Home
|
About IAC
|
Contact
|
A-Z Index
|
Donate
|
Shop
|
SUBSCRIBE
Immunization Action Coalition
IAC Express 2009
Issue number 829: October 26, 2009
Please click here to subscribe to IAC Express as well as other FREE IAC periodicals.
Contents of this Issue
Select a title to jump to the article.
  1. CDC posts the provisional recommendations for use of MMRV vaccine on its ACIP web section
  2. FDA approves seasonal influenza vaccine Fluarix for use in children and teens ages 3 to 17 years
  3. President Obama signs emergency declaration for H1N1 influenza
  4. Immunization Techniques video (DVD or VHS) offers a great way to give staff high-quality vaccination instruction
  5. CDC's H1N1 information includes H1N1 billing Q&As, 10 most frequently asked H1N1 questions, and much more
  6. Set for Nov. 12, CDC's "Current Issues in Immunization" Net Conference will cover new HPV recommendations
  7. Wired magazine profiles Dr. Paul A. Offit in the context of his work to dispel autism myths
  8. Seasonal influenza vaccine pocket guides--FREE!--from the National Influenza Vaccine Summit
  9. IAC's Video of the Week features a 60 Minutes report on H1N1 influenza
  10. IAC updates a print Q&A that answers the public's questions about seasonal influenza
  11. Keep vaccinating against seasonal influenza!
  12. MMWR article reports substantial decrease in U.S. rotavirus disease since vaccine introduction in 2006
  13. VISs for seasonal influenza vaccines now available in Bengali, Haitian Creole, and Urdu
  14. Check out the Childhood Influenza Immunization Coalition's new videos, PSAs, and survey results
  15. A new Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System website has been launched
  16. "State of the World's Vaccines and Immunization" focuses on major developments since 2000
  17. MMWR article covers introduction and transmission of H1N1 influenza virus in Kenya in 2009
  18. MMWR article discusses recent progress made toward eradicating polio in Nigeria
  19. Phacilitate's North American Vaccine Forum scheduled for January 25-27 in Washington, DC
 
Abbreviations
AAFP, American Academy of Family Physicians; AAP, American Academy of Pediatrics; ACIP, Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices; AMA, American Medical Association; CDC, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention; FDA, Food and Drug Administration; IAC, Immunization Action Coalition; MMWR, Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report; NCIRD, National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases; NIVS, National Influenza Vaccine Summit; VIS, Vaccine Information Statement; VPD, vaccine-preventable disease; WHO, World Health Organization.
  
Issue 829: October 26, 2009
1.  CDC posts the provisional recommendations for use of MMRV vaccine on its ACIP web section

On October 20, CDC posted provisional recommendations for use of measles, mumps, rubella, and varicella (MMRV) vaccine on the ACIP web section. Provisional recommendations are those ACIP has voted on but that are not yet approved by CDC or the Department of Health and Human Services and have not yet been published in MMWR. The MMRV provisional recommendations are reprinted below in their entirety.


ACIP PROVISIONAL RECOMMENDATIONS FOR USE OF MEASLES, MUMPS, RUBELLA AND VARICELLA (MMRV) VACCINE

Date of ACIP vote: June 25, 2009
Date of posting of provisional recommendations: October 20, 2009

On June 25, 2009, ACIP voted on updated recommendations for use of MMRV vaccine and approved other MMRV vaccine-related guidance. The updated provisional recommendations for use of MMRV vaccine and CDC implementation guidance are listed below.

DOSE 1 AT AGES 12 THROUGH 47* MONTHS

For the first dose of measles, mumps, rubella, and varicella vaccines at ages 12 through 47 months, either MMR and varicella vaccines or MMRV vaccine can be used. Providers who are considering administering MMRV vaccine should discuss the benefits and risks of both vaccination options with the parents or caregivers. Compared with use of MMR and varicella vaccines at the same visit, use of MMRV vaccine results in one fewer injection but is associated with a higher risk for fever and febrile seizures 5 through 12 days  after the first dose among children aged 12 through 23 months* (about one extra febrile seizure for every 2,300-2,600 MMRV vaccine doses). Use of MMR and varicella vaccines avoids this increased risk for fever and febrile seizures following MMRV vaccine. Providers who face barriers to clearly communicating these benefits and risks for any reason (e.g., language barriers) should administer MMR and varicella vaccines.


