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Immunization Action Coalition
IAC Express 2009
Issue number 820: August 31, 2009
Please click here to subscribe to IAC Express as well as other FREE IAC periodicals.
Contents of this Issue
Select a title to jump to the article.
  1. MMWR reports on vaccination coverage of children ages 19-35 months
  2. CDC publishes H1N1 influenza recommendations previously published as an MMWR Early Release
  3. IAC's Video of the Week features Dr. Anne Schuchat answering parents' questions about H1N1 influenza
  4. MMWR publishes article about H1N1 influenza infections in Chicago
  5. MMWR reports on surveillance for H1N1 influenza in New Zealand
  6. CDC launches a new vaccination campaign targeted toward parents and caregivers of Native American pre-teens
  7. California VFC Program releases free resources related to vaccine storage and handling
  8. CDC's guidelines for prevention and treatment of opportunistic infections among HIV-exposed and HIV-infected children include information about vaccination
  9. Order IAC's laminated U.S. immunization schedules today!
  10. Two campaigns offer resources for preventing pertussis
  11. It's not too early to start vaccinating people against seasonal influenza
  12. Important: During H1N1 influenza outbreak, administer PPSV to all people with existing indications
  13. CDC offers the public a way to share opinions about H1N1 influenza vaccination online
  14. August issue of CDC's Immunization Works electronic newsletter recently released
  15. WHO issues position paper on measles vaccines
  16. Consortium for Infant and Child Health at Eastern Virginia Medical School offers customizable poster
  17. ACIP meeting scheduled for October 21-22 in Atlanta; registration deadlines are in early October
  18. Consortium for Healthy and Immunized Communities will present its annual symposium September 25 in Cleveland
 
Abbreviations
AAFP, American Academy of Family Physicians; AAP, American Academy of Pediatrics; ACIP, Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices; AMA, American Medical Association; CDC, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention; FDA, Food and Drug Administration; IAC, Immunization Action Coalition; MMWR, Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report; NCIRD, National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases; NIVS, National Influenza Vaccine Summit; VIS, Vaccine Information Statement; VPD, vaccine-preventable disease; WHO, World Health Organization.
  
Issue 820: August 31, 2009
1.  MMWR reports on vaccination coverage of children ages 19-35 months

CDC published "National, State, and Local Area Vaccination Coverage Among Children Aged 19-35 Months--United States, 2008" in the August 28 issue of MMWR. The first paragraph is reprinted below, excluding references.


The National Immunization Survey (NIS) estimates vaccination coverage among children aged 19-35 months for 50 states and selected local areas. Healthy People 2010 established vaccination coverage targets of 90% for individual vaccines in the 4:3:1:3:3:1 vaccine series and 80% for the series. This report describes the 2008 NIS coverage estimates for this series and individual vaccines, 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV7), =>2 doses of hepatitis A vaccine (HepA), and hepatitis B vaccination received in the first 3  days of life (HepB birth dose) among children born during January 2005-June 2007. In 2008, 4:3:1:3:3:1 series coverage was 76.1%, compared with 77.4% in 2007; =>90% coverage was maintained for all recommended series vaccines, except =>4 doses of diphtheria, tetanus, and acellular pertussis (DTaP) vaccine. Coverage with =>3 doses of Haemophilus influenzae type b vaccine (Hib) decreased from 2007, likely because of the shortage of Hib vaccine and the recommendation to defer the routine Hib vaccine booster dose administered at age 12-15 months. Substantial variability was observed in individual and series vaccination coverage among states/local areas. Among racial/ethnic groups, coverage varied little and, after adjusting for poverty, coverage estimates were not significantly lower for any groups compared with whites. However, children living below poverty had lower coverage than children living at or above poverty for most vaccines. Sustaining high coverage levels and using effective methods of reducing disparities across states/local areas and income groups remains a priority to fully protect children and limit the incidence of vaccine-preventable diseases. . . .


