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Immunization Action Coalition
IAC Express 2009
Issue number 813: July 27, 2009
Please click here to subscribe to IAC Express as well as other FREE IAC periodicals.
Contents of this Issue
Select a title to jump to the article.
  1. CDC's 2009 recommendations for prevention and control of seasonal influenza published as an MMWR Early Release
  2. ACIP votes on recommendations for many vaccines at its June 24-26 meeting
  3. MMWR publishes report on neurological complications associated with H1N1 influenza in children in May 2009
  4. Four states expand immunization requirements; pharmacists authorized to vaccinate in all 50 states
  5. FDA approves seasonal influenza vaccines for 2009-10; package inserts for all vaccines are on IAC's website
  6. CDC summarizes H1N1 influenza situation and advises the healthcare community and public on ways to stay informed
  7. IAC's Video of the Week presents HHS Secretary Sebelius explaining the 2009 Flu Prevention PSA contest
  8. IAC's padded screening questionnaires for contraindications have English on front, Spanish on back--added value at no added cost!
  9. July issue of CDC's Immunization Works electronic newsletter recently released
  10. Clinical trials to test two candidate H1N1 influenza vaccines to begin soon
  11. CDC's H1N1 influenza web section updated with Q&As on H1N1 influenza vaccine development and more
  12. Engaging booklet helps the public evaluate science articles that appear in the media
  13. It's easy to give patients basic immunization information with CDC's attractive, formatted articles
  14. FREE online CE course on best practices in childhood and adolescent immunization now available
 
Abbreviations
AAFP, American Academy of Family Physicians; AAP, American Academy of Pediatrics; ACIP, Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices; AMA, American Medical Association; CDC, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention; FDA, Food and Drug Administration; IAC, Immunization Action Coalition; MMWR, Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report; NCIRD, National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases; NIVS, National Influenza Vaccine Summit; VIS, Vaccine Information Statement; VPD, vaccine-preventable disease; WHO, World Health Organization.
  
Issue 813: July 27, 2009
1.  CDC's 2009 recommendations for prevention and control of seasonal influenza published as an MMWR Early Release

On July 24, CDC published "Prevention and Control of Seasonal Influenza with Vaccines: Recommendations of the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP), 2009" as an electronic MMWR Early Release. The Summary is reprinted below. At the end of this IAC Express article, URLs will be given to two items that will be of particular interest to some readers: "BOX 1. Summary of seasonal influenza vaccination recommendations, 2009: children and adolescents aged 6 months-18 years" and "BOX 2. Summary of seasonal influenza vaccination recommendations, 2009: adults."


Summary
This report updates the 2008 recommendations by CDC's Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) regarding the use of influenza vaccine for the prevention and control of seasonal influenza. Information on vaccination issues related to the recently identified novel influenza A H1N1 virus will be published later in 2009. The 2009 seasonal influenza recommendations include new and updated information. Highlights of the 2009 recommendations include (1) a recommendation that annual vaccination be administered to all children aged 6 months-18 years for the 2009-10 influenza season; (2) a recommendation that vaccines containing the 2009-10 trivalent vaccine virus strains A/Brisbane/59/2007 (H1N1)-like, A/Brisbane/10/2007 (H3N2)-like, and B/Brisbane/60/2008-like antigens be used; and (3) a notice that recommendations for influenza diagnosis and antiviral use will be published before the start of the 2009-10 influenza season. Vaccination efforts should begin as soon as vaccine is available and continue through the influenza season. Approximately 83% of the United States population is specifically recommended for annual vaccination against seasonal influenza; however, <40% of the U.S. population received the 2008-09 influenza vaccine. These recommendations also include a summary of safety data for U.S. licensed influenza vaccines. These recommendations and other information are available at CDC's influenza website (http://www.cdc.gov/flu); any updates or supplements that might be required during the 2009-10 influenza season also can be found at this website. Vaccination and healthcare providers should be alert to announcements of recommendation updates and should check the CDC influenza website periodically for additional information. . . .