DOSE 1 AT AGES 48 MONTHS AND OLDER AND DOSE 2 AT ANY AGE

For the first dose of measles, mumps, rubella, and varicella vaccines at ages 48 months and older and for dose 2 at any age (15 months through 12 years), use of MMRV vaccine generally is preferred over separate injections of its equivalent component vaccines (i.e., MMR and varicella vaccines). Considerations should include provider assessment**, patient preference, and the potential for adverse events.

Of note, the routinely recommended ages for measles, mumps, rubella and varicella vaccination continue to be 12 through 15 months of age for dose 1 and 4 through 6 years of age for dose 2.

OTHER MMRV VACCINE-RELATED GUIDANCE

New Precaution for MMRV Vaccine Use: A personal or family (i.e., sibling, parent) history of seizures is a precaution for MMRV vaccination. Studies suggest that children who have a personal or family history of febrile seizures or family history of epilepsy are at increased risk for febrile seizures compared with children who do not have such histories. Children with a personal or family history of seizures generally should be vaccinated with MMR and varicella vaccines because the risks of using MMRV vaccine in this group of children generally outweigh the benefit of MMRV vaccine.

CDC has developed materials to help with the implementation of the updated recommendations for use of MMRV vaccine:
www.cdc.gov/vaccines/vpd-vac/combo-vaccines/mmrv/vacopt.htm

* The 47 month cut-off was chosen on the basis of the epidemiology of febrile seizures: first febrile seizures are uncommon after age 4 years; approximately 94% of febrile seizures occur in children aged less than 4 years.

** Provider assessment should include the number of injections, vaccine availability, likelihood of improved coverage, likelihood of patient return, and storage and cost consideration.

This document can be found on the CDC website at:
www.cdc.gov/vaccines/recs/provisional


To access the MMRV provisional recommendations, go to:
http://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/recs/provisional/downloads/mmrv-oct2009-508.pdf

All provisional ACIP recommendations can be found at
http://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/recs/provisional

To access all final ACIP recommendations, go to: http://www.immunize.org/acip IAC's ACIP web section allows visitors to sort documents by date, vaccine, or topic. Bookmark this link for easy access to all provisional and final ACIP recommendations.

Back to top
   
2 FDA approves seasonal influenza vaccine Fluarix for use in children and teens ages 3 to 17 years

On October 19, FDA issued a press release, "FDA Approves Seasonal Influenza vaccine Fluarix for Pediatric Use." Fluarix is manufactured by GlaxoSmithKline Biologicals, Dresden, Germany. Portions of the press release are reprinted below. Links to the approval letter and package insert are given at the end of this IAC Express article.


The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today approved use of the seasonal influenza vaccine Fluarix for children ages 3 years to 17 years. Previously, this vaccine, which contains inactivated (killed) influenza A and B viruses, had been approved for use in adults, ages 18 years and older.

The safety and effectiveness of Fluarix for use in children ages 3 years and older is documented by a U.S. study comparing 2,115 children who received Fluarix with 1,210 children who received Fluzone, a different influenza vaccine already licensed by the FDA for use in children ages 6 months and older. Study results showed that children 3 years and older vaccinated with Fluarix and Fluzone produced similar amounts of antibodies in the blood at levels considered likely to be protective against seasonal influenza.

Fluarix is a seasonal influenza vaccine not intended to protect against the 2009 H1N1 influenza virus. . . .


To access the complete press release, go to:
http://www.fda.gov/NewsEvents/Newsroom/PressAnnouncements/ucm187156.htm

To access the approval letter, go to:
http://www.fda.gov/BiologicsBloodVaccines/Vaccines/ApprovedProducts/ucm187207.htm

To access the package insert, click here.

