Home
|
About IAC
|
Contact
|
A-Z Index
|
Donate
|
Shop
|
SUBSCRIBE
Immunization Action Coalition
IAC Express 2009
Issue number 822: September 8, 2009
Please click here to subscribe to IAC Express as well as other FREE IAC periodicals.
Contents of this Issue
Select a title to jump to the article.
  1. MMWR reports on surveillance for pediatric deaths associated with H1N1 influenza virus infection
  2. CDC updates its H1N1 Flu web section with guidelines and a toolkit for child care and early childhood programs
  3. ACIP issues provisional recommendations for evidence of measles, mumps, and rubella immunity for healthcare workers
  4. ACIP issues provisional recommendations for the use of combination vaccines
  5. IAC updates its Summary of Recommendations for Adult Immunization, as well as eight print pieces about influenza; revised influenza screening questionnaires can be used for H1N1 influenza vaccination too!
  6. It's not too early to start vaccinating people against seasonal influenza
  7. Vote for the best influenza prevention PSA by going to IAC's Video of the Week section!
  8. IAC's padded screening questionnaires for contraindications now have English on front, Spanish on the back--a popular translation at no added cost!
  9. "CDC Features" includes information for patients about shingles
  10. CDC publishes guidelines for prevention and treatment of opportunistic infections among HIV-exposed and HIV-infected children previously published as MMWR Early Release
  11. CDC's September 17 net conference to focus on seasonal and H1N1 influenza
  12. Healthy Roads Media offers VISs and other immunization resources in new formats
  13. Childhood Influenza Immunization Coalition offers tool to help facilitate discussion about influenza vaccination
  14. Reminder: AAP's "Sound Advice" audio interviews are available to help answer parents' questions about vaccination
  15. MMWR reports on worldwide laboratory surveillance for wild and vaccine-derived polioviruses
 
Abbreviations
AAFP, American Academy of Family Physicians; AAP, American Academy of Pediatrics; ACIP, Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices; AMA, American Medical Association; CDC, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention; FDA, Food and Drug Administration; IAC, Immunization Action Coalition; MMWR, Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report; NCIRD, National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases; NIVS, National Influenza Vaccine Summit; VIS, Vaccine Information Statement; VPD, vaccine-preventable disease; WHO, World Health Organization.
  
Issue 822: September 8, 2009
1.  MMWR reports on surveillance for pediatric deaths associated with H1N1 influenza virus infection

CDC published "Surveillance for Pediatric Deaths Associated with 2009 Pandemic Influenza A (H1N1) Virus Infection--United States, April-August 2009," in the September 4 issue of MMWR. A summary made available to the press is reprinted below in its entirety.


As of August 8, 2009, 477 deaths have been associated with 2009 pandemic influenza A (H1N1) virus infection in the United States, including 36 children younger than 18 years. Based on studies from previous influenza outbreaks, children aged younger than 5 years or with certain chronic medical conditions are at increased risk for complications and death from influenza. Sixty-seven percent of children who died had at least one chronic high-risk medical condition. Neurodevelopmental conditions, such as developmental delay, epilepsy, and cerebral palsy, were the most frequently noted chronic medical conditions, reported in over 90 percent of children with a chronic medical condition. A number of children also had bacterial infections, including most children who were older than 5 years and did not have high-risk medical conditions. This finding suggests that bacteria, in combination with H1N1 influenza, can cause severe disease in children who may be otherwise healthy.


To access the full article in web-text (HTML) format, go to:
http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/mm5834a1.htm

To access a ready-to-print (PDF) version of this issue of MMWR, go to:
http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/PDF/wk/mm5834.pdf

To receive a FREE electronic subscription to MMWR (which includes new ACIP recommendations), go to:
http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/mmwrsubscribe.html

Back to top
   
2 CDC updates its H1N1 Flu web section with guidelines and a toolkit for child care and early childhood programs

On September 4, CDC posted new information to the Guidance sub-section of its H1N1 Flu web section. "CDC Guidance on Helping Child Care and Early Childhood Programs Respond to Influenza during the 2009-2010 Influenza Season," is available at
http://www.cdc.gov/h1n1flu/childcare/guidance.htm

