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Immunization Action Coalition
IAC Express 2009
Issue number 827: October 12, 2009
Please click here to subscribe to IAC Express as well as other FREE IAC periodicals.
Contents of this Issue
Select a title to jump to the article.
  1. IAC recognizes organizations with strong influenza vaccination policies for healthcare workers
  2. CDC releases revised VISs for PPSV, rabies, and shingles
  3. H1N1 influenza VISs now available in Spanish
  4. Seasonal influenza VISs now available in up to 12 translations
  5. AMA makes expedited CPT codes available for H1N1 influenza immunizations
  6. MMWR provides updated information on H1N1 2009 monovalent vaccines
  7. MMWR reports on influenza vaccination coverage
  8. ACIP posts provisional recommendations for use of anthrax vaccine adsorbed
  9. MMWR announces new system for monitoring emergency department visits for influenza-like illness
  10. CDC posts new H1N1 influenza resources for healthcare professionals and their patients
  11. Keep vaccinating against seasonal influenza!
  12. IAC updates Healthcare Personnel Vaccination Recommendations, a print resource
  13. California's EZ-IZ training is IAC's Video of the Week
  14. Order IAC's laminated U.S. immunization schedules today!
  15. Vaccine Education Center redesigns its website, adds H1N1 influenza resource for parents
  16. Attend October ACIP meeting via webcast
  17. Save the date: 13th annual Conference on Vaccine Research scheduled for April 26-28, 2010
 
Abbreviations
AAFP, American Academy of Family Physicians; AAP, American Academy of Pediatrics; ACIP, Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices; AMA, American Medical Association; CDC, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention; FDA, Food and Drug Administration; IAC, Immunization Action Coalition; MMWR, Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report; NCIRD, National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases; NIVS, National Influenza Vaccine Summit; VIS, Vaccine Information Statement; VPD, vaccine-preventable disease; WHO, World Health Organization.
  
Issue 827: October 12, 2009
1.  IAC recognizes organizations with strong influenza vaccination policies for healthcare workers

IAC recently launched an Honor Roll for Patient Safety. It recognizes organizations and government entities that excel in protecting patients through strong influenza vaccination policies for healthcare workers. The following press release, dated October 12, announces the creation of the Honor Roll.


PATIENT SAFETY CLARION CALL: HONORING MANDATORY INFLUENZA VACCINATION FOR HEALTHCARE WORKERS

In recognition of the hospitals, professional organizations, and government entities who have sounded a clarion call for patient safety by strengthening mandatory influenza vaccination policies for healthcare workers, the Immunization Action Coalition (IAC; http://www.immunize.org) announces its online "Honor Roll for Patient Safety." (http://www.immunize.org/laws/influenzahcw.asp) The Honor Roll serves as a repository of model mandates that could be adopted by other organizations seeking to enhance patient safety.

"We hope that the Honor Roll will grow to include thousands of organizations who become part of the movement to protect patients through truly mandatory influenza vaccination policies," said Deborah L. Wexler, MD, IAC's executive director.

Vaccination is one of the most effective ways to prevent influenza transmission in healthcare settings, but U.S. healthcare worker influenza vaccination rates have only reached 50 percent. Key elements of the stronger policies that have recently been initiated in some healthcare settings are the inclusion of barrier measures to prevent influenza transmission and the discontinuation of policies that allowed workers to exempt themselves from influenza vaccination because of their personal beliefs.

To be included in the Honor Roll for Patient Safety, an organization's mandate must require influenza vaccination for employees and must include serious measures to prevent transmission of influenza to patients from workers who cannot or will not get vaccinated. Such measures might include a mask requirement, reassignment to non-patient-care duties, or dismissal of the employee.

According to bioethicist Arthur Caplan, PhD, director of the Center for Bioethics at the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia, "If you can get close to 100 percent vaccination rates [among healthcare workers] you can cut patient death rates from flu by 40 percent."

Dr. Caplan has resolutely promoted universal healthcare worker vaccination as a patient safety issue. IAC applauds his ethical leadership as well as the work of Gregory A. Poland, MD, MACP, FIDSA, Department of Medicine, Infectious Diseases, Mayo Clinic and Foundation in Rochester, Minnesota. Dr. Poland's research has significantly heightened the healthcare community's awareness of the importance of healthcare workers being vaccinated against influenza.

The Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA) has issued an authoritative policy statement on influenza vaccination for healthcare workers (Pandemic and Seasonal Influenza Principles for U.S. Action; http://www.idsociety.org/influenza.htm). On September 30, 2009, IDSA updated its policy to include 2009 H1N1 influenza vaccine; to disallow declination for personal reasons; and to specify the steps that should be taken to protect patients from being infected by unimmunized healthcare workers.

In a recent editorial ("Health workers must get flu shot or quit," published online at MSNBC.com, October 8, 2009; http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/33210502/ns/health-health_care), Dr. Caplan says patient safety trumps personal beliefs: "Enough already with the whining, moaning, demonstrating, and protesting by healthcare workers. Doctors, nurses, respiratory therapists, nurses' aides, and anyone else who has regular contact with patients ought to be required to get a flu shot or find another line of work."

IAC recognizes the following healthcare institutions on the Honor Roll for Patient Safety: Barnes Jewish Corporation (BJC) HealthCare, Missouri; Children's Hospital of Philadelphia; Creighton University, Omaha; Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania; Loyola University Health System, Illinois; MedStar Health, Maryland and Washington, DC; TriHealth, Good Samaritan and Bethesda North Hospitals, Cincinnati; University of Iowa Hospitals; and Virginia Mason Medical Center, Seattle.

In addition, IAC names IDSA to the Honor Roll, as well as the State of New York for creating an influenza vaccine mandate that applies to hundreds of healthcare institutions in the state, and the U.S. Department of Defense for its policy requiring all personnel in military healthcare facilities to be vaccinated against influenza.

Clinics, hospitals, professional organizations, and states that have implemented mandatory influenza vaccination policies for healthcare workers may nominate themselves for inclusion on the Honor Roll for Patient Safety by submitting this online application form (http://www.immunize.org/laws/mandates.aspx).

The Immunization Action Coalition (IAC; http://www.immunize.org) creates and distributes educational materials for healthcare professionals and the public that enhance the delivery of safe and effective immunization services. IAC also facilitates communication about the safety, efficacy, and use of vaccines within the broad immunization community of patients, parents, healthcare organizations, and government health agencies. Since 1995, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has been a major financial supporter of IAC for the purpose of educating healthcare professionals about U.S. vaccine recommendations. IAC's website (www.immunize.org) is designated by the World Health Organization as one of 30 international vaccine safety websites (http://www.who.int/immunization_safety/safety_quality/approved_vaccine_safety_websites/en) meeting credibility and content good information practices criteria.


To access the press release on the IAC website, go to:
http://www.immunize.org/press/pr_honorroll.asp

To access a ready-to-print (PDF) version of the press release, go to:
http://www.immunize.org/press/pr_honorroll.pdf

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2 CDC releases revised VISs for PPSV, rabies, and shingles

On October 6, CDC released revised VISs for pneumococcal polysaccharide (PPSV), rabies, and shingles vaccines. Specifics about the changes follow.

PPSV VIS
The paragraph on pregnancy under Section 5 of the PPSV VIS has received a minor update. In the previous edition the term "is not recommended" was used in a way that could be misinterpreted to mean "should never be given." In fact, while PPSV is not routinely recommended for pregnant women it may be given under some circumstances. The previous edition may be used until stocks are depleted.

To access a ready-to-print (PDF) version of the updated PPSV VIS, go to:
http://www.immunize.org/vis/pneum3.pdf

Rabies VIS
The rabies VIS was updated primarily to incorporate the new 4-dose post-exposure regimen, but also to make minor updates throughout.

To access a ready-to-print (PDF) version of the updated rabies VIS, go to:
http://www.immunize.org/vis/rabies06.pdf

Shingles VIS
The shingles VIS was changed slightly: the main reason was to remove active, untreated tuberculosis as a contraindication which had been erroneously included in the previous editions. Several other minor updates were also made. Existing stocks may be used up, but patients should be made aware of this change when appropriate.