Back to top
   
3 President Obama signs emergency declaration for H1N1 influenza

On October 24, President Obama signed an emergency declaration for H1N1 influenza. The proclamation enhances the ability of our nation's medical treatment facilities to handle a surge in H1N1 patients by allowing, as needed, the waiver of certain standard federal requirements on a case-by-case basis.

To access details about the declaration, go to:
http://www.flu.gov/professional/federal/h1n1emergency10242009.html

Back to top
   
4 Immunization Techniques video (DVD or VHS) offers a great way to give staff high-quality vaccination instruction

If your healthcare setting is vaccinating a lot more people than usual because of H1N1 influenza, this is a great time for your staff to review the recommended immunization techniques shown in the video Immunization Techniques: Safe, Effective, Caring. This popular and highly lauded 35-minute video offers healthcare providers a way to train their staff--quickly, effectively, and affordably (only $10.50 for each DVD or VHS ordered).

Developed in 2001 by the California Department of Health Services Immunization Branch in collaboration with a team of national experts, the video teaches best practices for administering intramuscular (IM) and subcutaneous (SC) vaccines to infants, children, and adults. PLEASE NOTE, however, that because the video was released in 2001, it does NOT provide instruction on administering the nasal-spray influenza vaccines or the oral rotavirus vaccines. These vaccines were licensed after 2001.

Available in DVD and VHS formats, the video is designed for use as a "hands-on" instructional program for new staff, as well as a refresher course for experienced healthcare professionals. It discusses the following:

  • Anatomic sites
  • Choice of needle size
  • Vaccines and routes of administration
  • Demonstrations of infants, toddlers, kindergartners, and adults being vaccinated
  • How to "draw up" doses of vaccine

TO ORDER OR FOR ADDITIONAL INFORMATION. The cost is $10.50 per copy of the DVD or VHS.

For additional information about the DVD, or to order online or to download an order form, visit
http://www.immunize.org/shop/toolkit_iztechdvd.asp

For additional information about the VHS, or to order online or to download an order form, visit
http://www.immunize.org/shop/toolkit_iztechvhs.asp

Back to top
   
5 CDC's H1N1 information includes H1N1 billing Q&As, 10 most frequently asked H1N1 questions, and much more

CDC recently added or updated the following H1N1 influenza information for healthcare professionals.

H1N1 Vaccine Administration Billing Q&As
http://www.cdc.gov/h1n1flu/vaccination/statelocal/vaccing_billing_qa.htm

Top 10 Frequently Asked Questions on Use of Influenza A(H1N1) 2009 Monovalent Vaccines (2009 H1N1 Vaccines):  Practical Considerations for Immunization Programs and Providers
http://www.cdc.gov/H1N1flu/vaccination/top10_faq.htm

H1N1 Vaccine Allocation and Distribution Q&A
http://www.cdc.gov/H1N1flu/vaccination/statelocal/centralized_distribution_qa.htm

Updated Interim Recommendations--HIV-Infected Adults and Adolescents: Considerations for Clinicians Regarding 2009 H1N1 Influenza
http://www.cdc.gov/h1n1flu/guidance_HIV.htm

Antiviral Safety Information Web Page
http://www.cdc.gov/H1N1flu/antivirals/safety_info.htm

Health Requirements and Recommendations for Travel to Saudi Arabia during the 2009 Hajj: Information for U.S. Travelers
http://wwwnc.cdc.gov/travel/content/id/2434.aspx

Emergency Use Authorization of N95 Respirators
http://www.cdc.gov/h1n1flu/eua/n95.htm

CDC Health Alert Network (HAN) Info Service Message: Recommendations for Early Empiric Antiviral Treatment in Persons with Suspected Influenza who are at Increased Risk of Developing Severe Disease
http://www.cdc.gov/H1N1flu/HAN/101909.htm

Podcast: Antiviral Drugs for the 2009-2010 Influenza Season
http://www2c.cdc.gov/podcasts/player.asp?f=175219#

Planning Guide for Vaccinating Pediatric Patients against 2009 H1N1 Influenza in Primary Healthcare Settings
http://www.cdc.gov/h1n1flu/vaccination/pediatricpatients.htm