To access the full article in web-text (HTML) format, go to:
http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/mm5833a3.htm

To access a ready-to-print (PDF) version of this issue of MMWR, go to:
http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/PDF/wk/mm5833.pdf

To receive a FREE electronic subscription to MMWR (which includes new ACIP recommendations), go to:
http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/mmwrsubscribe.html

To read a related press release from CDC, go to:
http://www.cdc.gov/media/pressrel/2009/r090827.htm

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2 CDC publishes H1N1 influenza recommendations previously published as an MMWR Early Release

On August 28, CDC published "Use of Influenza A (H1N1) 2009 Monovalent Vaccine: Recommendations of the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP), 2009" as an MMWR Recommendations and Reports. This document was previously released as an MMWR Early Release on August 21, and was previously covered in IAC Express on August 24.

To access the full article in web-text (HTML) format, go to:
http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/rr5810a1.htm

To access a ready-to-print (PDF) version of these recommendations, go to:
http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/PDF/rr/rr5810.pdf

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3 IAC's Video of the Week features Dr. Anne Schuchat answering parents' questions about H1N1 influenza

IAC encourages IAC Express readers to watch a 10-minute video on H1N1 influenza featuring CDC's Director of the National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases, Dr. Anne Schuchat. In this video, Dr. Schuchat answers parents' questions about the 2009 H1N1 influenza and the vaccine to protect against it.

The video will be available on the home page of IAC's website through September 7. To access it, go to: http://www.immunize.org and click on the image under the words Video of the Week. It may take a few moments for the video to begin playing; please be patient!

Remember to bookmark IAC's home page to view a new video every Monday. To view an IAC Video of the Week from the past, go to the video archive at http://www.immunize.org/votw/jul09.asp

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4 MMWR publishes article about H1N1 influenza infections in Chicago

CDC published "2009 Pandemic Influenza A (H1N1) Virus Infections--Chicago, Illinois, April-July 2009" in the August 28 issue of MMWR. A summary made available to the press is reprinted below in its entirety.


In a CDC report published today, the Chicago Department of Public Health is reporting a summary of the 1,557 novel influenza A (H1N1) cases that occurred among city residents during April through July. They found that the rates of novel H1N1 infection were highest among children and young adults, particularly children 5 to 14 years old who had 14 times higher rates than adults older than 60 years. These findings suggest that disease prevention efforts should focus on children and young adults, who are at a disproportionate risk for infection and hospitalization. In accordance with recent recommendations from the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP), this population should be among the first groups targeted for vaccination with influenza A (H1N1) 2009 monovalent vaccine (when available).


To access the full article in web-text (HTML) format, go to:
http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/mm5833a1.htm

To access a ready-to-print (PDF) version of this issue of MMWR, go to:
http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/PDF/wk/mm5833.pdf

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5 MMWR reports on surveillance for H1N1 influenza in New Zealand

CDC published "Surveillance for the 2009 Pandemic Influenza A (H1N1) Virus and Seasonal Influenza Viruses--New Zealand, 2009" in the August 28 issue of MMWR. The first paragraph of the article is reprinted below, excluding references.


The 2009 pandemic influenza A (H1N1) virus, which was first identified in the United States and Mexico, was imported into New Zealand by a high school group returning from Mexico in late April 2009. By June, sustained community transmission of the virus had been established in New Zealand. To track the incidence of influenza-like illness (ILI) and compare the number of viruses identified as 2009 pandemic influenza A (H1N1) with the number identified as seasonal influenza, New Zealand public health officials analyzed weekly data from the country's sentinel general practitioner (GP) surveillance system and nonsentinel laboratory surveillance network for the period extending from the week ending May 3 through the week ending August 2. This report describes the results of those analyses, which determined that the number of viruses identified as 2009 pandemic influenza A (H1N1) rapidly overtook the number identified as seasonal influenza, and the peak weekly consultation rate for ILI was three times the peak rate in New Zealand during the same period in 2008. These findings demonstrate the value of using integrated epidemiologic and virologic surveillance in New Zealand to monitor the scope of an influenza epidemic, identify circulating strains, assist public health control measures, and guide effective use of influenza vaccines and antivirals. . . .


