring the safety of a new meningitis A conjugate vaccine.

To access a ready-to-print (PDF) version of the January 28 WER issue, go to: http://www.who.int/wer/2011/wer8605.pdf
 
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12.  World Vaccine Congress scheduled for April 11-14 in Washington, DC

The World Vaccine Congress will be held in Washington, DC, on April 11-14.

For comprehensive information, including the conference brochure and access to online registration, go to: http://www.terrapinn.com/conference/world-vaccine-congress-washington
 
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Immunization Action Coalition  •  Saint Paul, MN
tel 651-647-9009  •  fax 651-647-9131
 
This website is supported in part by a cooperative agreement from the National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases (Grant No. 5U38IP000290) at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in Atlanta, GA. The website content is the sole responsibility of IAC and does not necessarily represent the official views of CDC.