2009-2010 Influenza Triage Algorithm for Children (18 years or Younger) with Influenza-Like Illness
http://www.cdc.gov/h1n1flu/clinicians/pdf/childalgorithm.pdf

Recommendations for Use of Antiviral Medications for the Management of Influenza in Children and Adolescent for the 2009-2010 Season--Pediatric Supplement for Health Care Providers
http://www.cdc.gov/h1n1flu/recommendations_pediatric_supplement.htm

Updated Interim Recommendations for the Use of Antiviral Medications in the Treatment and Prevention of Influenza for the 2009-2010 Season
http://www.cdc.gov/h1n1flu/recommendations.htm

2009 H1N1 Flu (referred to as "swine flu" early on) and Seasonal Flu Information for Rheumatology Health Professionals
http://www.cdc.gov/h1n1flu/arthritis_clinicians.htm

CDC's H1N1 Flu web section contains hundreds of documents for healthcare professionals and the public. To access the web section's home page, go to: http://www.cdc.gov/h1n1flu

To make it easy for you to keep up to date with developments, IAC has gathered important information related to H1N1 influenza into a single web section. To access this resource, go to:
http://www.immunize.org/h1n1

Back to top
   
6 Set for Nov. 12, CDC's "Current Issues in Immunization" Net Conference will cover new HPV recommendations

The next NCIRD live Net Conference will cover new recommendations for human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine. An additional topic will be discussed, but it has not yet been determined. The Net Conference is scheduled from noon to 1PM ET on November 12. Dr. Lauri Markowitz will speak on HPV; Dr. Andrew Kroger will moderate. Participation in the Q&A section of the program is available by phone and Internet.

For additional information, go to:
http://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/ed/ciinc

This is a limited-entry event. Registration will close on November 10 or when the course is full. To register, go to:
http://www2.cdc.gov/vaccines/ed/ciinc

Back to top
   
7 Wired magazine profiles Dr. Paul A. Offit in the context of his work to dispel autism myths

On October 19, the website of Wired magazine posted "An Epidemic of Fear: How Panicked Parents Skipping Shots Endangers Us All." Written by Amy Wallace, the article profiles Dr. Paul A. Offit in the context of his work to dispel the myth that vaccines cause autism. A science advocate, Dr. Offit is chief of Infectious Diseases and director of the Vaccine Education Center at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia. He is also a co-inventor of the rotavirus vaccine RotaTeq.

To access the article "An Epidemic of Fear: How Panicked Parents Skipping Shots Endangers Us All," go to:
http://www.wired.com/magazine/2009/10/ff_waronscience

Earlier this month, the American Academy of Pediatrics presented Dr. Offit with its President's Certificate for Outstanding Service in recognition of his ongoing commitment to promote immunization.

To access the AAP press release about the award, go to:
http://www.aap.org/advocacy/releases/nce09outstandingaward.htm

Back to top
   
8 Seasonal influenza vaccine pocket guides--FREE!--from the National Influenza Vaccine Summit

With vaccination against 2009 H1N1 influenza underway, it is important to remember that seasonal influenza vaccination efforts must continue. To aid in these efforts, the Immunization Action Coalition is inviting IAC Express readers to place orders now for the National Influenza Vaccine Summit's 2009-10 Seasonal Influenza Vaccination Pocket Information Guides. They're free!

These laminated, 3.75 x 6.75-inch, 2-color cards serve as a convenient reference for front-line healthcare professionals who vaccinate patients. The cards provide the following information:

  • Indications, contraindications, and precautions for the injectable and intranasal seasonal influenza vaccines
     
  • Populations targeted for seasonal influenza vaccination
     
  • Dosage and route of administration for all the various seasonal influenza vaccine products
     
  • Talking points for discussing seasonal influenza vaccination with patients

See an image of the seasonal influenza vaccine pocket guide at
http://www.preventinfluenza.org/fluguide/pocketguide_flu.pdf

These pocket guides also serve as a reminder to keep giving seasonal influenza vaccine throughout the influenza season (through the spring months).

