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Immunization Action Coalition
IAC Express 2010
Issue number 845: January 11, 2010
Please click here to subscribe to IAC Express as well as other FREE IAC periodicals.
Contents of this Issue
Select a title to jump to the article.
  1. Reminder: January 2010 issue of Vaccinate Adults now available online
  2. New: CDC, AAP, and AAFP release the 2010 Recommended Immunization Schedules for Persons Ages 0 Through 18 Years
  3. Check out IAC's redesigned VIS web section: it offers you speed, clarity, and convenience
  4. It's National Influenza Vaccination Week: CDC's impressive collection of resources will help you get the word out
  5. FDA approves high-dose seasonal influenza vaccine intended for use in people ages 65 and older
  6. During National Influenza Vaccination Week, you'll want to view CDC's collection of videos on seasonal and H1N1 influenza
  7. Important: While you're vaccinating against influenza, be sure to administer PPSV to all people with existing indications
  8. New for parents: ECBT's video clip collection features vaccine experts answering pressing questions about vaccination
  9. Reminder: CDC's January 28 Net Conference will cover the 2010 U.S. immunization schedules--register soon
  10. PKIDS' Communications Made Easy program helps immunization educators promote immunization to the public
  11. MMWR publishes report on patients hospitalized with H1N1 influenza at a school in Hawaii in May 2009
  12. MMWR publishes report on patients hospitalized with H1N1 influenza in New York City in May 2009
  13. February 1 is the abstract deadline for the National Conference on Immunization and Health Coalitions
  14. ACIP meeting scheduled for February 24-25 in Atlanta; February 2 is deadline for non-U.S. citizens to register
 
Abbreviations
AAFP, American Academy of Family Physicians; AAP, American Academy of Pediatrics; ACIP, Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices; AMA, American Medical Association; CDC, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention; FDA, Food and Drug Administration; IAC, Immunization Action Coalition; MMWR, Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report; NCIRD, National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases; NIVS, National Influenza Vaccine Summit; VIS, Vaccine Information Statement; VPD, vaccine-preventable disease; WHO, World Health Organization.
  
Issue 845: January 11, 2010
1.  Reminder: January 2010 issue of Vaccinate Adults now available online

The January 2010 issue of Vaccinate Adults is now available online for viewing, downloading, and printing. This special issue focuses on seasonal and H1N1 influenza vaccine recommendations and patient education.

This is the third issue of Vaccinate Adults that is online-only. Complete information about this issue is available at http://www.immunize.org/va There you will find a link for displaying and printing the entire 16-page PDF of the issue, along with a table of contents for viewing and printing individual sections of Vaccinate Adults.

All of the content of this issue of Vaccinate Adults has also been included in the January 2010 special edition of Needle Tips published on December 23, 2009. To access this issue of Needle Tips, go to: http://www.immunize.org/nt

If you would like to download the entire issue right now, go to: http://www.immunize.org/va/va25.pdf

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2 New: CDC, AAP, and AAFP release the 2010 Recommended Immunization Schedules for Persons Ages 0 Through 18 Years

CDC, AAP, and AAFP have endorsed and released the "Recommended Immunization Schedules for Persons Aged 0 Through 18 Years--United States, 2010." On January 8, CDC published the schedule as an MMWR QuickGuide; it is reprinted below in its entirety, excluding references, two figures, and a table. On January 7, CDC posted downloadable versions of the 2010 U.S. Child and Adolescent Immunization Schedules; a link is given at the end of this IAC Express article.


The Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) annually publishes an immunization schedule for persons aged 0 through 18 years that summarizes recommendations for currently licensed vaccines for children aged 18 years and younger and includes recommendations in effect as of December 15, 2009. Changes to the previous schedule include the following:
  • The statement concerning use of combination vaccines in the introductory paragraph has been changed to reflect the revised ACIP recommendation on this issue.
     
  • The last dose in the inactivated poliovirus vaccine series is now recommended to be administered on or after the fourth birthday and at least 6 months after the previous dose. In addition, if 4 doses are administered before age 4 years, an additional (fifth) dose should be administered at age 4 through 6 years.
     
  • The hepatitis A footnote has been revised to allow vaccination of children older than 23 months for whom immunity against hepatitis A is desired.
     
  • Revaccination with meningococcal conjugate vaccine is now recommended for children who remain at increased risk for meningococcal disease after 3 years (if the first dose was administered at age 2 through 6 years), or after 5 years (if the first dose was administered at age 7 years or older).
     
