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Immunization Action Coalition
IAC Express 2010
Issue number 853: March 1, 2010
Please click here to subscribe to IAC Express as well as other FREE IAC periodicals.
Contents of this Issue
Select a title to jump to the article.
  1. ACIP votes to recommend influenza vaccination for all people ages 6 months and older
  2. ACIP votes to recommend replacing Prevnar (7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine) with Prevnar 13 (13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine); FDA approves Prevnar 13
  3. WHO recommends viruses for influenza vaccines for use in the 2010-11 northern hemisphere influenza season
  4. IAC'S Video of the Week features blogger moms discussing if the vaccine-autism debate is over
  5. IAC updates six translations of "When Do Children and Teens Need Vaccinations?"
  6. IAC updates its "Quiz #1: Immunization" and "Quiz #2: Vaccine Administration"
  7. Keep vaccinating against seasonal and H1N1 influenza!
  8. CDC offers health departments and coalitions lots of resources to plan for and promote National Infant Immunization Week, scheduled for April 24-May 1
  9. "CDC Features" educates parents about Hib disease and vaccine
  10. MMWR publishes report about a case of presumptive abortive human rabies in Texas in 2009
  11. PKIDS' March 4 webinar will teach the basics of social marketing; March 11 webinar to focus on Skype and instant messaging
  12. Reminder: NFID's Clinical Vaccinology Course is planned for March 12-14 in San Diego
  13. Phacilitate's European Vaccine Forum scheduled for June 21-23 in Barcelona
 
Abbreviations
AAFP, American Academy of Family Physicians; AAP, American Academy of Pediatrics; ACIP, Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices; AMA, American Medical Association; CDC, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention; FDA, Food and Drug Administration; IAC, Immunization Action Coalition; MMWR, Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report; NCIRD, National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases; NIVS, National Influenza Vaccine Summit; VIS, Vaccine Information Statement; VPD, vaccine-preventable disease; WHO, World Health Organization.
  
Issue 853: March 1, 2010
1.  ACIP votes to recommend influenza vaccination for all people ages 6 months and older

On February 24, CDC issued a press release announcing that ACIP has voted to recommend annual influenza vaccination for all people ages 6 months and older. Portions of the press release are reprinted below.


A panel of immunization experts voted today (February 24, 2010) to expand the recommendation for annual influenza vaccination to include all people aged 6 months and older. The expanded recommendation is to take effect in the 2010-2011 influenza season. The new recommendation seeks to remove barriers to influenza immunization and signals the importance of preventing influenza across the entire population.

The Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP), which advises the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) on vaccine issues, voted on the new recommendation during its February 24, 2010, meeting in Atlanta. The vote took place against a backdrop of incremental increases in the numbers and groups of people recommended for influenza vaccination in years past, and lessons learned from the world's still-ongoing first flu pandemic in 40 years.

Prior to today's vote, ACIP recommendations for seasonal influenza vaccination--which focused on vaccination of higher risk persons, children 6 months through 18 years of age, and close contacts of higher risk persons--already applied to about 85 percent of the U.S. population. . . .

To access the complete CDC press release, go to:
http://www.cdc.gov/media/pressrel/2010/r100224.htm

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2 ACIP votes to recommend replacing Prevnar (7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine) with Prevnar 13 (13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine); FDA approves Prevnar 13

On February 24, CDC's Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) voted to recommend replacing a 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV; Prevnar) with a 13-valent PCV (Prevnar 13). Both vaccines are manufactured by Wyeth, a wholly owned subsidiary of Pfizer.

Also on February 24, FDA approved Prevnar 13 for active immunization to prevent invasive disease caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae serotypes 1, 3, 4, 5, 6A, 6B, 7F, 9V, 14, 18C, 19A, 19F, and 23F. The vaccine is indicated for use in children ages 6 months through 5 years in a four-dose schedule at ages 2, 4, 6, and 12-15 months.