The Summit is also pleased to be able to offer pocket guides for the administration of pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine (PPSV). See an image of the PPSV pocket guide at
http://www.immunize.org/ppvguide/pocketguide.pdf

Each of these pocket guides is designed to be used by healthcare professionals only; THEY ARE NOT PATIENT HANDOUTS.

HOW TO ORDER
Each order must be for a minimum of 100 pocket guides. Place your order at http://www.preventinfluenza.org/pocketguides There is no cost for the pocket guides, shipping, or handling within the U.S. Quantities are limited, so to avoid disappointment, place your order today!

If you have questions, email admininfo@immunize.org

BACKGROUND
These pocket guides were developed by, and are being provided under the sponsorship of the National Influenza Vaccine Summit, http://www.preventinfluenza.org The Summit brings together public and private stakeholders to facilitate and promote influenza vaccination. The pocket guides are also distributed by many major medical, nursing, and pharmacist organizations, specialty societies, state health departments, Indian Health Service Area facilities, Quality Improvement Organizations, Visiting Nurse Associations, community vaccinators, and many others.

Thanks for your dedication to immunization, and don't forget to keep vaccinating against seasonal influenza through the spring months!

Back to top
   
9 IAC's Video of the Week features a 60 Minutes report on H1N1 influenza

IAC encourages IAC Express readers to watch a 9-minute video of CBS correspondent Scott Pelley's report on the H1N1 influenza. The report, which aired on October 18, looks at how H1N1 influenza is striking at young, healthy people and presents information about the federal government's plans to fight the H1N1 pandemic.

The video will be available on the home page of IAC's website through November 1. To access it, go to: http://www.immunize.org and click on the image under the words Video of the Week. It may take a few moments for the video to begin playing; please be patient!

Remember to bookmark IAC's home page to view a new video every Monday. To view an IAC Video of the Week from the past, go to the video archive at http://www.immunize.org/votw

Back to top
   
10.  IAC updates a print Q&A that answers the public's questions about seasonal influenza

IAC recently revised its Q&A patient-education print piece "Seasonal Influenza: Questions and Answers." The word "seasonal" was added to the title and throughout the piece, and very small revisions were made to incorporate changes in vaccine recommendations.

The revised piece is a ready-to-print version of some of the CDC-reviewed material located on IAC's Vaccine Information website (www.vaccineinformation.org). The website is intended for the public, health professionals, and the media.

To access the revised ready-to-print (PDF) print piece "Seasonal Influenza: Questions and Answers," go to:
http://www.immunize.org/catg.d/p4208.pdf

For a web-text (HTML) version of this and other fully formatted documents, go to: http://www.vaccineinformation.org You will be taken to a list of Q&As about vaccine-preventable diseases and the vaccines that prevent them. Click on the disease(s) of interest to you.

To access Q&As about other diseases and vaccines in ready-to-print (PDF) format, go to:
http://www.immunize.org/printmaterials/questions.asp

IAC's Print Materials web section offers healthcare professionals and the public approximately 250 FREE English-language materials (many also available in translation), which we encourage website users to print out, copy, and distribute widely. To access all of IAC's free print materials, go to:
http://www.immunize.org/printmaterials

Back to top
   
11.  Keep vaccinating against seasonal influenza!

If you're wondering if you should continue to vaccinate against seasonal influenza when H1N1 influenza vaccine becomes available, the answer is YES! The 2009 H1N1 influenza vaccine will not protect people against seasonal influenza, and seasonal influenza vaccine will not protect against H1N1 influenza.

Unfortunately, some healthcare facilities are having difficulty finding available seasonal influenza vaccine to purchase. Be assured that though vaccine may be in temporary short supply in some settings right now, supplies are expected to catch up to demand soon.

To assist providers in finding seasonal influenza vaccine available for purchase, the National Influenza Vaccine Summit supports IVATS (Influenza Vaccine Availability Tracking System). IVATS provides information about vaccine manufacturers and distributors with vaccine available for purchase. To access this information in Excel spreadsheet format, go to:
http://www.preventinfluenza.org/ivats/ivats_09_10.xls

Many resources regarding influenza disease and vaccination are available to healthcare professionals and the public. Following is a list of some of them.