In addition to the guidance itself, CDC has developed a toolkit to provide information and communication resources to help center-based and home-based child care programs, Head Start programs, and other early childhood programs implement the recommendations from the guidance document. To access the toolkit, go to:
http://www.cdc.gov/h1n1flu/childcare/toolkit

The home page of CDC's H1N1 Flu web section can be accessed from http://www.cdc.gov/h1n1flu

IAC has gathered important information related to H1N1 influenza in a new web section to make it easier to keep up to date with developments. To access this resource, go to:
http://www.immunize.org/h1n1

Back to top
   
3 ACIP issues provisional recommendations for evidence of measles, mumps, and rubella immunity for healthcare workers

On August 28, CDC posted "ACIP Provisional Recommendations for Measles-Mumps-Rubella (MMR) 'Evidence of Immunity' Requirements for Healthcare Personnel" on its website. The recommendations spell out what ACIP considers adequate presumptive evidence of immunity to measles, rubella, and mumps for persons who work in healthcare facilities.

To access these provisional recommendations in ready-to-print (PDF) format, go to:
http://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/recs/provisional/downloads/mmr-evidence-immunity-Aug2009-508.pdf

To access all provisional ACIP recommendations, go to:
http://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/recs/provisional/default.htm

To access all finalized ACIP recommendations, go to: http://www.immunize.org/acip IAC's ACIP web section allows visitors to sort documents by date, vaccine, or topic. Bookmark this link for easy access to all provisional and final ACIP recommendations.

Back to top
   
4 ACIP issues provisional recommendations for the use of combination vaccines

On August 28, CDC posted "ACIP Provisional Recommendations for the Use of Combination Vaccines" on its website. In this document, ACIP states that the use of a combination vaccine generally is preferred over separate injections of its equivalent component vaccines. Considerations should include provider assessment, patient preference, and the potential for adverse events. Provider assessment should include the number of injections, vaccine availability, likelihood of improved coverage, likelihood of patient return, and storage and cost consideration.

To access the full provisional recommendations in ready-to-print (PDF) format, go to:
http://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/recs/provisional/downloads/combo-vax-Aug2009-508.pdf

To access all provisional ACIP recommendations, go to:
http://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/recs/provisional/default.htm

To access all finalized ACIP recommendations, go to: http://www.immunize.org/acip IAC's ACIP web section allows visitors to sort documents by date, vaccine, or topic. Bookmark this link for easy access to all provisional and final ACIP recommendations.

Back to top
   
5 IAC updates its Summary of Recommendations for Adult Immunization, as well as eight print pieces about influenza; revised influenza screening questionnaires can be used for H1N1 influenza vaccination too!

IAC has updated nine resources for healthcare providers, including many related to seasonal influenza vaccine administration and its ever-popular "Summary of Recommendations for Adult Immunization."

"Summary of Recommendations for Adult Immunization" was revised to include information about PPSV vaccine for patients with asthma or who smoke, hepatitis A vaccine for families of children adopted from certain countries, indications for a second dose of MCV vaccine, as well as minor edits. To access the revised "Summary of Recommendations for Adult Immunization," go to:
http://www.immunize.org/catg.d/p2011.pdf

In IAC's "Screening Questionnaire for Injectable Influenza Vaccination," all references to "TIV" (trivalent influenza vaccine) were changed to "inactivated injectable influenza vaccine." This piece can now be used for screening for both seasonal and H1N1 vaccination. To access the revised "Screening Questionnaire for Injectable Influenza Vaccination," go to:
http://www.immunize.org/catg.d/p4066.pdf

IAC's "Screening Questionnaire for Intranasal Influenza Vaccination" was revised to include information about use of seasonal influenza and H1N1 influenza live vaccines on the second page (i.e., the two live influenza vaccines should not be given together; if only live influenza vaccines are available, they should be separated by 4 weeks). This piece can now be used for screening for both seasonal and H1N1 vaccination. To access the revised "Screening Questionnaire for Intranasal Influenza Vaccination," go to:
http://www.immunize.org/catg.d/p4067.pdf