  • Footnotes for human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine have been modified to include (1) the availability of and recommendations for bivalent HPV vaccine, and (2) a permissive recommendation for administration of quadrivalent HPV vaccine to males aged 9 through 18 years to reduce the likelihood of acquiring genital warts.

The National Childhood Vaccine Injury Act requires that healthcare providers provide parents or patients with copies of Vaccine Information Statements before administering each dose of the vaccines listed in the schedules. Additional information is available from state health departments and from CDC at http://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/pubs/vis/default.htm Detailed recommendations for using vaccines are available from ACIP statements (available at http://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/pubs/acip-list.htm) and the 2009 Red Book. Guidance regarding the Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System form is available at http://www.vaers.hhs.gov or by telephone, (800) 822-7967.


To access the complete QuickGuide in ready-to-print (PDF) format, go to:
http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/PDF/wk/mm5851-Immunization.pdf

To access the complete QuickGuide in web-text (HTML) format, go to:
http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/mm5851a6.htm

To access CDC's downloadable versions of the three major components (for ages 0-6 years, ages 7-18 years, and the catch-up schedule) of the 2010 U.S. Child and Adolescent Immunization Schedules, go to:
http://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/recs/schedules/child-schedule.htm

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3 Check out IAC's redesigned VIS web section: it offers you speed, clarity, and convenience

IAC's VIS web section is easily the most popular single feature on our website, racking up more than 1.5 million VIS downloads in 2009 alone. Now, its main page has been redesigned to offer users an at-a-glance understanding of what is available to them. To enter it, click on this link: http://www.immunize.org/vis

The first thing you'll see is the organizing heart of the page, a large box with Vaccine Index, Language Index, and Alphabetical Index running horizontally across it.

The Vaccine Index lists all 26 VIS used in the U.S. when vaccinating patients. Click on the name of a VIS, and you'll be taken to a link to the English-language version of the VIS and all its translations.

Click on Language Index, and you'll be taken to a list of the 48 languages that IAC makes VISs available in (not every VIS is available in all 48 languages, by any means!).

Click on Alphabetical Index to be taken to an alphabetical list of VISs. If you click on the name and most recent issue date of the VIS (e.g., DTaP VIS--5/17/07), you'll be taken DIRECTLY to the English-language version of the VIS--no searching around for it! You also have the option of viewing the translated versions of the VIS.

Another useful feature of the VIS home page is the chart titled Current VIS Dates. Use it to check your stock of VISs against--some of yours may be out of date.

If you immunize, you need speedy access to VISs. So, take a few minutes now and click around on the various hyperlinks on the VIS home page. You might find a few really useful resources that you and your co-workers hadn't known about before.

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4 It's National Influenza Vaccination Week: CDC's impressive collection of resources will help you get the word out

National Influenza Vaccination Week (NIVW) is a national observance that was established to highlight the importance of continuing influenza vaccination after the holiday season into January and beyond. This year, it's scheduled for January 10-16.

CDC has produced a broad range of communication materials that drive home the message that influenza is a serious disease and vaccination is the best protection against it. Materials include posters and brochures, a media toolkit, web tools, audio and video public service announcements, ready-to-print articles, and more.

To access these materials, go to the NIVW home page at
http://www.flu.gov/news/nivw.html

If you are planning an activity during NIVW or beyond to encourage influenza vaccination, CDC would like to hear from you. Provide details about your NIVW activities at http://www.cdc.gov/flu/NIVW/form.htm

On January 8, MMWR published "Announcement: National Influenza Vaccination Week--January 10-16, 2010." To read the announcement, go to: http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/mm5851a4.htm

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5 FDA approves high-dose seasonal influenza vaccine intended for use in people ages 65 and older

On December 23, 2009, FDA issued a press release announcing that it approved sanofi pasteur's request to supplement its license application for influenza virus vaccine to include a high-dose formulation. Portions of the press release are reprinted below. The package insert and other information are posted on the FDA website; links to both are given at the end of this IAC Express article.

IMPORTANT NOTE: Fluzone High-Dose influenza vaccine will NOT be available for use during the 2009-10 influenza season.


The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today approved Fluzone High-Dose, an inactivated influenza virus vaccine for people ages 65 years and older to prevent disease caused by influenza virus subtypes A and B.