To access a ready-to-print (PDF) version of the updated shingles VIS, go to:
http://www.immunize.org/vis/shingles.pdf

NOTE: When IAC updates an existing VIS PDF file, we often maintain the same web address (URL) for the piece. Because some users' systems have retained a local copy of the previous version of the VIS, those users may be presented with the old VIS file when bringing it up in their browsers. This problem can often be fixed by hitting "refresh" or "reload" in one's browser. If that doesn't work, try clearing the browser's temporary internet files and then hitting "refresh" or "reload."

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3 H1N1 influenza VISs now available in Spanish

The 2009-10 VISs for H1N1 monovalent inactivated influenza vaccine and H1N1 live attenuated influenza vaccine (LAIV) are now available in Spanish on IAC's website. IAC gratefully acknowledges the California Department of Public Health, Immunization Branch, for the translations.

For the Spanish-language version of the VIS for H1N1 monovalent inactivated influenza vaccine, go to:
http://www.immunize.org/vis/sp_h1n1_inact.pdf

For the English-language version of the VIS for H1N1 monovalent inactivated influenza vaccine, go to:
http://www.immunize.org/vis/h1n1_inactiveflu.pdf

For the Spanish-language version of the VIS for H1N1 LAIV, go to:
http://www.immunize.org/vis/sp_h1n1_live.pdf

For the English-language version of the VIS for H1N1 LAIV, go to:
http://www.immunize.org/vis/h1n1_liveflu.pdf

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4 Seasonal influenza VISs now available in up to 12 translations

The 2009-10 VISs for seasonal trivalent inactivated influenza vaccine (TIV; injectable) and live attenuated influenza vaccine (LAIV; nasal spray) are now available in Arabic, Armenian, Cambodian, Chinese, Farsi, Korean, Vietnamese, and Tagalog. IAC gratefully acknowledges the California Department of Public Health, Immunization Branch, for the translations. Also, the VIS for injectable seasonal influenza vaccine is available in four additional languages, and the VIS for seasonal nasal-spray influenza vaccine is available in two additional languages. URLs to all translations are given below.

For the Arabic-language version of the VIS for seasonal TIV, go to:
http://www.immunize.org/vis/ab_flu06.pdf

For the Armenian-language version of the VIS for seasonal TIV, go to:
http://www.immunize.org/vis/ar_flu06.pdf

For the Cambodian-language version of the VIS for seasonal TIV, go to:
http://www.immunize.org/vis/ca_flu04.pdf

For the Chinese language version of the VIS for seasonal TIV, go to:
http://www.immunize.org/vis/ch_flu06.pdf

For the Farsi-language version of the VIS for seasonal TIV, go to:
http://www.immunize.org/vis/fa_flu.pdf

For the Korean-language version of the VIS for seasonal TIV, go to:
http://www.immunize.org/vis/ko_flu06.pdf

For the Vietnamese-language version of the VIS for seasonal TIV, go to:
http://www.immunize.org/vis/vn_flu06.pdf

For the Tagalog-language version of the VIS for seasonal TIV, go to:
http://www.immunize.org/vis/ta_flu06.pdf

For the Arabic-language version of the VIS for seasonal LAIV, go to:
http://www.immunize.org/vis/abLAIV06.pdf

For the Armenian-language version of the VIS for seasonal LAIV, go to:
http://www.immunize.org/vis/arLAIV06.pdf

For the Cambodian-language version of the VIS for seasonal LAIV, go to:
http://www.immunize.org/vis/caLAIV04.pdf

For the Chinese language version of the VIS for seasonal LAIV, go to:
http://www.immunize.org/vis/chLAIV06.pdf

For the Farsi-language version of the VIS for seasonal LAIV, go to:
http://www.immunize.org/vis/faLAIV.pdf

For the Korean-language version of the VIS for seasonal LAIV, go to:
http://www.immunize.org/vis/koLAIV06.pdf

For the Vietnamese-language version of the VIS for seasonal LAIV, go to:
http://www.immunize.org/vis/vnLAIV06.pdf

For the Tagalog-language version of the VIS for seasonal LAIV, go to:
http://www.immunize.org/vis/taLAIV06.pdf

We have announced the availability of Spanish, Portuguese, Thai, and Turkish translations of the VIS for seasonal TIV in previous issues of IAC Express.