"Don't take chances with your family's health--make sure you all get vaccinated against influenza every year!" a one-page piece to encourage families to be vaccinated against influenza, was reviewed for 2009 and only the date was changed. The piece explains how easy it is to become infected with and transmit influenza, and outlines the range of health consequences the disease can have on the individual and family. The intention is to influence at least one person in each family to see to it that all eligible family members--children, parents, and grandparents--get vaccinated every year.To obtain a copy, go to:
http://www.immunize.org/catg.d/p4069.pdf

The title of "Give these people influenza vaccine!" was changed to "Give these people seasonal influenza vaccine!" Other minor edits make it clear the piece relates to seasonal, not H1N1, influenza. To access the revised "Give these people seasonal influenza vaccine!" go to:
http://www.immunize.org/catg.d/p2013.pdf

"First do no harm: Protect patients by making sure all staff receive yearly influenza vaccine!" was updated with some new resources about influenza. To access the revised "First do no harm: Protect patients by making sure all staff receive yearly influenza vaccine!" go to:
http://www.immunize.org/catg.d/p2014.pdf

The title of "Standing Orders for Administering Influenza Vaccine to Adults" was changed to "Standing Orders for Administering Seasonal Influenza Vaccine to Adults." Other edits were made to include changes from the 2009-10 ACIP recommendations for use of seasonal influenza vaccine. To access the revised "Standing Orders for Administering Influenza Vaccine to Adults," go to:
http://www.immunize.org/catg.d/p3074.pdf

The title of "Standing Orders for Administering Influenza Vaccines to Children and Adolescents" was changed to "Standing Orders for Administering Seasonal Influenza Vaccines to Children & Adolescents." Other edits were made to include changes from the 2009-10 ACIP recommendations for use of seasonal influenza vaccine. To access the revised "Standing Orders for Administering Influenza Vaccine to Children and Adolescents," go to:
http://www.immunize.org/catg.d/p3074a.pdf

"Declination of Influenza Vaccination" received minor revisions. To access the revised "Declination of Influenza Vaccination," go to:
http://www.immunize.org/catg.d/p4068.pdf

IAC's Print Materials web section offers healthcare professionals and the public approximately 250 FREE English-language materials (many also available in translation), which we encourage website users to print out, copy, and distribute widely. To access all of IAC's free print materials, go to:
http://www.immunize.org/printmaterials

Back to top
   
6 It's not too early to start vaccinating people against seasonal influenza

Many healthcare professionals have been asking if it's too soon to start vaccinating patients against seasonal influenza. The answer is no--CDC advises to begin administering seasonal influenza vaccine as soon as vaccine becomes available.

Vaccinating now with seasonal influenza vaccine will allow more time for healthcare providers to focus on later immunization efforts when vaccine for 2009 H1N1 influenza A virus becomes available. You will be vaccinating against both seasonal influenza and 2009 H1N1 throughout the fall and winter, so it's best to get a head start on your efforts beginning now.

In addition, early vaccination of children younger than age 9 years who are first-time vaccinees (or who failed to get their second dose in the preceding season) can be helpful in assuring routine second doses before the influenza season begins.

Finally, it's always a good rule of thumb to take advantage of an opportunity to vaccinate instead of relying on patients to come back for another appointment.

Many resources regarding influenza disease and vaccination are available to healthcare professionals and the public. Following is a list of some of them.

To access the National Influenza Vaccine Summit website, go to:
http://www.preventinfluenza.org

To access IAC's Seasonal Influenza web section, go to:
http://www.immunize.org/influenza

To access IAC's H1N1 Influenza web section, go to:
http://www.immunize.org/h1n1

To access CDC's Seasonal Flu web section, go to:
http://www.cdc.gov/flu

To access CDC's Novel H1N1 Flu web section, go to:
http://www.cdc.gov/h1n1flu

To access IAC's print pieces related to influenza, including screening questionnaires, patient education pieces, and sample standing orders, go to:
http://www.immunize.org/printmaterials/dis_inf.asp

Back to top
   
7 Vote for the best influenza prevention PSA by going to IAC's Video of the Week section!

This week, IAC's Video of the Week page directs viewers to the HHS Flu Prevention Public Service Announcement (PSA) Contest. The judges have narrowed 240 entries down to 10 and it's time to vote!

