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Immunization Action Coalition
IAC Express 2010
Issue number 846: January 19, 2010
Please click here to subscribe to IAC Express as well as other FREE IAC periodicals.
Contents of this Issue
Select a title to jump to the article.
  1. New: 2010 U.S. Recommended Immunization Schedule for Adults is now available
  2. CDC provides information for relief workers and others traveling to Haiti
  3. CDC publishes MMWR Early Release on H1N1 influenza vaccination rates
  4. March 1 is the nomination deadline for the 2010 National Influenza Vaccine Summit's Immunization Excellence Awards
  5. CDC experts review and update IAC's online "Ask the Experts" Q&A section related to Hib
  6. IAC's Video of the Week features a Canadian PSA about influenza
  7. HHS unveils new H1N1 influenza PSA campaigns targeted toward American Indians and Alaska Natives
  8. Families Fighting Flu launches new education campaign
  9. Shot of Prevention blog offers immunization advocates a virtual place to meet
  10. Institute of Medicine releases report on chronic hepatitis B and C infection
  11. Live seasonal influenza VIS now available in Amharic
 
Abbreviations
AAFP, American Academy of Family Physicians; AAP, American Academy of Pediatrics; ACIP, Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices; AMA, American Medical Association; CDC, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention; FDA, Food and Drug Administration; IAC, Immunization Action Coalition; MMWR, Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report; NCIRD, National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases; NIVS, National Influenza Vaccine Summit; VIS, Vaccine Information Statement; VPD, vaccine-preventable disease; WHO, World Health Organization.
  
Issue 846: January 19, 2010
1.  New: 2010 U.S. Recommended Immunization Schedule for Adults is now available

CDC, AAFP, ACOG, and ACP have endorsed and released the "Recommended Immunization Schedule for Adults--United States, 2010." On January 15, CDC published the schedule in MMWR.

The MMWR article is reprinted below in its entirety, excluding two figures and references. CDC has posted downloadable versions of the 2010 U.S. Adult Immunization Schedule; links are provided at the end of this IAC Express article.


The Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) annually reviews the recommended Adult Immunization Schedule to ensure that the schedule reflects current recommendations for the licensed vaccines. In October 2009, ACIP approved the Adult Immunization Schedule for 2010, which includes several changes. A bivalent human papillomavirus vaccine (HPV2) was licensed for use in females in October 2009. ACIP recommends vaccination of females with either HPV2 or the quadrivalent human papillomavirus vaccine (HPV4). HPV4 was licensed for use in males in October 2009, and ACIP issued a permissive recommendation for use in males. Introductory sentences were added to the footnotes for measles, mumps, rubella, influenza, pneumococcal, hepatitis A, hepatitis B, and meningococcal vaccines. Clarifications were made to the footnotes for measles, mumps, rubella, influenza, hepatitis A, meningococcal, and Haemophilus influenza type b vaccines, and schedule information was added to the hepatitis B vaccine footnote.

Additional information is available as follows: schedule (in English and Spanish [a Spanish-language version is not currently available]) at  http://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/recs/schedules/adult-schedule.htm adult vaccination at http://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/default.htm ACIP statements for specific vaccines at http://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/pubs/acip-list.htm and reporting adverse events at http://www.vaers.hhs.gov or by telephone, (800) 822-7967.

CHANGES FOR 2010
Footnotes (Figures 1 and 2)
  • The human papillomavirus (HPV) footnote (#2) includes language that a bivalent HPV vaccine (HPV2) has been licensed for use in females. Either HPV2 or the quadrivalent human papillomavirus vaccine (HPV4) can be used for vaccination of females aged 19 through 26 years. In addition, language has been added to indicate that ACIP issued a permissive recommendation for use of HPV4 in males.
     
  • The measles, mumps, rubella (MMR) footnote (#5) has language added to clarify which adults born during or after 1957 do not need 1 or more doses of MMR vaccine for the measles and mumps components, and clarifies which women should receive a dose of MMR vaccine. Also, interval dosing information has been added to indicate when a second dose of MMR vaccine should be administered. Language has been added to highlight recommendations for vaccinating healthcare personnel born before 1957 routinely and during outbreaks.
     
  • The term "seasonal" has been added to the influenza footnote (#6).
     
  • The hepatitis A footnote (#9) has language added to indicate that unvaccinated persons who anticipate close contact with an international adoptee should consider vaccination.
     
  • The hepatitis B footnote (#10) has language added to include schedule information for the 3-dose hepatitis B vaccine.
     
  • The meningococcal vaccine footnote (#11) clarifies which vaccine formulations are preferred for adults aged <=55 years and >=56 years, and which vaccine formulation can be used for revaccination. New examples have been added to demonstrate who should and should not be considered for revaccination.
     