To access the full article in web-text (HTML) format, go to:
http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/mm5833a2.htm

To access a ready-to-print (PDF) version of this issue of MMWR, go to:
http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/PDF/wk/mm5833.pdf

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6 CDC launches a new vaccination campaign targeted toward parents and caregivers of Native American pre-teens

CDC recently launched a new vaccination campaign targeted toward parents and caregivers of Native American pre-teens. Campaign materials, including flyers, posters, and web buttons, are available for both Northwest and Southwest regions. The campaign aims to educate parents about the recommended check-up for adolescents ages 11-12 years, and encourage them to make an appointment for their pre-teen.

Campaign materials can be downloaded at
http://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/spec-grps/preteens-adol/07gallery/aian/posters.htm

Be sure to check out the entire pre-teen vaccine campaign web section, which includes materials targeted toward African American, Caucasian, and Hispanic populations. Educational materials for Asian American parents in Vietnamese and Korean will be ready for downloading and ordering in the coming weeks. To access these resources, go to:
http://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/spec-grps/preteens-adol/07gallery/default.htm

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7 California VFC Program releases free resources related to vaccine storage and handling

The California Vaccines for Children (VFC) Program has developed printable aids to help protect your vaccine supply. Resources include flyers about refrigerator and freezer setup, safeguarding your power supply, responsibilities of the vaccine coordinator, and more.

To access these free aids, go to:
http://www.eziz.org/resources/materials_storageandhand.html

Visit the home page of the website at http://www.eziz.org to discover many more valuable resources.

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8 CDC's guidelines for prevention and treatment of opportunistic infections among HIV-exposed and HIV-infected children include information about vaccination

CDC published "Guidelines for the Prevention and Treatment of Opportunistic Infections Among HIV-Exposed and HIV-Infected Children" on August 26 as an MMWR Early Release. The guidelines include updated immunization recommendations for HIV-exposed and HIV-infected children, including hepatitis A, human papillomavirus, meningococcal, and rotavirus vaccines.

To access the full article in web-text (HTML) format, go to:
http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/rr58e0826a1.htm

To access a ready-to-print (PDF) version of this MMWR Early Release, go to:
http://www.cdc.gov/MMWR/pdf/rr/rr58e0826.pdf

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9 Order IAC's laminated U.S. immunization schedules today!

IAC has two laminated immunization schedules for 2009--one for children/teens ages 0 through 18 years and one for adults. Based on CDC's 2009 immunization schedules, the laminated schedules offer two significant advantages over paper schedules:

(1) They are covered with a tough, washable coating that lets them stand up to a year's worth of use as guides to immunization and as teaching tools you can use to give patients and parents authoritative immunization information.

(2) Each schedule includes a guide to vaccine contraindications and precautions, a feature that will help you to make on-the-spot determinations about vaccinating patients of any age.

IAC's laminated schedules come complete with essential footnotes and are printed in color for easy reading. Each schedule has six pages (i.e., three double-sided pages), and when folded, measures 8.5" x 11".

An image of each schedule is available, as is specific information about each, and a downloadable order form and online ordering information.

To access an image of the child/teen schedule and related information, go to:
http://www.immunize.org/shop/schedule_child.asp

To access an image of the adult schedule and related information, go to:
http://www.immunize.org/shop/schedule_adult.asp

Prices start at $10 each for 1-4 copies and drop to $6.50 each for 5-19 copies. Discount pricing is available for 20 or more copies. For quotes on customizing or placing orders in excess of 999 schedules, call (651) 647-9009 or email admininfo@immunize.org

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10.  Two campaigns offer resources for preventing pertussis

The American Academy of Family Physicians recently developed an initiative designed to reinforce the role that family physicians play in keeping an entire family protected from pertussis. "Vaccination Matters: Help Protect Families from Whooping Cough" includes presentations, fact sheets, and more.