Getting an influenza prevention message out to as many people as possible this year is critical. Help HHS determine which of these 10 PSAs will have the greatest impact on the populations most vulnerable to influenza. Voting runs through September 16. For more information on the contest, go to:
http://www.flu.gov/psa/psacontest1.html

The link to the videos will be available on the home page of IAC's website through September 13. To access it, go to: http://www.immunize.org and click on the image under the words Video of the Week.

Remember to bookmark IAC's home page to view a new video every Monday. To view an IAC Video of the Week from the past, go to the video archive at http://www.immunize.org/votw

Back to top
   
8 IAC's padded screening questionnaires for contraindications now have English on front, Spanish on the back--a popular translation at no added cost!

In response to demand, IAC now has a Spanish-language translation of the questions on its padded Screening Questionnaire for Child and Teen Immunization and Screening Questionnaire for Adult Immunization. Printed on the back of the English page, the Spanish page has been added to this product at no additional cost.

The questionnaires give you and your patients a quick, easy, and thorough way to determine if they have contraindications and precautions to vaccination. Patients fill out the questionnaire with yes-or-no answers while waiting to be seen, allowing you to review their responses quickly and be confident you're not missing any contraindications or precautions.

The questionnaires come in convenient tear-off pads of 100 sheets. The price per pad is economical (discounts for two pads or more), so you'll be able to keep pads at the receptionist's desk, the nurse's station, and in every exam room. Each pad comes with four English-language reference sheets (printed on heavy-weight paper) for health professionals.

Prices start at $16 each for one pad and drop to $12 each for two, $11 each for three, and $10 each for four. For quotes on larger quantities or customizing, call (651) 647-9009 or email admininfo@immunize.org

To learn more about the padded screening questionnaires, or to order online or download an order form, visit

Screening Questionnaire for Child and Teen Immunization
http://www.immunize.org/shop/pad_sqchild.asp

Screening Questionnaire for Adult Immunization
http://www.immunize.org/shop/pad_sqadult.asp

IAC's offers other products for sale, including educational videos and personal immunization record cards, at
http://www.immunize.org/shop

Back to top
   
9 "CDC Features" includes information for patients about shingles

The "CDC Features" web section includes a new article about shingles disease and zoster vaccine targeted toward patients.

To access "Protect Yourself against Shingles: Get Vaccinated," go to:
http://www.cdc.gov/features/shingles

To access an alphabetical index of all "CDC Features," go to:
http://www.cdc.gov/features

Back to top
   
10.  CDC publishes guidelines for prevention and treatment of opportunistic infections among HIV-exposed and HIV-infected children previously published as MMWR Early Release

CDC published "Guidelines for the Prevention and Treatment of Opportunistic Infections Among HIV-Exposed and HIV-Infected Children" on August 26 as an MMWR Early Release. On September 4, these guidelines were published as an MMWR Recommendations and Reports.

The guidelines include updated immunization recommendations for HIV-exposed and HIV-infected children, including hepatitis A, human papillomavirus, meningococcal, and rotavirus vaccines.

To access the guidelines in web-text (HTML) format, go to:
http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/rr5811a1.htm

To access a ready-to-print (PDF) version of these guidelines, go to:
http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/PDF/rr/rr5811.pdf

Back to top
   
11.  CDC's September 17 net conference to focus on seasonal and H1N1 influenza

CDC's next "Current Issues in Immunization" net conference will be held on September 17 from noon to 1PM ET. CDC's Anthony Fiore, MD, MPH, will provide an update on novel H1N1 influenza, and Iyabode Akinsanya-Beysolow, MD, MPH, will discuss 2009-10 seasonal influenza recommendations.