  • The selected conditions for Haemophilus influenza type b (Hib) footnote (#13) clarifies which high-risk persons may receive 1 dose of Hib vaccine.

The Recommended Adult Immunization Schedule has been approved by the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices, the American Academy of Family Physicians, the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, and the American College of Physicians.


To access the 2010 U.S. adult immunization schedule as part of a January 15 MMWR QuickGuide, go to
http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/PDF/wk/mm5901-Immunization.pdf

To access all schedules (the 2010 U.S. Child and Adolescent Immunization Schedules and the 2010 U.S. Adult Immunization Schedule), go to: http://www.immunize.org/cdc/schedules

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2 CDC provides information for relief workers and others traveling to Haiti

CDC has published a fact sheet titled "Guidance for Relief Workers and Others Traveling to Haiti for Earthquake Response" that describes steps that relief workers can take before, during, and after a trip to Haiti to stay healthy.

To access this fact sheet, go to:
http://wwwnc.cdc.gov/travel/content/news-accouncements/relief-workers-haiti.aspx

Additional related CDC resources are listed below.

Health Recommendations for Relief Workers Responding to Disasters
http://wwwnc.cdc.gov/travel/content/relief-workers.aspx

Public Health Issues and Priorities for the Haiti Earthquake
http://emergency.cdc.gov/disasters/earthquakes/healthconcerns_haiti.asp

Travel Health Warning
http://wwwnc.cdc.gov/travel/content/travel-health-warning/haiti-earthquake.aspx

CDC Emergency Twitter account
http://twitter.com/cdcemergency

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3 CDC publishes MMWR Early Release on H1N1 influenza vaccination rates

On January 15, CDC published "Interim Results: Influenza A (H1N1) 2009 Monovalent Vaccination Coverage--United States, October-December 2009" as an MMWR Early Release. The first paragraph is reprinted below.


In July 2009, the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) issued recommendations for use of the influenza A (H1N1) 2009 monovalent vaccine. Recognizing that the vaccine supply would not be ample immediately but would grow over time, ACIP identified (1) initial target groups, consisting of approximately 160 million persons, and (2) a limited vaccine subset of the target groups, initially estimated at 42 million persons (and more recently estimated at 62 million persons), to receive first priority while the 2009 H1N1 vaccine supply was limited. ACIP recommended expanding vaccination to the rest of the population as vaccine supplies increased. To estimate 2009 H1N1 vaccination coverage to date for the 2009-10 influenza season, CDC analyzed results from the National 2009 H1N1 Flu Survey (NHFS) and the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) survey, conducted during December 27, 2009-January 2, 2010, and December 1-27, 2009, respectively. The results indicated that, as of January 2, an estimated 20.3% of the U.S. population (61 million persons) had been vaccinated, including 27.9% of persons in the initial target groups and 37.5% of those in the limited vaccine subset. An estimated 29.4% of U.S. children aged 6 months-18 years had been vaccinated. Now that an ample supply of 2009 H1N1 vaccine is available, efforts should continue to increase vaccination coverage among persons in the initial target groups and to offer vaccination to the rest of the U.S. population, including those aged >=65 years. . . .

To access the full article in web-text (HTML) format, go to:
http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/mm59e0115a1.htm

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4 March 1 is the nomination deadline for the 2010 National Influenza Vaccine Summit's Immunization Excellence Awards

The nomination form for the National Influenza Vaccine Summit's Immunization Excellence Awards is now available. The awards recognize individuals and organizations that have made extraordinary contributions toward improved adult and/or childhood influenza vaccination within their communities. Awards will be presented during the National Influenza Vaccine Summit meeting May 17-19, in Tucson, AZ. The deadline for nominations is March 1, 2010.

There are four categories of recognition:

  • Overall Season Activities
     
  • Healthcare Personnel Campaign
     
  • Immunization Coalitions/Public Health/Community Campaign
     
  • Corporate Campaign

To access complete information and the online nomination form, go to: http://fs16.formsite.com/APhA/2010NIVSAwards

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5 CDC experts review and update IAC's online "Ask the Experts" Q&A section related to Hib

Vaccination experts at CDC recently reviewed and updated information on IAC's online "Ask the Experts" Q&A section about Hib disease and vaccination. All of IAC's "Ask the Experts" Q&As are reviewed and updated annually. The process is ongoing; IAC Express will inform readers as sections are reviewed and revised.

To access the revised Hib Q&As, go to:
http://www.immunize.org/askexperts/experts_hib.asp

To access the index page of "Ask the Experts" Q&As for all other vaccines, go to: http://www.immunize.org/askexperts

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6 IAC's Video of the Week features a Canadian PSA about influenza

IAC encourages IAC Express readers to watch a 30-second video on influenza created by the British Columbia Centre for Disease Control. Showing young adults coughing and getting sicker as they attempt to finish a Pictionary-style game, this PSA uses humor to remind viewers that influenza can be a serious illness.