To access the National Influenza Vaccine Summit website, go to:
http://www.preventinfluenza.org

To access IAC's Seasonal Influenza web section, go to:
http://www.immunize.org/influenza

To access IAC's H1N1 Influenza web section, go to:
http://www.immunize.org/h1n1

To access CDC's Seasonal Flu web section, go to:
http://www.cdc.gov/flu

To access CDC's Novel H1N1 Flu web section, go to:
http://www.cdc.gov/h1n1flu

To access IAC's print pieces related to influenza, including screening questionnaires, patient education pieces, and sample standing orders, go to:
http://www.immunize.org/printmaterials/dis_inf.asp

Back to top
   
12.  MMWR article reports substantial decrease in U.S. rotavirus disease since vaccine introduction in 2006

CDC published "Reduction in Rotavirus After Vaccine Introduction--United States, 2000-2009" in the October 23 issue of MMWR. A summary made available to the press is reprinted below in its entirety.


Rotavirus disease in U.S. children has decreased substantially since the introduction of routine vaccination of U.S. infants against rotavirus. Worldwide, rotavirus is the leading cause of severe acute diarrhea in children aged <5 years. In the United States, before introduction of a rotavirus vaccine in 2006, rotavirus caused an estimated 20-60 deaths, 55,000-70,000 hospitalizations, 205,000-272,000 emergency department visits, and 410,000 outpatient visits annually in children <5 years of age. CDC analyzed data from a national network of sentinel laboratories which showed that the 2007-08 and 2008-09 seasons were both shorter and later than during pre-vaccine seasons in 2000-2006. Although the 2008-09 season had slightly more positive rotavirus test results than in 2007-08, the number of positive test results for both seasons was substantially lower than during 2000-2006. Cases of rotavirus disease have decreased since introduction of rotavirus vaccination, but continued surveillance is needed to better characterize the impact of rotavirus vaccine.


To access the full article in web-text (HTML) format, go to:
http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/mm5841a2.htm

To access a ready-to-print (PDF) version of this issue of MMWR, go to:
http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/PDF/wk/mm5841.pdf

To receive a FREE electronic subscription to MMWR (which includes new ACIP recommendations), go to:
http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/mmwrsubscribe.html

Back to top
   
13.  VISs for seasonal influenza vaccines now available in Bengali, Haitian Creole, and Urdu

Dated 8/11/09, the interim VIS for seasonal trivalent inactivated influenza vaccine (TIV; injectable) and the VIS for seasonal live attenuated influenza vaccine (LAIV; nasal spray) are now available in Bengali, Haitian Creole, and Urdu. IAC gratefully acknowledges the New York City Department of Education and the New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene for the translations.

INTERIM VIS FOR THE SEASONAL INJECTABLE INFLUENZA VACCINE

To access the Bengali version of the interim VIS for seasonal injectable influenza vaccine, go to:
http://www.immunize.org/vis/be_flu.pdf

To access the Haitian Creole version of the interim VIS for seasonal injectable influenza vaccine, go to:
http://www.immunize.org/vis/ha_flu06.pdf

To access the Urdu version of the interim VIS for seasonal injectable influenza vaccine, go to:
http://www.immunize.org/vis/ur_flu.pdf

To access the English version of the interim VIS for seasonal injectable influenza vaccine, go to:
http://www.immunize.org/vis/2flu.pdf

NOTE: The interim VIS for seasonal injectable influenza vaccine comes in additional languages, including Spanish. To access them, go to: http://www.immunize.org/vis/vis_flu_inactive.asp Click on the link to the pertinent language.

