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Immunization Action Coalition
IAC Express 2010
Issue number 870: June 1, 2010
Please click here to subscribe to IAC Express as well as other FREE IAC periodicals.
Contents of this Issue
Select a title to jump to the article.
  1. MMWR discusses licensure of bivalent human papillomavirus vaccine (HPV2, Cervarix) for use in females and presents CDC's updated HPV vaccination recommendations
  2. MMWR discusses licensure of quadrivalent human papillomavirus vaccine (HPV4, Gardasil) for use in males and presents CDC's guidance for its use
  3. New: CDC publishes interim VIS for MMRV vaccine
  4. Check out IAC's redesigned print materials section
  5. IAC develops new handout to help healthcare professionals administer pneumococcal vaccines to children
  6. IAC updates "Do I need any vaccinations today?"
  7. AAP releases policy statement on the prevention of Streptococcus pneumoniae infections in infants and children
  8. IAC's Video of the Week offers a personal perspective on chronic hepatitis B virus infection
  9. Hep B Moms helps empower women so they can say, "Hep B stops with me"
  10. Interim VIS for pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV13) now available in Indonesian
  11. CDC's Epidemiology & Prevention of Vaccine-Preventable Diseases course to be offered in Colorado, July 12-14
 
Abbreviations
AAFP, American Academy of Family Physicians; AAP, American Academy of Pediatrics; ACIP, Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices; AMA, American Medical Association; CDC, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention; FDA, Food and Drug Administration; IAC, Immunization Action Coalition; MMWR, Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report; NCIRD, National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases; NIVS, National Influenza Vaccine Summit; VIS, Vaccine Information Statement; VPD, vaccine-preventable disease; WHO, World Health Organization.
  
Issue 870: June 1, 2010
1.  MMWR discusses licensure of bivalent human papillomavirus vaccine (HPV2, Cervarix) for use in females and presents CDC's updated HPV vaccination recommendations

CDC published "FDA Licensure of Bivalent Human Papillomavirus Vaccine (HPV2, Cervarix) for Use in Females and Updated HPV Vaccination Recommendations from the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP)" in the May 28 issue of MMWR. The first paragraph and the section titled Vaccine Recommendations for HPV2 and HPV4 are reprinted below. For detailed information about the recommendations, including dosage, administration, and schedules; special situations; and precautions and contraindications, see the links to the complete recommendations given at the end of this IAC Express article.


On October 16, 2009, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) licensed bivalent human papillomavirus vaccine (HPV2; Cervarix, GlaxoSmithKline) for use in females aged 10 through 25 years. Cervarix is the second human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine licensed for use in females in the United States. Quadrivalent HPV vaccine (HPV4; Gardasil, Merck & Co, Inc.) was licensed in 2006 for use in females aged 9 through 26 years, and the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) recommended routine HPV4 vaccination of females aged 11 or 12 years, and catch-up vaccination for females aged 13 through 26 years. This report provides updated recommendations for routine and catch-up vaccination of females with either HPV2 or HPV4.

VACCINE RECOMMENDATIONS FOR HPV2 AND HPV4
ACIP recommends routine vaccination of females aged 11 or 12 years with 3 doses of either HPV2 or HPV4. The vaccination series can be started beginning at age 9 years.

Vaccination is recommended for females aged 13 through 26 years who have not been vaccinated previously or who have not completed the 3-dose series. If a female reaches age 26 years before the vaccination series is complete, remaining doses can be administered after age 26 years. Ideally, vaccine should be administered before potential exposure to HPV through sexual contact.

ACIP recommends vaccination with HPV2 or HPV4 for prevention of cervical cancers and precancers. Both vaccines might provide protection against some other HPV-related cancers in addition to cervical cancer, although there are currently only data sufficient to recommend HPV4 for protection against vulvar and vaginal cancers and precancers. HPV4 is recommended also for prevention of genital warts.


To access the full article in PDF format, go to:
http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/PDF/wk/mm5920.pdf and see pages 626-629.

To access the article in web-text (HTML) format, go to:
http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/mm5920a4.htm

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2 MMWR discusses licensure of quadrivalent human papillomavirus vaccine (HPV4, Gardasil) for use in males and presents CDC's guidance for its use

CDC published "FDA Licensure of Quadrivalent Human Papillomavirus Vaccine (HPV4, Gardasil) for Use in Males and Guidance from the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP)" in the May 28 issue of MMWR. The first paragraph and the section titled Vaccine Guidance are reprinted below. For detailed information about the recommendations, including administration, special situations, and precautions and contraindications, see the links to the complete recommendations given at the end of this IAC Express article.