To access the initiative's resources online, go to:
http://www.aafp.org/online/en/home/clinical/immunizationres/pertussis.html

The Sounds of Pertussis campaign is a joint initiative of the March of Dimes and sanofi pasteur. Its primary spokespeople are actress, singer, and mother, Jennifer Lopez, and Alan R. Fleischman, MD, medical director of the March of Dimes. The campaign seeks to educate parents that they need to be vaccinated with Tdap vaccine in order to protect their vulnerable infants against pertussis.

Visit the campaign's website at http://www.soundsofpertussis.com and recommend it to expectant and new parents. The website includes videos and postcards that can be emailed, as well as a flyer, brochure, and wallet card.

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11.  It's not too early to start vaccinating people against seasonal influenza

Many healthcare professionals have been asking if it's too soon to start vaccinating patients against seasonal influenza. The answer is no--CDC advises to begin administering seasonal influenza vaccine as soon as vaccine becomes available.

Vaccinating now with seasonal influenza vaccine will allow more time for healthcare providers to focus on later immunization efforts when vaccine for 2009 H1N1 influenza A virus becomes available. You will be vaccinating against both seasonal influenza and 2009 H1N1 throughout the fall and winter, so it's best to get a head start on your efforts beginning now.

In addition, early vaccination of children younger than age 9 years who are first time vaccinees (or who failed to get their second dose in the preceding season) can be helpful in assuring routine second doses before the influenza season begins.

Finally, it's always a good rule of thumb to take advantage of an opportunity to vaccinate instead of relying on patients to come back for another appointment.

Many resources regarding influenza disease and vaccination are available to healthcare professionals and the public. Following is a list of some of them.

To access the National Influenza Vaccine Summit website, go to:
http://www.preventinfluenza.org

To access IAC's Seasonal Influenza web section, go to:
http://www.immunize.org/influenza

To access IAC's H1N1 Influenza web section, go to:
http://www.immunize.org/h1n1

To access CDC's Seasonal Flu web section, go to:
http://www.cdc.gov/flu

To access CDC's Novel H1N1 Flu web section, go to:
http://www.cdc.gov/h1n1flu

To access IAC's print pieces related to influenza, including screening questionnaires, patient education pieces, and  sample standing orders, go to:
http://www.immunize.org/printmaterials/dis_inf.asp

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12.  Important: During H1N1 influenza outbreak, administer PPSV to all people with existing indications

CDC advises healthcare professionals that during the current outbreak of novel influenza A (H1N1), all people who have existing indications for PPSV should be vaccinated according to current ACIP recommendations. This is important because people with existing indications are not only at increased risk for pneumococcal disease, but are also at increased risk for serious complications from influenza. Use of PPSV among people without current indications for vaccination is not recommended at this time.

To access CDC's comprehensive document "Interim guidance for use of 23-valent pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine during novel influenza A (H1N1) outbreak," go to:
http://www.cdc.gov/h1n1flu/guidance/ppsv_h1n1.htm

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13.  CDC offers the public a way to share opinions about H1N1 influenza vaccination online

CDC has announced a new way for the public to engage in dialogue about approaches to take regarding a voluntary vaccination program for H1N1 pandemic influenza. Interested members of the general public can provide input online on Monday and Tuesday, August 31 and September 1, 2009. Registrants are expected to participate on both days of the two-day dialogue, and must be willing to complete a pre- and post-knowledge survey, respond to a poll on the second day, and provide feedback through an evaluation at the conclusion of the dialogue.

To register, go to: http://www.WebDialogues.net/H1N1

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14.  August issue of CDC's Immunization Works electronic newsletter recently released

CDC recently released the August issue of its monthly newsletter Immunization Works and posted it on the website of the National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases (NCIRD). The newsletter offers the immunization community information about current topics. The information is in the public domain and can be reproduced and circulated widely.

Most of the information in the August issue has already appeared in previous issues of IAC Express. Following is the text of some articles we have not covered.