People in this age group are at highest risk for seasonal influenza complications, which may result in hospitalization and death. Annual vaccination remains the best protection from influenza, particularly for people 65 and older.

Fluzone High-Dose was approved via the accelerated approval pathway. FDA's accelerated approval pathway helps safe and effective medical products for serious or life-threatening diseases become available sooner. In clinical studies, Fluzone High-Dose demonstrated an enhanced immune response compared with Fluzone in individuals 65 and older. . . .


To access the complete press release, go to:
http://www.fda.gov/NewsEvents/Newsroom/PressAnnouncements/2009/ucm195483.htm

To access the package insert, go to:
http://www.fda.gov/downloads/BiologicsBloodVaccines/Vaccines/ApprovedProducts/UCM195479.pdf

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6 During National Influenza Vaccination Week, you'll want to view CDC's collection of videos on seasonal and H1N1 influenza

IAC encourages IAC Express readers to view several videos on seasonal and H1N1 influenza developed by CDC. Run times range from 1 to 7 minutes.

These videos will be available on the home page of IAC's website through January 17. To access them, go to: http://www.immunize.org and click on the image under the words Video of the Week. It may take a few moments for the video to begin playing; please be patient!

Remember to bookmark IAC's home page to view a new video every Monday. To view an IAC Video of the Week from the past, go to the video archive at http://www.immunize.org/votw

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7 Important: While you're vaccinating against influenza, be sure to administer PPSV to all people with existing indications

CDC advises healthcare professionals that during seasonal and H1N1 influenza outbreaks, all people who have existing indications for pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine (PPSV) should be vaccinated according to current ACIP recommendations. This is important because people with existing indications are not only at increased risk for pneumococcal disease, but are also at increased risk for serious complications from influenza.

CDC has issued related guidance titled "Prevention of Pneumococcal Infections Secondary to Seasonal and 2009 H1N1 Influenza Viruses Infection." To access it, go to: http://www.cdc.gov/h1n1flu/vaccination/provider/provider_pneumococcal.htm

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8 New for parents: ECBT's video clip collection features vaccine experts answering pressing questions about vaccination

Every Child by Two (ECBT) recently launched a new web page titled Video FAQs on its Vaccinate Your Baby website. The new web page features video clips of experts on immunization and autism briefly answering parents' most frequently asked questions about vaccination. Questions are grouped under four categories: (1) Why Vaccinate, (2) Why Follow the Recommended Immunization Schedule, (3) Vaccine Testing, Ingredients, and Safety, and (4) Vaccines and Autism. The video clips vary from 30 seconds to two minutes in length and are a valuable resource for healthcare professionals and the general public.

The experts include

  • Paul Offit, MD, Vaccine Education Center, Children's Hospital of Philadelphia
  • Mark Sawyer, MD, University of California-San Diego School of Medicine
  • Mary Beth Koslap-Petraco, DPN(c), CPNP, Suffolk County Department of Health Services, NY
  • Alison Singer, Autism Science Foundation

To access the video clips and related information, go to:
http://www.vaccinateyourbaby.org/faq

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9 Reminder: CDC's January 28 Net Conference will cover the 2010 U.S. immunization schedules--register soon

The next NCIRD live Net Conference will cover the 2010 U.S. immunization schedules for children and adults. The Net Conference is scheduled from noon to 1PM ET on January 28. William Atkinson, MD, MPH, will speak on "What's New on the Child and Adolescent Immunization Schedules," and Carol Friedman, DO, will address "What's New on the Adult Immunization Schedule." Dr. Andrew Kroger will moderate.

Participation in the Q&A section of the program is available by phone and Internet. This is a limited-entry event. Registration will close on January 26 or when the course is full.

To register, go to:
http://www2.cdc.gov/vaccines/ed/ciinc

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10.  PKIDS' Communications Made Easy program helps immunization educators promote immunization to the public

PKIDS recently launched Communications Made Easy, a fun, easy-to-understand program that will help immunization educators learn the ropes of social marketing and traditional and social media.

The program uses webinars, one-to-one tech assistance, and an eToolkit that includes templates, how-to videos, and tutorials that are intended to take the guesswork out of communications planning and make outreach more effective. As a bonus, Communications Made Easy includes admittance to a national network that connects groups and increases resource-sharing among participants, allowing dollars budgeted for outreach to go further.