For the Spanish-language version of the VIS for seasonal TIV, go to:
http://www.immunize.org/vis/spflu06.pdf

For the Portuguese-language version of the VIS for seasonal TIV, go to:
http://www.immunize.org/vis/pr_flu06.pdf

For the Thai-language version of the VIS for seasonal TIV, go to:
http://www.immunize.org/vis/th_flu06.pdf

For the Turkish-language version of the VIS for seasonal TIV, go to:
http://www.immunize.org/vis/tu_flu06.pdf

For the English-language version of the VIS for seasonal TIV, go to:
http://www.immunize.org/vis/2flu.pdf

We have announced the availability of Spanish and Portuguese translations of the VIS for seasonal LAIV influenza vaccine in previous issues of IAC Express.

For the Spanish-language version of the VIS for seasonal LAIV, go to:
http://www.immunize.org/vis/spliveflu06.pdf

For the Portuguese-language version of the VIS for seasonal LAIV, go to:
http://www.immunize.org/vis/prliveflu06.pdf

For the English-language version of the VIS for seasonal LAIV, go to:
http://www.immunize.org/vis/liveflu.pdf

More translations of the seasonal and H1N1 influenza VISs will be coming soon. IAC relies on other organizations to provide translations of VISs; though we cannot guarantee any delivery date, we post all translations on our website as soon as they become available.

For information about the use of VISs, and for VISs in more than 35 languages, visit IAC's VIS web section at
http://www.immunize.org/vis

For general information about VISs from CDC's website go to:
http://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/pubs/vis

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5 AMA makes expedited CPT codes available for H1N1 influenza immunizations

The American Medical Association (AMA) recently posted the following information to its website.


CPT CODES FOR 2009 H1N1 INFLUENZA IMMUNIZATIONS

With both seasonal influenza and H1N1 influenza circulating this flu season, the American Medical Association (AMA) announced it has expedited the publication of a new code specific to vaccine administration and revised existing code 90663 to include the H1N1 vaccine.

The new Current Procedural Terminology (CPT) code issued by the AMA will streamline reporting and the reimbursement procedure for physicians and healthcare providers who are expected to administer nearly 200 million doses of the H1N1 vaccine in the United States. The codes will also help to efficiently report and track immunization and counseling services related to the H1N1 vaccine throughout the healthcare system.

The codes are as follows:
  • 90470: H1N1 immunization administration (intramuscular, intranasal), including counseling when performed
     
  • 90663: Influenza virus vaccine, pandemic formulation, H1N1

How to Bill for Administration of 2009 H1N1 Influenza Vaccination

The new CPT codes detailed above are effective immediately.

To seek payment from payers following administration of 2009 H1N1 influenza type A monovalent vaccine, providers should bill CPT code 90663 (Influenza virus vaccine, pandemic formulation, H1N1) in conjunction with the immunization administration code 90470 (H1N1 immunization administration (intramuscular, intranasal), including counseling when performed). The 90663 code for the 2009 H1N1 vaccine itself should be billed for zero dollars, since the vaccine is provided free of charge by the federal government. Providers will be paid for 2009 H1N1 vaccine administration.


To access the information directly from the AMA website, go to:
http://www.ama-assn.org/ama/pub/h1n1/resources/cpt-codes.shtml

Visit http://www.amaH1N1info.org for up-to-date information and resources, tailored for physicians, on seasonal and 2009 H1N1 influenza.

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6 MMWR provides updated information on H1N1 2009 monovalent vaccines

CDC published "Update on Influenza A (H1N1) 2009 Monovalent Vaccines" in the October 9 issue of MMWR. The first, second, and last paragraphs are reprinted below. The article includes an important table of all the influenza A (H1N1) 2009 monovalent vaccines approved for use in the United States, showing vaccine type, manufacturer, presentation, mercury content, approved age group, number of doses, and route. A link to the table is provided after the article excerpt.