On October 16, 2009, the Food and Drug Administration licensed quadrivalent human papillomavirus vaccine (HPV4; Gardasil, Merck & Co. Inc.) for use in males aged 9 through 26 years for prevention of genital warts caused by human papillomavirus (HPV) types 6 and 11. HPV4 had been licensed previously for use in females aged 9 through 26 years for prevention of HPV 6, 11, 16, and 18-related outcomes (i.e., vaginal, vulvar, and cervical precancers and cancers and genital warts). The Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) recommends routine vaccination of females at age 11 or 12 years and catch-up vaccination for females aged 13 through 26 years. On October 21, 2009, ACIP provided guidance that HPV4 may be given to males aged 9 through 26 years to reduce their likelihood of acquiring genital warts; ACIP does not recommend HPV4 for routine use among males. This report presents the ACIP policy statement and summarizes background data. Issues reviewed by ACIP included efficacy, immunogenicity, and safety of the HPV4 vaccine in males, epidemiology of HPV and burden of HPV-associated diseases and cancers in males, cost-effectiveness of male vaccination, and programmatic considerations.

VACCINE GUIDANCE
The 3-dose series of HPV4 may be given to males aged 9 through 26 years to reduce their likelihood of acquiring genital warts. HPV4 would be most effective when given before exposure to HPV through sexual contact.


To access the full article in PDF format, go to:
http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/PDF/wk/mm5920.pdf and see pages 630-631.

To access the article in web-text (HTML) format, go to:
http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/mm5920a5.htm

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3 New: CDC publishes interim VIS for MMRV vaccine

On May 21, CDC published a new interim VIS specifically for measles, mumps, rubella, and varicella (MMRV) vaccine. This VIS is the preferred VIS for children getting MMRV vaccine, as it contains more detailed information about the risk of febrile seizures.

To access the 5/21/10 interim VIS for MMRV vaccine from the IAC website, go to: http://www.immunize.org/vis/mmrv.pdf

For information about the use of VISs, and for VISs in more than 35 languages, visit IAC's VIS web section at
http://www.immunize.org/vis

For general information about VISs from CDC's website go to:
http://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/pubs/vis

For CDC's latest news on VISs, go to
http://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/pubs/vis/vis-news.htm

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4 Check out IAC's redesigned print materials section

IAC's "Print Materials" web section has been renamed "Handouts for Patients and Staff" and totally redesigned to better serve users. To enter it, go to: http://www.immunize.org/handouts

The first thing you'll see is the organizing heart of the page, a large central box with tabs labeled Clinic Procedures, Vaccine Index, Topic Index, and Language Index running horizontally across it.

The Clinic Procedures index provides links to handouts organized by such categories as Administering Vaccines, Documenting Vaccination, Handling and Storage, and Medical Management (total of 11 categories).

Click on the Vaccine Index to be taken to links providing access to the handouts organized by vaccine (e.g., HPV, meningococcal, or pertussis; total of 20 vaccines).

The Topic Index provides links to handouts by such topics as Laws & Mandates, Dialysis, and Healthcare Personnel (total of 12 topics).

Click on the Language Index, and you'll be offered links to the 12 languages for which IAC offers handouts in translation.

Go into any of the subsections of any index, and run your mouse over the titles of the listed handouts and watch a preview of the piece pop up in the column on the right.

Finally, another useful feature of the "Handouts for Patients and Staff" web section is a link titled View All Handouts located at the bottom left edge of the central box. Click the link to be taken to sortable table that allows visitors, using up/down arrows, to sort the handouts alphabetically by title, and also by language, date, and item number.

Spend some time exploring IAC's new state-of-the-art "Handouts for Patients and Staff" web section and be sure to bookmark http://www.immunize.org/handouts for easy reference in the future.

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5 IAC develops new handout to help healthcare professionals administer pneumococcal vaccines to children

Many healthcare providers have questions about the use of the new 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV13), especially when dealing with catch-up vaccination and children with medical conditions that are indications for both PCV and pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine (PPSV23). To help answer such questions, IAC has developed a new handout, "Recommendations for Pneumococcal Vaccine Use in Children," that spells out the recommendations for every scenario.

This new resource includes three tables. The first table provides the recommended PCV13 schedule based on the child's age and PCV7 and/or PCV13 vaccination history. The second table provides the recommended schedule for administering PPSV23 vaccine to children; the third table lists the underlying medical conditions that are indications for pneumococcal vaccination among children.

To access the ready-to-print (PDF) handout "Recommendations for Pneumococcal Vaccine Use in Children," go to:
http://www.immunize.org/catg.d/p2016.pdf

IAC's Handouts for Patients and Staff web section offers healthcare professionals and the public approximately 250 FREE English-language handouts (many also available in translation), which we encourage website users to print out, copy, and distribute widely. To access all of IAC's free handouts, go to: http://www.immunize.org/handouts

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6 IAC updates "Do I need any vaccinations today?"

IAC recently revised the handout titled "Do I need any vaccinations today?" This resource is a screening tool for patients to fill out before seeing their healthcare provider. The handout was updated to include new recommendations related to influenza.

