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Immunization Action Coalition
IAC Express 2010
Issue number 882: August 16, 2010
Please click here to subscribe to IAC Express as well as other FREE IAC periodicals.
Contents of this Issue
Select a title to jump to the article.
  1. New: CDC issues VISs for the two 2010-11 influenza vaccines--available in English only
  2. MMWR publishes ACIP's recommendations for use of CSL's influenza vaccine during 2010-11
  3. IAC updates four handouts, including its vaccine administration record forms, influenza vaccine products chart, and declination of influenza vaccination form
  4. IAC updates online "Ask The Experts" Q&A sections related to PCV and PPSV
  5. IAC's Video of the Week features children promoting the importance of the hepatitis B birth dose
  6. Register for CDC's September 2 Net Conference on ACIP'S influenza recommendations and CDC's communication plans
  7. "CDC Features" educates parents about getting their children vaccinated in time for school
  8. MMWR issues erratum for ACIP's 2010 influenza recommendations
  9. Conference on the Science, Ethics, and Politics of Vaccine Mandates scheduled for September 21 in Philadelphia
  10. WHO issues position paper on rabies vaccine
  11. MMWR publishes report on laboratory containment of wild poliovirus in WHO's Region of the Americas
 
Abbreviations
AAFP, American Academy of Family Physicians; AAP, American Academy of Pediatrics; ACIP, Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices; AMA, American Medical Association; CDC, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention; FDA, Food and Drug Administration; IAC, Immunization Action Coalition; MMWR, Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report; NCIRD, National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases; NIVS, National Influenza Vaccine Summit; VIS, Vaccine Information Statement; VPD, vaccine-preventable disease; WHO, World Health Organization.
  
Issue 882: August 16, 2010
1.  New: CDC issues VISs for the two 2010-11 influenza vaccines--available in English only

On August 10, CDC issued two new interim VISs for influenza vaccine. One is for for trivalent inactivated influenza vaccine (TIV; injectable), the other for live attenuated intranasal influenza vaccine (LAIV; nasal spray). The new VISs are intended for use during the 2010-11 influenza vaccination season. They replace both 2009-10 seasonal influenza vaccine VISs, which were dated 8/11/09.

Page 2 of the 8/10/10 interim VIS for injectable influenza vaccine includes a box with this information for patients:"One brand of inactivated flu vaccine, called Afluria, should not be given to children 8 years of age or younger, except in special circumstances. A related vaccine was associated with fevers and fever-related seizures in young children in Australia. Ask your healthcare provider for more information."

To access the 8/10/10 interim VIS for injectable influenza vaccine, go to: http://www.immunize.org/vis/vis_flu_inactive.asp

To access the 8/10/10 interim VIS for nasal-spray influenza vaccine, go to: http://www.immunize.org/vis/vis_flu_live.asp

Translations will be available in the weeks to come. For information about the use of VISs, and for VISs in more than 35 languages, visit IAC's VIS web section at http://www.immunize.org/vis

For general information about VISs from CDC's website go to: http://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/pubs/vis

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2 MMWR publishes ACIP's recommendations for use of CSL's influenza vaccine during 2010-11

CDC published "Update: Recommendations of the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) Regarding Use of CSL Seasonal Influenza Vaccine (Afluria) in the United States During 2010-11" in the August 13 issue of MMWR. The first paragraph is reprinted below.


During the 2010 influenza season in Australia, administration of a 2010 Southern Hemisphere seasonal influenza trivalent inactivated vaccine (TIV) (Fluvax Junior and Fluvax) manufactured by CSL Biotherapies was associated with increased frequency of fever and febrile seizures in children aged 6 months through 4 years. Postmarketing surveillance indicated increased reports of fever in children aged 5-8 years after vaccination with Fluvax compared to previous seasons. An antigenically equivalent 2010-11 Northern Hemisphere seasonal influenza TIV (Afluria) manufactured by CSL Biotherapies is approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for persons aged >=6 months in the United States. Prescribing information for the 2010-11 Afluria formulation includes a warning that "Administration of CSL's Southern Hemisphere influenza vaccine has been associated with increased postmarketing reports of fever and febrile seizures in children predominantly below the age of 5 years as compared to previous years." In the United States, annual influenza vaccination is recommended for all persons aged >=6 months. On August 5, 2010, the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) recommended that the 2010-11 Afluria vaccine not be administered to children aged 6 months through 8 years. Other age-appropriate, licensed seasonal influenza vaccine formulations should be used for prevention of influenza in these children. If no other age-appropriate, licensed inactivated seasonal influenza vaccine is available for a child aged 5-8 years who has a medical condition that increases their risk for influenza complications, Afluria can be used; however, providers should discuss with the parents or caregivers the benefits and risks of Afluria use before administering this vaccine to children aged 5-8 years.