The video will be available on the home page of IAC's website through January 24. To access it, go to: http://www.immunize.org and click on the image under the words Video of the Week. It may take a few moments for the video to begin playing; please be patient!

Remember to bookmark IAC's home page to view a new video every Monday. To view an IAC Video of the Week from the past, go to the video archive at http://www.immunize.org/votw

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7 HHS unveils new H1N1 influenza PSA campaigns targeted toward American Indians and Alaska Natives

On January 12, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) announced two new public service announcement (PSA) campaigns that urge American Indians and Alaska Natives to get vaccinated against H1N1 influenza.

One PSA series features Yvette Roubideaux, MD, MPH, Director, Indian Health Service, and Kathleen Sebelius, Secretary of HHS. These two TV and radio spots encourage American Indians and Native Alaskans to get vaccinated against influenza.

The second PSA series features Wes Studi, an American Cherokee actor who is noted for his roles in the movies Dances with Wolves, The Last of the Mohicans, Geronimo: An American Legend, and The New World. In two PSAs titled "Take 3" and "Protect the Circle of Life," Studi describes how to stop influenza viruses from spreading among native peoples and tribal nations.

To access any of these PSAs, go to http://www.flu.gov/psa and scroll to the "Help Keep Indian Country Healthy" section.

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8 Families Fighting Flu launches new education campaign

Families Fighting Flu recently launched its "Be a Flu Free Family" campaign. The educational campaign features an original animation segment, illustrating a young boy's perspective about why it's important for his family to be vaccinated against influenza.

To view the video and related campaign materials, including a downloadable coloring book, go to:
http://multivu.prnewswire.com/mnr/familiesfightflu/42001

To access the video on YouTube, go to:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=McwZcabH3co

Visit the Families Fighting Flu website at
http://www.familiesfightingflu.org

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9 Shot of Prevention blog offers immunization advocates a virtual place to meet

Shot of Prevention is a community blog where individuals, parents, medical professionals, and others can gather to discuss questions and current events regarding immunizations. The blog is edited by Amy Pisani, executive director of Every Child By Two (ECBT), and Danielle Romaguera, a mother of three who lost a child to pertussis.

Individuals with questions about vaccines may find this new blog a helpful resource. Clinicians should feel free to refer vaccine-hesitant parents and patients to Shot of Prevention at http://www.shotofprevention.com

Feel free to visit and recommend the other ECBT websites as well: http://www.ecbt.org and http://www.vaccinateyourbaby.org

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10.  Institute of Medicine releases report on chronic hepatitis B and C infection

On January 11, the Institute of Medicine (IOM) released a landmark study titled "Hepatitis and Liver Cancer: A National Strategy for Prevention and Control of Hepatitis B and C." Among the IOM report's key findings:

  • Public health resources are inadequate for chronic viral hepatitis prevention, control, and surveillance programs.
     
  • As many as 1 in 50 Americans are afflicted with chronic viral hepatitis and overwhelming majorities don't know they are infected.
     
  • Healthcare and social service providers lack knowledge and awareness about chronic viral hepatitis.
     
  • Chronic infection with viral hepatitis B and C are among the leading causes of preventable deaths worldwide.

To read the IOM hepatitis report online, go to:
http://www.nap.edu/openbook.php?record_id=12793&page=1

To purchase a hard copy of the IOM report, go to:
http://www.nap.edu/catalog.php?record_id=12793

To read a related press release from the National Viral Hepatitis Roundtable, go to:
http://www.nvhr.org/pdf/NVHR-Press-Release-on-IOM%20Report-1-11-10.pdf

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11.  Live seasonal influenza VIS now available in Amharic

The VIS for live attenuated seasonal influenza vaccine (nasal spray) is now available in Amharic (spoken in Ethiopia). IAC gratefully acknowledges the Minnesota Department of Health and the DSMA Ethiopian Orthodox Tewahedo Church Parish Nursing Program, Minneapolis, MN, for the translation.

To access the new Amharic translation for the live seasonal influenza VIS, as well as this VIS in English and other translations, go to: http://www.immunize.org/vis/vis_flu_live.asp Click on the pertinent language.

To access all available VISs for the inactivated (injectable) seasonal influenza vaccine, go to:
http://www.immunize.org/vis/vis_flu_inactive.asp

For information about the use of VISs, and for VISs in more than 35 languages, visit IAC's VIS web section at
http://www.immunize.org/vis

For general information about VISs from CDC's website go to:
http://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/pubs/vis

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This website is supported in part by a cooperative agreement from the National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases (Grant No. 5U38IP000290) at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in Atlanta, GA. The website content is the sole responsibility of IAC and does not necessarily represent the official views of CDC.