Registration is limited and will close on September 15 or when the course is full. To register, go to:
http://www2.cdc.gov/vaccines/ed/ciinc

Back to top
   
12.  Healthy Roads Media offers VISs and other immunization resources in new formats

Healthy Roads Media has long offered health education materials in a number of languages and a variety of formats, including VISs in enhanced formats (audio, multimedia, web-video, and mobile video).

In response to requests, Healthy Roads Media recently added two more ways to present immunization educational material. The newly available MPEG format is useful in settings that have video-on-demand or closed circuit television systems that provide patient education. The second new option is DVD versions of the materials; each DVD includes English and a second language.

To cover the costs of producing and disseminating these materials, the organization is charging a minimal fee. Free web-based print materials can be downloaded to go along with the MPEG and DVD versions.

For more information about immunization materials available in MPEG format, go to:
http://www.healthyroadsmedia.org/videos/agree.htm

For more information about immunization materials available in DVD format, go to:
http://www.healthyroadsmedia.org/dvd.htm

To access other resources from Healthy Roads Media, go to:
http://www.healthyroadsmedia.org/topics/immunization.htm

Back to top
   
13.  Childhood Influenza Immunization Coalition offers tool to help facilitate discussion about influenza vaccination

With an unusual influenza season fast approaching, the Childhood Influenza Immunization Coalition (CIIC) has developed a helpful tool, a poster titled the Health Care Professionals' Influenza Vaccination Commitment. This document is designed to be displayed in medical practices and other healthcare facilities, as well as on websites, to facilitate discussion about influenza vaccination.

One version of the poster is targeted toward places where vaccination is offered. A second version is designed for display where vaccination is not offered, but strongly encouraged. Both versions let patients know that their healthcare professional recommends annual vaccination against seasonal influenza.

To access either of these posters, go to:
http://www.preventchildhoodinfluenza.org/healthcare/practice_resources_influenza_flu_resources.php

For more resources for preventing childhood influenza, visit CIIC's home page at
http://www.preventchildhoodinfluenza.org

Back to top
   
14.  Reminder: AAP's "Sound Advice" audio interviews are available to help answer parents' questions about vaccination

The American Academy of Pediatrics' (AAP) "Sound Advice" series of audio interviews with pediatricians, researchers, advocates, and others might be helpful when working with vaccine-hesitant parents.

To access this series, which includes interviews with former First Lady Rosalynn Carter, Dr. Paul Offit, and Dr. Ari Brown, go to:
http://www.cispimmunize.org/fam/soundadvice.html

Back to top
   
15.  MMWR reports on worldwide laboratory surveillance for wild and vaccine-derived polioviruses

CDC published "Laboratory Surveillance for Wild and Vaccine-Derived Polioviruses--Worldwide, January 2008-June 2009," in the September 4 issue of MMWR. A summary made available to the press is reprinted below in its entirety.


The Global Polio Laboratory Network is comprised of 144 laboratories in 97 countries coordinated by the World Health Organization. Data from the network are used to guide the Global Polio Eradication Initiative by confirming polio cases, detecting and determining the origin of importations, identifying vaccine-derived polioviruses, and documenting the circulation of wild polioviruses. The network tested 247,794 fecal samples sent to the laboratories from investigations of acute flaccid paralysis cases, from which 14,279 polioviruses and 46,462 nonpolio enterovirus isolates were detected during January 2008-June 2009. Despite this increasing workload, the laboratory network has improved the efficiency of poliovirus testing and reduced reporting times by 50 percent since 2007. These virus testing improvements enable more rapid implementation of responsive supplementary immunization activities targeted at areas of confirmed wild poliovirus circulation.


To access the full article in web-text (HTML) format, go to:
http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/mm5834a3.htm

To access a ready-to-print (PDF) version of this issue of MMWR, go to:
http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/PDF/wk/mm5834.pdf

Back to top
   
Immunization Action Coalition  •  2550 University Avenue West  •  Suite 415 North  •  Saint Paul, Minnesota  •  55114
tel 651-647-9009  •  fax 651-647-9131
 
This website is supported in part by a cooperative agreement from the National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases (Grant No. 5U38IP000290) at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in Atlanta, GA. The website content is the sole responsibility of IAC and does not necessarily represent the official views of CDC.