On September 15, 2009, four influenza vaccine manufacturers received approval from the Food and Drug Administration for use of influenza A (H1N1) 2009 monovalent influenza vaccines in the prevention of influenza caused by the 2009 pandemic influenza A (H1N1) virus. Both live, attenuated and inactivated influenza A (H1N1) 2009 monovalent vaccine formulations are available; each contains the strain A/California/7/2009(H1N1)pdm. None of the approved influenza A 2009 (H1N1) monovalent vaccines or seasonal influenza vaccines contains adjuvants. CDC's Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices has made recommendations previously for which persons should be the initial targets for immunization with influenza A (H1N1) 2009 monovalent vaccines and has issued guidelines on decisions for expansion of vaccination efforts to other population groups. Children aged 6 months-9 years receiving influenza A (H1N1) 2009 monovalent vaccines should receive 2 doses, with doses separated by approximately 4 weeks; persons aged >=10 years should receive 1 dose.

The approved age groups for use of inactivated influenza A (H1N1) monovalent influenza vaccines differ by manufacturer. Three manufacturers that produce inactivated vaccines approved for prevention of seasonal influenza also produce formulations of influenza A (H1N1) 2009 monovalent influenza vaccines. Vaccine produced by CSL Limited is approved for use in persons aged >=18 years, vaccine produced by Novartis Vaccines and Diagnostics Limited is approved for persons aged >=4 years, and vaccine produced by sanofi pasteur, Inc. is approved for persons aged >=6 months. A live attenuated influenza vaccine (LAIV) manufactured by MedImmune LLC is approved for persons aged 2-49 years. The 2009 (H1N1) monovalent LAIV has the same age range for use as the seasonal LAIV and should not be used to vaccinate children aged <2 years, adults aged >49 years, pregnant women, persons with underlying medical conditions that confer a higher risk for influenza complications, or children aged <5 years old with one or more episodes of wheezing in the past year. . . .

Influenza activity attributed to 2009 H1N1 viruses has increased during September 2009 and is expected to continue through the fall and winter influenza season. Surveillance data indicate that the 2009 H1N1 viruses have not undergone substantial antigenic change since they were first characterized in April 2009 and should be well-matched to the monovalent vaccine strain. Influenza A (H1N1) 2009 monovalent vaccines will be available in many areas by mid-October. Vaccines against seasonal influenza are available now, and immunization programs and providers should begin or continue administering seasonal influenza vaccines as recommended. Additional data from clinical trials will be available over the coming weeks, and immunization providers should periodically look for updates on use of influenza A (2009) H1N1 monovalent vaccines at http://www.cdc.gov/flu


To access the complete article in web-text (HTML) format, go to:
http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/mm5839a3.htm

To access the table of all the influenza A (H1N1) 2009 monovalent vaccines approved for use in the United States go to:
http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/mm5839a3.htm#tab

To access a ready-to-print (PDF) version of this issue of MMWR, go to:
http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/PDF/wk/mm5839.pdf

To receive a FREE electronic subscription to MMWR (which includes new ACIP recommendations), go to:
http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/mmwrsubscribe.html

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7 MMWR reports on influenza vaccination coverage

CDC published "Influenza Vaccination Coverage Among Children and Adults--United States, 2008-09 Influenza Season" in the October 9 issue of MMWR. The first paragraph is reprinted below.


Before 2008, the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) had recommended annual vaccination for influenza for persons aged >=50 years, 18-49 years at higher risk for influenza complications, and 6 months-4 years. In 2008, ACIP expanded the recommendations to include all children aged 5-18 years, beginning with the 2008-09 season, if feasible, but no later than the 2009-10 season. This expansion added 26 million children and adolescents to groups recommended for routine influenza vaccination. To assess vaccination uptake among children and adults during the 2008-09 influenza season, CDC analyzed data from the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) in 19 states, which represent 43% of the U.S. population. This report summarizes the results of the analysis, which indicated that reported influenza vaccination coverage of >=1 doses was 40.9 percent for ages 6-23 months, 32.0 percent for 2-4 years, and 20.8 percent for 5-17 years. Among adults, reported coverage was 32.1 percent for persons aged 18-49 years with high-risk conditions, 42.3 percent for persons 50-64 years, and 67.2 percent for persons >=65 years. These results are consistent with previous studies that have found no significant increases in vaccination coverage for any of these age groups over previous seasons. These 2008-09 season estimates provide a baseline for assessing implementation of the 2008 recommendation for school-aged children. Attaining higher coverage rates likely will require additional vaccination programs in schools and expanded vaccination services in provider offices. . . .