FDA issued a press release to announce the approval of Prevnar 13; portions of it are reprinted below. Links to the FDA press release, approval letter, and package insert are given at the end of this IAC Express article.


The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today approved Prevnar 13, a pneumococcal 13-valent conjugate vaccine for infants and young children ages 6 weeks through 5 years. Prevnar 13 will be the successor to Prevnar, the pneumococcal 7-valent conjugate vaccine licensed by the FDA in 2000 to prevent invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) and otitis media. The new vaccine extends the protection to six additional types of the disease causing bacteria.

Prevnar 13 is approved for the prevention of invasive disease caused by 13 different serotypes of the bacterium Streptococcus pneumoniae. It also is approved for the prevention of otitis media caused by the seven serotypes shared with Prevnar. The bacterium can cause infections of the blood, middle ear, and the covering of the brain and spinal cord, as well as pneumonia. . . .


To access the complete FDA press release, click here.

To access the approval letter, click here.

To access the package insert, click here.

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3 WHO recommends viruses for influenza vaccines for use in the 2010-11 northern hemisphere influenza season

The World Health Organization (WHO) recently announced the viruses it recommends for use in the 2010-11 northern hemisphere influenza season. The announcement is reprinted below.


It is recommended that the following viruses be used for influenza vaccines in the 2010-2011 influenza season (northern hemisphere):
  • An A/California/7/2009 (H1N1)-like virus;
  • An A/Perth/16/2009 (H3N2)-like virus;**
  • A B/Brisbane/60/2008-like virus.

** A/Wisconsin/15/2009 is an A/Perth/16/2009 (H3N2)-like virus and is a 2010 southern hemisphere vaccine virus.

To access the WHO announcement, click here.

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4 IAC'S Video of the Week features blogger moms discussing if the vaccine-autism debate is over

Last month, The Lancet officially retracted its publication of Dr. Andrew Wakefield's 1998 study, which suggested a possible link between MMR vaccine and autism. Mommy blogger Daphne Brogdon gathers some of her fellow parenting bloggers to discuss if the retraction signals that the vaccine-autism debate is finally over. IAC's Video of the Week captures their discussion. The video run time is 4 minutes.

The video will be available on the home page of IAC's website through March 7. To access it, go to: http://www.immunize.org and click on the image under the words Video of the Week. It may take a few moments for the video to begin playing; please be patient!

Remember to bookmark IAC's home page to view a new video every Monday. To view an IAC Video of the Week from the past, go to the video archive at http://www.immunize.org/votw

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5 IAC updates six translations of "When Do Children and Teens Need Vaccinations?"

"When Do Children and Teens Need Vaccinations?" is a handy one-page chart for parents, illustrating all vaccines recommended for children and teens ages 0-18 years. The Arabic, Chinese, French, Korean, Russian, and Vietnamese translations were recently revised to match the most recent English version, which was updated in January to include information about human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination in males. The Spanish version was previously updated; a link to it is given below.

To access the Arabic version of the revised ready-to-print (PDF) piece "When Do Children and Teens Need Vaccinations?"
go to: http://www.immunize.org/catg.d/p4050-20.pdf

To access the Chinese version of the revised ready-to-print (PDF) piece "When Do Children and Teens Need Vaccinations?"
go to: http://www.immunize.org/catg.d/p4050-08.pdf

To access the French version of the revised ready-to-print (PDF) piece "When Do Children and Teens Need Vaccinations?"
go to: http://www.immunize.org/catg.d/p4050-10.pdf

To access the Korean version of the revised ready-to-print (PDF) piece "When Do Children and Teens Need Vaccinations?"
go to: http://www.immunize.org/catg.d/p4050-09.pdf

To access the Russian version of the revised ready-to-print (PDF) piece "When Do Children and Teens Need Vaccinations?"
go to: http://www.immunize.org/catg.d/p4050-07.pdf