VIS FOR THE SEASONAL NASAL-SPRAY INFLUENZA VACCINE

To access the Bengali version of the VIS for seasonal nasal-spray influenza vaccine, go to:
http://www.immunize.org/vis/be_LAIV.pdf

To access the Haitian Creole version of the VIS for seasonal nasal-spray influenza vaccine, go to:
http://www.immunize.org/vis/haliveflu06.pdf

To access the Urdu version of the VIS for seasonal nasal-spray influenza vaccine, go to:
http://www.immunize.org/vis/ur_LAIV.pdf

To access the English version of the VIS for seasonal nasal-spray influenza vaccine, go to:
http://www.immunize.org/vis/liveflu.pdf

NOTE: The VIS for seasonal nasal-spray influenza vaccine comes in additional languages, including Spanish. To access them, go to: http://www.immunize.org/vis/vis_flu_live.asp Click on the link to the pertinent language.

For information about the use of VISs, and for VISs in more than 35 languages, visit IAC's VIS web section at
http://www.immunize.org/vis

For general information about VISs from CDC's website go to:
http://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/pubs/vis

Back to top
   
14.  Check out the Childhood Influenza Immunization Coalition's new videos, PSAs, and survey results

The website of Childhood Influenza Immunization Coalition (CIIC) was recently updated with new videos, public service announcements (PSAs), and the results of a survey conducted by the National Foundation for Infectious Diseases (NFID). Details follow.

CIIC's new attention-grabbing online videos use humor to help clear up some common misperceptions among parents about influenza and the benefit of immunization for their children. Titled "Flu Funnies," the videos are available at http://www.preventchildhoodinfluenza.org/families/influenza_flu_funnies_videos.php or http://www.youtube.com/user/NFIDVideos

Through brief vignettes about a family, CIIC's PSAs illustrate the potentially devastating impact influenza has on children and the importance of immunization. They are available in English and Spanish; email CIIC@NFID.org to access them, free of charge.

As part of a CIIC effort, NFID conducted a national survey to better understand mothers' perceptions of seasonal influenza immunization. In general, mothers view seasonal influenza vaccine as safe and effective, yet misperceptions still cause some to avoid this immunization for their children. Read more at www.PreventChildhoodInfluenza.org/survey

CIIC was established by NFID. Its members represent more than 30 of the nation's leading public health, medical, patient, and parent groups committed to protecting children's health and encouraging wellness.

To access the CIIC website's homepage, go to:
http://www.preventchildhoodinfluenza.org

Back to top
   
15.  A new Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System website has been launched

A new website for the Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System (VAERS) has been launched and is available at http://www.vaers.hhs.gov VAERS is a national program co-managed by CDC and FDA to monitor the safety of all vaccines licensed in the United States.

VAERS is a passive surveillance system that collects and analyzes important information from reported adverse events that occur after vaccination. The system relies on reports from healthcare providers, vaccine manufacturers, and the general public. You may report to VAERS electronically, by mail, or fax. You can also search the VAERS database, via the website, for information and summaries on particular adverse events reported for specific vaccines. Please note that VAERS cannot determine if an adverse event was caused by a vaccine, but can help determine if further investigations are needed.

In addition, VAERS print and web material are now available on the CDC website at
http://www.cdc.gov/vaccinesafety/vaers/vaers_campaign.htm

Back to top
   
16.  "State of the World's Vaccines and Immunization" focuses on major developments since 2000

On October 21, WHO's Department of Immunization, Vaccines and Biologicals (IVB) posted a summary of the content of the recently released third edition of a report titled "State of the World's Vaccines and Immunization." The report is a collaboration among WHO, UNICEF, and the World Bank.

The IVB summary is reprinted below in its entirety. Links to the recently released report and to a related WHO press release and a related "CDC Feature" are given at the end of this IAC Express article.


The "State of the World's Vaccines and Immunization" (third edition) is a call to action to governments and donors to sustain and increase funding for immunization in order to build upon the progress made so far in meeting the global goals. It focuses on the major developments in vaccines and immunization since 2000.

Part 1 examines the impact of immunization on efforts to meet the Millennium Development Goals, especially the goal to reduce deaths among children under five. It looks at the development and use of vaccines and at the safeguards that have been put in place to ensure their safety, efficacy, and quality. It sets out the progress and challenges in meeting the immunization-related global goals. It discusses both the cost of scaling up immunization coverage to meet these goals, and efforts to ensure that the achievements are sustainable in the long term. Finally, it looks beyond 2015 to likely changes in the immunization landscape.