To access the full article in web-text (HTML) format, go to:
http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/mm5839a1.htm

To access a ready-to-print (PDF) version of this issue of MMWR, go to:
http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/PDF/wk/mm5839.pdf

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8 ACIP posts provisional recommendations for use of anthrax vaccine adsorbed

On October 5, ACIP posted Provisional Recommendations for Use of Anthrax Vaccine Adsorbed online.

To access these provisional recommendations, go to:
http://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/recs/provisional/downloads/anthrax-vax-oct2009-508.pdf

To access all ACIP's provisional recommendations, go to:
http://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/recs/provisional/default.htm

To access all finalized ACIP recommendations, go to: http://www.immunize.org/acip IAC's ACIP web section allows visitors to sort documents by date, vaccine, or topic. Bookmark this link for easy access to all provisional and final ACIP recommendations.

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9 MMWR announces new system for monitoring emergency department visits for influenza-like illness

CDC published "Announcement: New System for Monitoring Emergency Department Visits for Influenza-Like Illness" in the October 9 issue of MMWR. The article is reprinted below in its entirety.


CDC has partnered with the International Society for Disease Surveillance and the Public Health Informatics Institute to enhance surveillance for influenza-like illness (ILI) through a system called "Distribute." The Distribute system aggregates information from hospital emergency department (ED) syndromic surveillance systems operated by state and local health departments; the name reflects the shared and distributed responsibilities for developing and managing the system.

This new ILI surveillance system complements the existing CDC influenza surveillance systems by providing further characterization of geographic- and age-specific trends. The number of states or local areas represented on the Distribute web page will increase over time as additional health departments participate in the Distribute system. Information on trends in ILI ED visits from the participating health departments is available at http://www.ISDSDistribute.org


To access the article in web-text (HTML) format, go to:
http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/mm5839a5.htm

To access a ready-to-print (PDF) version of this issue of MMWR, go to:
http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/PDF/wk/mm5839.pdf

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10.  CDC posts new H1N1 influenza resources for healthcare professionals and their patients

CDC has recently posted valuable new H1N1 influenza resources for healthcare providers and their patients on its website.

FOR HEALTHCARE AND ADMINISTRATIVE PROFESSIONALS

H1N1 Clinicians Questions and Answers
http://www.cdc.gov/h1n1flu/vaccination/clinicians_qa.htm

Questions and Answers on 2009 H1N1 Vaccine Financing
http://www.cdc.gov/H1N1flu/vaccination/statelocal/vaccine_financing.htm

Template Letter for Healthcare Providers about the Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System (VAERS)
http://www.cdc.gov/H1N1flu/vaccination/statelocal/letter_template_HCP.htm

Healthcare Providers and Facilities--Decision Tree for 2009 H1N1 Vaccination
http://www.cdc.gov/H1N1flu/vaccination/decisiontree.htm

2009-2010 Influenza Season Triage Algorithm for Adults (>18 Years) With Influenza-Like Illness
http://www.cdc.gov/h1n1flu/clinicians/pdf/adultalgorithm.pdf

FOR PATIENTS AND PARENTS

CDC has developed a number of new plain language resources on seasonal and H1N1 influenza, including the following.