MEETINGS, CONFERENCES & RESOURCES

NEW VFC FLYERS FOR PARENTS, PROVIDERS: CDC has published two new flyers to educate healthcare providers and parents about the Vaccines for Children (VFC) Program. They are Vaccines for Children: Information for Healthcare Providers from CDC (http://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/programs/vfc/downloads/flyer-vfc-hcp-508.pdf) and Vaccines for Children: Information for Parents from CDC (http://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/programs/vfc/downloads/flyer-vfc-parents-508.pdf). Both flyers can be easily downloaded and printed in color or black and white.

IMMUNIZATION UPDATE 2009: Slide sets are now available from the July 30, 2009 Live Satellite Broadcast and Webcast, Immunization Update. This 2.5-hour program focuses on the most recent developments in the rapidly changing field of immunization, including new vaccine recommendations. For more information, visit CDC's Immunization Education and Training Webcasts website (http://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/ed/webcasts.htm).

NATIONAL INFANT IMMUNIZATION WEEK: An early reminder: National Infant Immunization Week will be held April 24-May 1, 2010.


RESPIRATORY NEWS AND RESOURCES

MENINGITIS VIDEO: CDC is now featuring a new video (http://www.cdc.gov/cdctv/haveyouheard) to educate parents about meningitis. The video uses a real-life mother and daughter team to showcase the all-too-real experience of when meningococcal illness frightens a community. Using a mix of humor and concrete advice from a CDC pediatric expert, this video will strike a chord with parents everywhere, encouraging pre-teen vaccination and a well-child visit for the often over-looked school-age child.

To access the complete August issue from the NCIRD website, go to:
http://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/news/newsltrs/imwrks/2009/200908.htm

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15.  WHO issues position paper on measles vaccines

The August 28 issue of the WHO periodical "Weekly Epidemiological Record" included the latest WHO position paper on measles vaccines. To access it, go to:
http://www.who.int/wer/2009/wer8435.pdf

A collection of WHO position papers on vaccines is available in alphabetical order at
http://www.who.int/immunization/documents/positionpapers

The position papers are available in chronological order on the IAC website at
http://www.immunize.org/who

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16.  Consortium for Infant and Child Health at Eastern Virginia Medical School offers customizable posterrticle 16.

The Consortium for Infant and Child Health at Eastern Virginia Medical School, along with Project Immunize Virginia, has developed a poster that includes a box that other organizations can customize. The poster promotes vaccination at age 4, with the tagline, "Make it less of a chore!"

For more information, email piv@evms.edu To download the poster, go to:
http://www.immunizeva.org/news/2009/05/27/vaccinate_at_age_4make_it_less_of_a_chore

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17.  ACIP meeting scheduled for October 21-22 in Atlanta; registration deadlines are in early October

The Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) will hold its next meeting on October 21-22 at CDC's Clifton Road campus in Atlanta. The meeting is open to the general public.

To attend the ACIP meeting at the Clifton Road campus, ACIP attendees (participants and visitors) must register online. October 2 is the online registration deadline for non-U.S. citizens. October 9 is the deadline for U.S. citizens.

To access the online registration form, go to:
http://www2a.cdc.gov/nip/ACIP/OctoberRegistration.asp

To access detailed information about the meeting, go to: http://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/recs/acip/meetings.htm#register There you will find links to the meeting agenda, driving directions, and other useful material.

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18.  Consortium for Healthy and Immunized Communities will present its annual symposium September 25 in Cleveland

The Consortium for Healthy and Immunized Communities and Boonshoft School of Medicine, Wright State University, will present their 8th annual immunization symposium, "Reflections of Change," on September 25 in Cleveland, OH.

Speakers include Dr. Lance Rodewald, CDC; Dr. Silviana Ng, Infectious Disease Associates; Dr. Ari Brown, author of Baby 411, Dr. Jane Seward, CDC; and Frankie Milley, founder and executive national director for Meningitis Angels.

For more information, go to:
http://www.chicohio.com/cureventpubl.html

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Immunization Action Coalition  •  Saint Paul, MN
tel 651-647-9009  •  fax 651-647-9131
 
This website is supported in part by a cooperative agreement from the National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases (Grant No. 5U38IP000290) at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in Atlanta, GA. The website content is the sole responsibility of IAC and does not necessarily represent the official views of CDC.