Part 2 describes over 20 vaccine-preventable diseases and reviews progress since 2000 in efforts to protect populations against these diseases through the use of vaccines.


To access the full report, as well as the report's executive summary in several languages, go to:
http://www.who.int/immunization/sowvi/en

To access the WHO press release about the report, go to:
http://www.who.int/mediacentre/news/releases/2009/state_immunizaton_20091021/en

To access the "CDC Feature" on the report, go to:
http://www.cdc.gov/Features/GlobalImmunizations

Back to top
   
17.  MMWR article covers introduction and transmission of H1N1 influenza virus in Kenya in 2009

CDC published "Introduction and Transmission of 2009 Pandemic Influenza A (H1N1) Virus--Kenya, June-July 2009" in the October 23 issue of MMWR. A summary made available to the press is reprinted below in its entirety.


Investigations into the initial cases of 2009 pandemic influenza A (H1N1) showed that the infectiousness of the pandemic influenza virus may be similar to that of seasonal influenza, but more studies are needed to better understand the infectiousness of the pandemic virus. Only one small retrospective study has reported a 30 percent secondary attack rate for laboratory-confirmed 2009 pandemic influenza A (H1N1) among tourists to China. Investigations into the initial cases of 2009 pandemic influenza A (H1N1) in Kenya during June-July 2009 showed an overall laboratory-confirmed secondary attack rate of 26 percent in households, which is similar to rates reported previously for seasonal influenza. However, additional studies are needed to better understand the secondary attack rates for laboratory confirmed 2009 pandemic influenza A (H1N1) in both traditional and non-traditional household settings.


To access the full article in web-text (HTML) format, go to:
http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/mm5841a1.htm

To access a ready-to-print (PDF) version of this issue of MMWR, go to:
http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/PDF/wk/mm5841.pdf

Back to top
   
18.  MMWR article discusses recent progress made toward eradicating polio in Nigeria

CDC published "Progress Toward Poliomyelitis Eradication--Nigeria, January 2008-July 2009" in the October 23 issue of MMWR. A summary made available to the press is reprinted below in its entirety.


Despite increasing commitment by the government of Nigeria to eliminating wild poliovirus transmission and some indicators of progress, all three types of poliovirus are still being transmitted and resulting in paralytic disease among children; continued sustained commitment to polio eradication activities is essential at national, state, and local levels in Nigeria. Nigeria had the world's highest burden of wild poliovirus (WPV) in 2008, with 798 (48 percent) of the 1,651 cases reported globally. During 2008-2009, Nigeria was the source of transmission of poliovirus to thirteen neighboring countries. With increased activities to interrupt WPV transmission during 2008, the number of type 1 WPV dropped substantially in the first seven months of 2009, as did the proportion of children who were reported to have never received oral polio vaccine; however, type 3 WPV cases rose, and vaccine-derived poliovirus cases also increased. With increased commitment of religious, traditional, and community leaders, as well as increased political oversight of polio vaccination activities with better implementation, more children will be protected against all three types of WPV in Nigeria.


To access the full article in web-text (HTML) format, go to:
http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/mm5841a3.htm

To access a ready-to-print (PDF) version of this issue of MMWR, go to:
http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/PDF/wk/mm5841.pdf

Back to top
   
19.  Phacilitate's North American Vaccine Forum scheduled for January 25-27 in Washington, DC

The conference planning organization Phacilitate has scheduled a North American Vaccine Forum for January 25-27 in Washington, DC. For comprehensive information on the event, go to:
http://www.phacilitate.co.uk/pages/washington_vac

Back to top

   
Immunization Action Coalition  •  Saint Paul, MN
tel 651-647-9009  •  fax 651-647-9131
 
This website is supported in part by a cooperative agreement from the National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases (Grant No. 5U38IP000290) at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in Atlanta, GA. The website content is the sole responsibility of IAC and does not necessarily represent the official views of CDC.