Seasonal and Novel H1N1 Flu: A Guide for Parents (brochure)
http://www.cdc.gov/flu/freeresources/2009-10/pdf/pan_flu.pdf

CDC says "Take 3" Steps to Fight the Flu (brochure)
English:
http://www.cdc.gov/flu/freeresources/2009-10/pdf/h1n1_take3.pdf

Spanish:
http://www.cdc.gov/flu/freeresources/2009-10/pdf/h1n1_take3_sp.pdf

2009 H1N1 and Seasonal Flu: What to do if you get sick (flyer)
http://www.cdc.gov/flu/freeresources/2009-10/pdf/what_to_do_if_you_get_sick.pdf

Children Need Flu Vaccine--Including H1N1 (poster)
http://www.cdc.gov/flu/freeresources/2009-10/pdf/f_parents_pr.pdf

I'll protect my baby (poster; photo of father)
http://www.cdc.gov/flu/freeresources/2009-10/pdf/f_dad-baby_print.pdf

I'll protect my baby (poster; photo of mother)
http://www.cdc.gov/flu/freeresources/2009-10/pdf/f_mom-baby_print.pdf

My Little Girl Has Diabetes (poster)
http://www.cdc.gov/flu/freeresources/2009-10/pdf/f_diabetes_print.pdf

My Little Boy Has Asthma (poster)
http://www.cdc.gov/flu/freeresources/2009-10/pdf/f_asthma_print.pdf

I Can't Cover My Shift (poster: targeted to healthcare workers)
http://www.cdc.gov/flu/freeresources/2009-10/pdf/f_healthcare_provider_print.pdf

Why didn't I get my flu vaccine? (poster; workplace orientation)
http://www.cdc.gov/flu/freeresources/2008-09/pdf/m_worksite_8.5x11.pdf

"Take Three" Actions to Fight the Flu (poster)
http://www.cdc.gov/flu/freeresources/2009-10/pdf/take3_poster.pdf

For more up-to-date guidance and resources, go to CDC's H1N1 influenza website at
http://www.cdc.gov/H1N1flu

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11.  Keep vaccinating against seasonal influenza!

If you're wondering if you should continue to vaccinate against seasonal influenza once H1N1 influenza vaccine becomes available, the answer is YES! The 2009 H1N1 influenza vaccine will not protect people against seasonal influenza, and seasonal influenza vaccine will not protect against H1N1 influenza.

Unfortunately, some healthcare facilities are having difficulty finding available vaccine to purchase. Be assured that though seasonal influenza vaccine may be in temporary short supply in some settings right now, supplies are expected to catch up to demand soon.

To assist providers in finding seasonal influenza vaccine available for purchase, the National Influenza Vaccine Summit supports IVATS (Influenza Vaccine Availability Tracking System). IVATS provides information about vaccine manufacturers and distributors with vaccine available for purchase. To access this information in Excel spreadsheet format, go to:
http://www.preventinfluenza.org/ivats/ivats_09_10.xls

Many resources regarding influenza disease and vaccination are available to healthcare professionals and the public. Following is a list of some of them.

To access the National Influenza Vaccine Summit website, go to:
http://www.preventinfluenza.org

To access IAC's Seasonal Influenza web section, go to:
http://www.immunize.org/influenza

To access IAC's H1N1 Influenza web section, go to:
http://www.immunize.org/h1n1

To access CDC's Seasonal Flu web section, go to:
http://www.cdc.gov/flu

To access CDC's Novel H1N1 Flu web section, go to:
http://www.cdc.gov/h1n1flu

To access IAC's print pieces related to influenza, including screening questionnaires, patient education pieces, and sample standing orders, go to:
http://www.immunize.org/printmaterials/dis_inf.asp

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12.  IAC updates Healthcare Personnel Vaccination Recommendations, a print resource

IAC has updated its resource titled "Healthcare Personnel Vaccination Recommendations." The piece was updated to reflect new recommendations for MMR and influenza vaccination for healthcare personnel, as well as incorporating minor edits.

To access the revised "Healthcare Personnel Vaccination Recommendations," go to:
http://www.immunize.org/catg.d/p2017.pdf

IAC's Print Materials web section offers healthcare professionals and the public approximately 250 FREE English-language materials (many also available in translation), which we encourage website users to print out, copy, and distribute widely. To access all of IAC's free print materials, go to:
http://www.immunize.org/printmaterials

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13.  California's EZ-IZ training is IAC's Video of the Week

IAC encourages IAC Express readers to participate in an online training program that teaches healthcare professionals how to prepare and administer vaccines. Sponsored by California's EZ-IZ Training, the self-paced interactive lessons include video demonstrations and practice exercises. Combine this training with hands-on practice activities to get your staff ready for seasonal influenza and novel H1N1.