To access the Vietnamese version of the revised ready-to-print (PDF) piece "When Do Children and Teens Need Vaccinations?" go to:
http://www.immunize.org/catg.d/p4050-05.pdf

To access the Spanish version the revised ready-to-print (PDF) piece "When Do Children and Teens Need Vaccinations?"
go to: http://www.immunize.org/catg.d/p4050-01.pdf

To access the English version of the revised ready-to-print (PDF) piece "When Do Children and Teens Need Vaccinations?"
go to: http://www.immunize.org/catg.d/p4050.pdf

IAC's Print Materials web section offers healthcare professionals and the public approximately 250 FREE English-language materials (many also available in translation), which we encourage website users to print out, copy, and distribute widely. To access all of IAC's free print materials, go to: http://www.immunize.org/printmaterials

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6 IAC updates its "Quiz #1: Immunization" and "Quiz #2: Vaccine Administration"

IAC recently revised its two quizzes for healthcare professionals: "Quiz #1: Immunization" and "Quiz #2: Vaccine Administration." To test your knowledge of immunization and vaccine administration, just click on the links below:

To access the revised ready-to-print (PDF) version of "Quiz #1: Immunization," go to:
http://www.immunize.org/catg.d/p7001.pdf

To access the revised ready-to-print (PDF) version of "Quiz #2: Vaccine Administration," go to:
http://www.immunize.org/catg.d/p7002.pdf

IAC's Print Materials web section offers healthcare professionals and the public approximately 250 FREE English-language materials (many also available in translation), which we encourage website users to print out, copy, and distribute widely. To access all of IAC's free print materials, go to: http://www.immunize.org/printmaterials

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7 Keep vaccinating against seasonal and H1N1 influenza!

Please continue to vaccinate patients against seasonal and H1N1 influenza. Remember: 2009 H1N1 influenza vaccine will not protect people against seasonal influenza, and seasonal influenza vaccine will not protect against H1N1 influenza.

Providers who don't have seasonal influenza vaccine or H1N1 influenza vaccine can direct patients to the Google Flu Shot Finder at http://www.google.com/flushot

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8 CDC offers health departments and coalitions lots of resources to plan for and promote National Infant Immunization Week, scheduled for April 24-May 1

National Infant Immunization Week (NIIW) is an annual observance to highlight the importance of protecting infants from vaccine-preventable diseases. It is a call to action for parents, caregivers, and healthcare providers to ensure that infants are fully immunized. This year NIIW will be held April 24-May 1 and will coincide with Vaccination Week in the Americas.

Any health department or immunization coalition interested in promoting infant immunization within their community will find abundant useful information on the CDC's NIIW website. Resources include tools for planning events and promoting them through the media; listings of NIIW activities and events planned across the nation; and educational materials for providers and parents.

To access NIIW resources, go to:
http://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/events/niiw

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9 "CDC Features" educates parents about Hib disease and vaccine

The "CDC Features" web section includes information for parents about Hib disease. "Is Your Child Protected against Hib Disease?" teaches parents about the disease, its seriousness, and the vaccine that protects against it. It also informs healthcare providers that the Hib vaccines currently available are ActHIB, Hiberix, PedvaxHIB, and Pentacel.

To access "Is Your Child Protected against Hib Disease? go to:
http://www.cdc.gov/Features/HibDisease

To access the recently updated provider resource "Q&A for Providers about the Hib Vaccination Schedule," go to:
http://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/vpd-vac/hib/faqs-hcp.htm

To access an alphabetical index of all "CDC Features," go to:
http://www.cdc.gov/az/a.html

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10.  MMWR publishes report about a case of presumptive abortive human rabies in Texas in 2009

CDC published "Presumptive Abortive Human Rabies--Texas, 2009" in the February 26 issue of MMWR. The first paragraph is reprinted below.