To access the updated recommendations in full, go to http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/PDF/wk/mm5931.pdf and see pages 989-992.

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3 IAC updates four handouts, including its vaccine administration record forms, influenza vaccine products chart, and declination of influenza vaccination form

IAC recently revised the following four handouts for healthcare professionals.

(1) IAC updated "Vaccine Administration Record for Children and Teens," increasing the form from one page to two, adding a vaccine trade name chart, and including four pages of examples. Go to: http://www.immunize.org/catg.d/p2022.pdf

(2) IAC updated "Vaccine Administration Record for Adults," increasing the form from one page to two, adding a vaccine trade name chart, and including two pages of examples. Go to: http://www.immunize.org/catg.d/p2023.pdf

(3) IAC revised "Influenza Vaccine Products for the 2010-11 Influenza Season," updating it to include information on the products licensed for use 2010-11 and adding instructions for administering injectable and nasal-spray vaccines. Go to: http://www.immunize.org/catg.d/p4072.pdf

(4) IAC made minor revisions to "Declination of Influenza Vaccination." Go to: http://www.immunize.org/catg.d/p4068.pdf

IAC's Handouts for Patients and Staff web section offers healthcare professionals and the public approximately 250 FREE English-language handouts (many also available in translation), which we encourage website users to print out, copy, and distribute widely. To access all of IAC's free handouts, go to: http://www.immunize.org/handouts

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4 IAC updates online "Ask The Experts" Q&A sections related to PCV and PPSV

IAC updated two of its online "Ask the Experts" Q&A sections, one about pneumococcal conjugate vaccine and disease, the other about pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine and disease. Vaccination experts at CDC provided input for updating both sections. IAC's "Ask the Experts" Q&As are reviewed and updated annually. The process is ongoing; IAC Express will inform readers as sections are reviewed and revised.

To access the revised pneumococcal conjugate vaccine and disease Q&As, go to: http://www.immunize.org/askexperts/experts_pcv.asp

To access the revised pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine and disease Q&As, go to: http://www.immunize.org/askexperts/experts_ppv.asp

To access the index page of "Ask the Experts" Q&As for all other vaccines, go to: http://www.immunize.org/askexperts

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5 IAC's Video of the Week features children promoting the importance of the hepatitis B birth dose

Children state the importance of the hepatitis B vaccination at birth in this charming 30-second video developed by HepBMoms. A unique online resource, HepBMoms (http://www.hepbmoms.org) is intended for pregnant mothers, perinatal hepatitis B prevention program coordinators, healthcare providers, and anyone who is concerned about hepatitis B.

The video will be available on the home page of IAC's website through August 22. To access it, go to: http://www.immunize.org and click on the image under the words Video of the Week. To access the video after August 22, visit http://www.hepbmoms.org

Remember to bookmark IAC's home page to view a new video every Monday. To view an IAC Video of the Week from the past, go to the video archive at http://www.immunize.org/votw

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6 Register for CDC's September 2 Net Conference on ACIP'S influenza recommendations and CDC's communication plans

The next NCIRD live Net Conference will cover the 2010 influenza recommendations and CDC's influenza vaccine communications plans and resources. The Net Conference is scheduled from noon to 1PM ET on September 2. Cindy Weinbaum, MD, MPH, will discuss the recommendations; Kristine Sheedy, PhD, will outline CDC's communications plans and resources. Andrew Kroger, MD, MPH, will moderate.

Participation in the Q&A section of the program is available by phone and Internet. This is a limited-entry event. CDC urges early registration; registration will close on August 31 or when the course is full.

To register, go to: http://www2.cdc.gov/vaccines/ed/ciinc

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7 "CDC Features" educates parents about getting their children vaccinated in time for school

The "CDC Features" web section now includes information for parents on the importance of making sure their children's vaccinations are up to date in time for the start of the school year.