The link to this training opportunity will be available on the home page of IAC's website through October 18. To access it, go to: http://www.immunize.org and click on the image under the words Video of the Week. You will be directed to a page of additional information. Registration is required, but the training is free.

After October 18, you will still be able to access this training from the EZ-IZ web page at
http://www.eziz.org/pages/eziz_training.html

You can access other free resources from EZ-IZ at http://www.eziz.org EZ-IZ is a program of the California Vaccines for Children (VFC) Program.

Remember to bookmark IAC's home page to view a new video every Monday. To view an IAC Video of the Week from the past, go to the video archive at http://www.immunize.org/votw

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14.  Order IAC's laminated U.S. immunization schedules today!

IAC has two laminated immunization schedules for 2009--one for children/teens ages 0 through 18 years and one for adults. Based on CDC's 2009 immunization schedules, the laminated schedules offer two significant advantages over paper schedules:

(1) They are covered with a tough, washable coating that lets them stand up to a year's worth of use as guides to immunization and as teaching tools you can use to give patients and parents authoritative immunization information.

(2) Each schedule includes a guide to vaccine contraindications and precautions, a feature that will help you to make on-the-spot determinations about vaccinating patients of any age.

IAC's laminated schedules come complete with essential footnotes and are printed in color for easy reading. Each schedule has six pages (i.e., three double-sided pages), and when folded, measures 8.5" x 11".

An image of each schedule is available, as is specific information about each, and a downloadable order form and online ordering information.

To access an image of the child/teen schedule and related information, go to:
http://www.immunize.org/shop/schedule_child.asp

To access an image of the adult schedule and related information, go to:
http://www.immunize.org/shop/schedule_adult.asp

Prices start at $10 each for 1-4 copies and drop to $6.50 each for 5-19 copies. Discount pricing is available for 20 or more copies. For quotes on customizing or placing orders in excess of 999 schedules, call (651) 647-9009 or email mailto:admininfo@immunize.org

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15.  Vaccine Education Center redesigns its website, adds H1N1 influenza resource for parents

The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia recently redesigned their website, including the Vaccine Education Center (VEC) and Parents PACK portions. The changes were done to make these sections easier for users to navigate.

Unfortunately, only the home page links have remained the same, so if your organization links to any of VEC's resources, the links are likely to be broken.

Check out the redesigned VEC web section and bookmark the new URLs by going to http://www.vaccine.chop.edu

To visit the Parents PACK web section, go to:
http://vaccine.chop.edu/parents

VEC has just developed a new tear sheet for parents titled "Novel H1N1: What you should know." To access this new resource, go to:
http://www.chop.edu/export/download/pdfs/articles/vaccine-education-center/h1n1-tearpad.pdf

To visit the section with educational materials for healthcare professionals, which features tear sheets on many vaccines and immunization safety issues, videos, booklets, and more, go to: http://www.chop.edu/service/vaccine-education-center/order-educational-materials Click on the link titled "educational materials for healthcare professionals."

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16.  Attend October ACIP meeting via webcast

The October 21-22 ACIP meeting will be accessible via a webcast on the Internet. No registration is required. Instructions for logging on are available on the ACIP website at http://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/recs/acip

The registration deadline for attending the meeting in person is past.

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17.  Save the date: 13th annual Conference on Vaccine Research scheduled for April 26-28, 2010

The National Foundation for Infectious Diseases is sponsoring the Thirteenth Annual Conference on Vaccine Research, April 26-28, 2010,in Bethesda, Maryland. The conference is the largest scientific forum devoted exclusively to the research and development of all vaccines and related technologies for prevention and treatment of disease through immunization.

Additional information can be accessed at http://www.nfid.org/conferences/vaccine10

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Immunization Action Coalition  •  Saint Paul, MN
tel 651-647-9009  •  fax 651-647-9131
 
This website is supported in part by a cooperative agreement from the National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases (Grant No. 5U38IP000290) at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in Atlanta, GA. The website content is the sole responsibility of IAC and does not necessarily represent the official views of CDC.