Rabies is a serious zoonotic disease. Recovery has been well documented in only six human patients worldwide. Five of those patients had received rabies vaccinations before illness; one had not received rabies vaccination but survived infection after prolonged intensive care. In most of these survivors, moderate to profound neurologic sequelae occurred. In all six survivors, rabies was diagnosed based on exposure history, compatible clinical symptoms, and detection of rabies virus-neutralizing antibodies (VNA). This report describes the clinical course and laboratory findings of an adolescent girl with encephalitis who had not had rabies vaccination and who had been exposed to bats 2 months before illness. Antibodies to rabies virus were detected in specimens of the girl's serum and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) by indirect fluorescent antibody test (IFA). However, the presence of rabies VNA was not detected until after she had received single doses of rabies vaccine and human rabies immune globulin (HRIG). Although the patient required multiple hospitalizations and follow-up visits for recurrent neurologic symptoms, she survived without intensive care. No alternate etiology was determined, and abortive human rabies (defined in this report as recovery from rabies without intensive care) was diagnosed. Public education should emphasize avoiding exposure to bats and other potentially rabid wildlife and seeking prompt medical attention after exposure to such animals. Rabies is preventable if rabies immune globulin and vaccine are administered soon after an exposure; however, this case also suggests the rare possibility that abortive rabies can occur in humans and might go unrecognized.

To access the full article in web-text (HTML) format, go to:
http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/mm5907a1.htm

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11.  PKIDS' March 4 webinar will teach the basics of social marketing; March 11 webinar to focus on Skype and instant messaging

PKIDS (Parents of Kids with Infectious Diseases) has scheduled a one-hour webinar for March 4. It will provide hands-on, how-to instruction on various aspects of creating a social marketing (NOT "social media") campaign. A March 11 webinar will focus on Skype and instant messaging. The webinars are part of Communications Made Easy, a PKIDS' program intended to help immunization educators learn the ropes of social marketing and traditional and social media.

SOCIAL MARKETING 101 is scheduled for March 4 at 9AM Pacific Time. Space is limited and pre-registration is recommended. To register, go to:
https://cc.readytalk.com/cc/schedule/display.do?udc=3u1dbkcpspzz

SKYPE/INSTANT MESSAGING is scheduled for March 11 at 1PM Pacific Time. Space is limited and pre-registration is recommended. To register, go to:
https://cc.readytalk.com/cc/schedule/display.do?udc=s0i6x365tqag

For more information on the Communications Made Easy program, go to: http://www.pkids.org/cme

PKIDS supports people whose children have been affected by viral hepatitis, HIV/AIDS, and other chronic, viral infectious diseases, and educates the public about effective disease prevention practices. To visit the PKIDS website, go to: http://www.pkids.org

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12.  Reminder: NFID's Clinical Vaccinology Course is planned for March 12-14 in San Diego

The National Foundation for Infectious Diseases will hold its Clinical Vaccinology Course in San Diego on March 12-14. This course focuses on new developments and issues related to the use of vaccines. Continuing education (CE) credit is available for physicians, nurses, and pharmacists.

To access comprehensive course information, including the course outline and available CE credit, go to:
http://www.nfid.org/pdf/conferences/course310.pdf

To register online, go to:
https://secure.bnt.com/webresponse/nfid/course310

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13.  Phacilitate's European Vaccine Forum scheduled for June 21-23 in Barcelona

Phacilitate, a life-sciences event planning company, has scheduled its European Vaccine Forum for June 21-23 in Barcelona. As in the past, the company's Active Immunotherapeutics Forum will run concurrently with the Vaccine Forum.

For comprehensive information on both forums, go to:
http://www.phacilitate.co.uk/pages/barcelona

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Immunization Action Coalition  •  1573 Selby Ave  •  St. Paul, MN 55104
tel 651-647-9009  •  fax 651-647-9131
 
This website is supported in part by a cooperative agreement from the National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases (Grant No. 5U38IP000290) at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in Atlanta, GA. The website content is the sole responsibility of IAC and does not necessarily represent the official views of CDC.