For complete details about Communications Made Easy, go to: http://pkids.org/cme

Registration is necessary to take full advantage of the program. To register, go to: http://pkids.org/cme/registration

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11.  MMWR publishes report on patients hospitalized with H1N1 influenza at a school in Hawaii in May 2009

CDC published "Outbreak of 2009 Pandemic Influenza A (H1N1) at a School--Hawaii, May 2009" in the January 8 issue of MMWR. A summary made available to the press is reprinted below in its entirety.


Influenza activity in schools can serve to inform local public health officials of changing disease patterns, especially early in an epidemic; and clear, ongoing communication between education and public health authorities is especially important because guidance on school closures and other policies are updated and revised regularly.

This report summarizes an outbreak representing the first documented community transmission of pandemic H1N1 virus in Hawaii. The Hawaii Department of Health (HDOH) investigated an outbreak of pandemic H1N1 cases at a school on Oahu with a total of 16 cases identified; all patients recovered with no hospitalizations or deaths. HDOH, the school, and the Hawaii Department of Education instituted a campaign asking students and employees to stay home if ill and decided to not close the school. The findings of this investigation contributed to the early understanding of the epidemiology of H1N1 influenza in Hawaii and the role that endemic transmission would play. Influenza activity in schools can serve to inform local public health officials of changing disease patterns, especially early in an epidemic.

To access the full article in web-text (HTML) format, go to:
http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/mm5851a3.htm

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12.  MMWR publishes report on patients hospitalized with H1N1 influenza in New York City in May 2009

CDC published "Patients Hospitalized with 2009 Pandemic Influenza A (H1N1)--New York City, May 2009" in the January 8 issue of MMWR. A summary made available to the press is reprinted below in its entirety.


Public education campaigns should encourage patients at high risk for severe influenza to get vaccinated and, if infected, to seek treatment for 2009 pandemic influenza A (H1N1) soon after symptom onset. It is important that medical providers offer early antiviral therapy for children under age 2 and to patients with underlying risk conditions.

In spring of 2009, the New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene reviewed medical charts of the first 99 patients hospitalized with 2009 pandemic influenza A (H1N1). More than half (59 percent) of these patients were 17 years or younger, and most patients (74 percent) had one or more underlying medical conditions that increase risk of complications from influenza, putting them at greater risk for developing severe illness. Among hospitalized patients, 48 percent had asthma. Additionally, 60 percent of adults and 18 percent of children with recorded height and weight information were obese. Prompt treatment with antiviral medication was associated with shorter average hospital stays (2 days versus 3 days). These and other findings helped to guide control and prevention measures during the outbreak.

To access the full article in web-text (HTML) format, go to:
http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/mm5851a2.htm

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13.  February 1 is the abstract deadline for the National Conference on Immunization and Health Coalitions

The National Conference on Immunization and Health Coalitions will take place in Chicago on May 26-28. The event host is the Chicago Area Immunization Campaign.

Abstracts are being sought on many topics. The deadline for submitting abstracts is February 1; submissions must be in electronic format. To access the Call for Abstracts and the submission form, go to:
http://www.ilmaternal.org/ncihc/CallforAbstracts.pdf

The early registration fee is $260, a savings of $40 off the regular $300 registration fee. The deadline for early registration is February 12. To register online, go to:
http://www.ilmaternal.org/ncihc/registration.html

For comprehensive conference information, including information on the conference program, go to: http://www.ilmaternal.org/ncihc2010.html Click on the links in the dark purple box located in the lower right corner of the web page.

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14.  ACIP meeting scheduled for February 24-25 in Atlanta; February 2 is deadline for non-U.S. citizens to register

The Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) will hold its next meeting on February 24-25, at CDC's Clifton Road campus in Atlanta. The meeting is open to the general public.

To attend the ACIP meeting at the Clifton Road campus, ACIP attendees (participants and visitors) must register online. The online registration deadline for the February meeting for non-U.S. citizens is February 2. The deadline for U.S. citizens is February 9.

To access the online registration form, go to:
http://www2a.cdc.gov/nip/ACIP/FebruaryRegistration.asp

To access detailed information about the meeting agenda, driving directions, and other useful material, go to:
http://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/recs/acip/meetings.htm#dates

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This website is supported in part by a cooperative agreement from the National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases (Grant No. 5U38IP000290) at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in Atlanta, GA. The website content is the sole responsibility of IAC and does not necessarily represent the official views of CDC.