To access the revised ready-to-print (PDF) handout "Do I need any vaccinations today?" go to:
http://www.immunize.org/catg.d/p4036.pdf

IAC's Handouts for Patients and Staff web section offers healthcare professionals and the public approximately 250 FREE English-language handouts (many also available in translation), which we encourage website users to print out, copy, and distribute widely. To access all of IAC's free handouts, go to: http://www.immunize.org/handouts

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7 AAP releases policy statement on the prevention of Streptococcus pneumoniae infections in infants and children

On May 24, the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) posted the new policy statement "Recommendations for the Prevention of Streptococcus pneumoniae Infections in Infants and Children: Use of 13-Valent Pneumococcal Conjugate Vaccine (PCV13) and Pneumococcal Polysaccharide Vaccine (PPSV23)."

To access it, go to:
http://aapredbook.aappublications.org/implementation/pedsPCV13052410.pdf

IAC keeps an up-to-date, sortable list of all AAP policy statements related to immunization at http://www.immunize.org/aap

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8 IAC's Video of the Week offers a personal perspective on chronic hepatitis B virus infection

IAC encourages IAC Express readers to watch a 2.5-minute video on perinatal hepatitis B infection, produced by PKIDs (Parents of Kids with Infectious Diseases). In this moving video, a mother shares her feelings about her daughter's chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection.

Chronic infection is much more likely to develop in those who are infected in the first year of life. Approximately 90 percent of children who are infected during the first year of life will become chronically infected. Most of these infants could have been protected from HBV infection by proper prophylaxis (hepatitis B vaccine and hepatitis B immunoglobulin [HBIG]) at birth. About 1 out of 4 infected babies will die of liver failure or liver cancer as adults.

Audio and video public service announcements (PSAs) based on the 2.5-minute video are available in different formats and in 30- and 60-second lengths for use by organizations free of charge.

The link to the PKIDs web page featuring the video will be available on the home page of IAC's website through June 6. To access it, go to: http://www.immunize.org and click on the image under the words Video of the Week.

Remember to bookmark IAC's home page to view a new video every Monday. To view an IAC Video of the Week from the past, go to the video archive at http://www.immunize.org/votw

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9 Hep B Moms helps empower women so they can say, "Hep B stops with me"

Hep B Moms is a non-profit organization dedicated to preventing mother-to-child transmission of hepatitis B and safeguarding the health of infected mothers and their families.

Many pregnant mothers with chronic hepatitis B are unaware of their infection, which they may have acquired from their own mothers at birth. Like their mothers, pregnant women with chronic hepatitis B sometimes end up silently passing the virus onto the next generation.

The slogan "Hep B stops with me" is the catchphrase Hep B Moms uses to state its determination to empower women with the information they need to safeguard their own health if they are infected, and to ensure that their children neither acquire hepatitis B infection nor pass it on to another generation.

As part of its goal to prevent mother-to-child transmission of hepatitis B, Hep B Moms advocates for (1) hepatitis B vaccination for newborns at birth (as well as hepatitis B immunoglobulin [HBIG] administration for infants born to infected mothers) and (2) complete vaccination with the hepatitis B vaccine series.

As part of its current activities, Hep B Moms asks that moms pledge to do at least one of the following:

  • Vaccinate their child against hepatitis B
  • Tell a friend about hepatitis B
  • Learn more about hepatitis B and liver cancer
  • Blog about Hep B Moms

The pledge is part of the "Hep B Stops with Me" contest that Hep B Moms is sponsoring between now and June 30. The mother's written pledge, along with a photo of her child, forms a collage that promotes hepatitis B vaccination among a community of women who choose to make a difference. To view the collage, go to: http://hepbmoms.org/New_moms.php

To find out more about the contest, go to:
http://hepbmoms.org/New_moms2.php

Hep B Moms works with physicians, public health officials, and the general public to improve hepatitis B knowledge and awareness. To find out more about the organization's broad range of activities, go to: http://www.hepbmoms.org.

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10.  Interim VIS for pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV13) now available in Indonesian

Dated 4/16/10, the interim VIS for 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV13) is now available in Indonesian. IAC gratefully acknowledges DT Interpreting and Wentworth Douglass Hospital, Dover, NH, for the translation.

To access the new translation of the interim VIS for PCV13, as well as this VIS in English and other languages, go to:
http://www.immunize.org/vis/vis_pcv.asp

For information about the use of VISs, and for VISs in more than 35 languages, visit IAC's VIS web section at http://www.immunize.org/vis

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11.  CDC's Epidemiology & Prevention of Vaccine-Preventable Diseases course to be offered in Colorado, July 12-14

CDC's popular Epidemiology & Prevention of Vaccine-Preventable Diseases course will be offered in Estes Park, CO, July 12-14. For more information, go to: http://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/ed/downloads/co-brochure2010.pdf

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tel 651-647-9009  •  fax 651-647-9131
 
This website is supported in part by a cooperative agreement from the National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases (Grant No. 5U38IP000290) at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in Atlanta, GA. The website content is the sole responsibility of IAC and does not necessarily represent the official views of CDC.