To access "School Starts Soon--Is Your Child Fully Vaccinated?" go to: http://www.cdc.gov/Features/CatchUpImmunizations

To access an alphabetical index of all "CDC Features," go to: http://www.cdc.gov/features

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8 MMWR issues erratum for ACIP's 2010 influenza recommendations

CDC published " Erratum: Vol. 59, No. RR-8" in the August 13 issue of MMWR. The erratum is reprinted below. IAC Express editor's note: You will find a link to the corrected 2010 influenza recommendations at the end of this IAC Express article.


In the MMWR Recommendations and Reports "Prevention and Control of Influenza with Vaccines: Recommendations of the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP), 2010," on page 18, the first two sentences under the heading "Pregnant Women and Neonates" should read, "FDA has classified FluLaval, Fluarix (GlaxoSmithKline Biologicals), and Agriflu (Novartis Vaccines and Diagnostics Limited) influenza vaccines as "Pregnancy Category B" medications, indicating that animal reproduction studies have not demonstrated a fetal risk, but there are no controlled studies in pregnant women; all other influenza vaccines are classified as Pregnancy Category C" medications, indicating that adequate animal reproduction studies have not been conducted. Available data do not indicate that any influenza vaccine causes fetal harm when administered to a pregnant woman, and any of the approved TIV formulations may be used for vaccinating pregnant women."


To access the erratum in web-text (HTML) format, go to: http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/mm5931a6.htm

To access the corrected "Prevention and Control of Influenza with Vaccines: Recommendations of the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP), 2010," go to: http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/pdf/rr/rr5908.pdf

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9 Conference on the Science, Ethics, and Politics of Vaccine Mandates scheduled for September 21 in Philadelphia

The University of Pennsylvania's Center for Bioethics will host a conference on the Science, Ethics, and Politics of Vaccine Mandates on September 21. Speakers include Arthur Caplan, PhD, director, Center for Bioethics, and Paul Offit, MD, chief, Infectious Diseases Section, Children's Hospital of Philadelphia.

For information on the conference, including the program and links to readings, go to: http://www.bioethics.upenn.edu/ConferenceSept21.shtml

IMPORTANT: There is no fee to attend but you MUST register at bioevmc@mail.med.upenn.edu Or contact Janice Pringle or Matthew Isensberg, at the Center for Bioethics, (215) 898-7136.

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10.  WHO issues position paper on rabies vaccine

The August 6 issue of the WHO periodical "Weekly Epidemiological Record" includes the latest WHO position paper on rabies vaccine. To access it, go to: http://www.who.int/wer/2010/wer8532.pdf

A collection of WHO position papers on vaccines is available in alphabetical order at http://www.who.int/immunization/documents/positionpapers

They are available in chronological order on the IAC website at http://www.immunize.org/who

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11.  MMWR publishes report on laboratory containment of wild poliovirus in WHO's Region of the Americas

CDC published "Completion of National Laboratory Inventories for Wild Poliovirus Containment--Region of the Americas, March 2010" in the August 13 issue of MMWR. A summary made available to the press is reprinted below in its entirety.


With progress toward eradication of wild poliovirus transmission since 1988, the World Health Organization (WHO) has been assisting member countries in starting the process leading to laboratory containment of wild poliovirus. Previously, countries in the European and Western Pacific regions of WHO completed Phase I of this process, a comprehensive survey, and an inventory of facilities holding wild poliovirus or infected samples. Following surveys and inventories conducted by 43 countries and territories in the Region of the Americas and voluntary destruction of some materials, 215 facilities in nine countries of the Americas (including 180 in the United States) reported retaining wild poliovirus as of March 2010. Completion of the survey and inventory in three polio-free WHO regions provides a solid base for subsequent steps toward final containment once interruption of wild poliovirus transmission is achieved. Like smallpox, laboratory containment of wild poliovirus (and potentially infectious stored samples) in safe conditions is essential to minimize the risk for reintroducing wild poliovirus into poliomyelitis-free communities after eradication. Completion of the first phase toward laboratory containment in the Americas, Europe, and Asia is a major advance in preparation of polio eradication.

To access the full article in web-text (HTML) format, go to: http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/mm5931a3.htm

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This website is supported in part by a cooperative agreement from the National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases (Grant No. 5U38IP000290) at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in Atlanta, GA. The website content is the sole responsibility of IAC and does not necessarily represent the official views of CDC.