To access a ready-to-print (PDF) version of this MMWR Early Release, go to:
http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/pdf/rr/rr58e0724.pdf

To access a web-text (HTML) version of this MMWR Early Release, go to:
http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/rr58e0724a1.htm

To receive a FREE electronic subscription to MMWR (which includes new ACIP recommendations), go to:
http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/mmwrsubscribe.html

To access "BOX 1. Summary of seasonal influenza vaccination recommendations, 2009: children and adolescents aged 6 months-18 years," go to:
http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/rr58e0724a1.htm#box1

To access "BOX 2. Summary of seasonal influenza vaccination recommendations, 2009: adults," go to:
http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/rr58e0724a1.htm#box2

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2 ACIP votes on recommendations for many vaccines at its June 24-26 meeting

[The following is cross posted from the "Front Page News" section of CDC's Immunization Works electronic newsletter, July 2009.]

ACIP HIGHLIGHTS: The Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) met June 2426 in Atlanta, adding an extra half-day to their usual schedule to address the issue of influenza vaccination now that novel influenza A H1N1 is considered a pandemic influenza virus strain. The meeting produced several new and updated recommendations. These recommendations are provisional until they are reviewed by the director of CDC and published in the MMWR. Full minutes of the meeting, including slides from presentations, will be available soon on the ACIP Meetings web page (http://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/recs/acip/meetings.htm ).

General Recommendations: A clarification was made to the General Recommendations regarding combination vaccines, maintaining a general preference for combination vaccine products, but stating specific criteria by which a provider might choose the single-component products. Important considerations include provider assessment, patient preference, and potential for adverse events. Rabies Vaccine: The committee voted to reduce the number of rabies prevention from five to four. The schedule for administration of the doses is days 0, 3, 7, and 14. For more information, please see the Rabies Provisional Recommendation (http://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/recs/provisional/downloads/rabies-July2009-508.pdf).

Polio Vaccine: The minimum interval between dose 3 and dose 4 of polio-containing vaccines was changed from 4 weeks to 6 months.

Measles-Mumps-Rubella Vaccine: Modifications were made to the criteria for acceptable evidence of immunity to measles, mumps, and rubella for healthcare providers. Documentation of physician-diagnosed disease (previously considered evidence of measles and mumps immunity) is no longer an acceptable criterion. Birth before 1957 is still evidence of immunity, but facilities should consider vaccinating healthcare providers born before 1957 who have no other criterion for immunity with two doses of MMR vaccine. In an outbreak, two doses of vaccine are specifically recommended for healthcare providers born before 1957.

Meningococcal Vaccine: A recommendation was made for revaccination using meningococcal conjugate vaccine for persons who remain at high risk for meningococcal disease after their first vaccination (with either the polysaccharide or the conjugate meningococcal vaccine). These include persons with persistent complement component deficiencies, persons with anatomic or functional asplenia, persons infected with HIV, microbiologists who are routinely exposed to Neisseria meningitidis, and frequent travelers to or people living in areas with high rates of meningococcal disease, such as the African meningitis belt. For children 2 through 6 years of age the dose should be given at an interval of 3 years, for persons older than 6 years, at an interval of 5 years.

Japanese Encephalitis Vaccine: The ACIP voted to include the recently licensed Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) vaccine, Ixiaro, in the list of recommended vaccines for U.S. travelers. Clarifications were also made to the existing recommendations for the use of Japanese encephalitis vaccine. The vaccine is recommended for travelers who will spend 1 month or more in an endemic-disease area during the JEV transmission season, or for short-term travelers if they have an increased risk of JEV exposure. The vaccine is not recommended for short-term travelers whose visit will be restricted to urban areas or times outside of a well-defined JEV transmission season. For more information, please see the Japanese Encephalitis Provisional Recommendation (http://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/recs/provisional/downloads/je-july2009-508.pdf).

Measles-Mumps-Rubella-Varicella Vaccine: Additional language was added to the recommendation for MMRV vaccine regarding combination vaccines versus separate injections of equivalent component vaccines. Combination vaccines are preferred, but considerations should include provider assessment, patient preference, and the potential for adverse events. In addition, a personal or family history of seizures was included as a precaution for MMRV vaccine use.


[The following is cross posted from the "More News & Summaries" section of CDC's Immunization Works electronic newsletter, July 2009.]

HIB BOOSTER DOSE REINSTATED: CDC, in consultation with ACIP, the American Academy of Family Physicians, and the American Academy of Pediatrics, is recommending reinstatement of the booster dose of Haemophilus influenzae type b vaccine for children aged 1215 months who have completed the primary 3-dose series. Infants should continue to receive the primary Hib vaccine series at ages 2, 4, and 6 months. Children aged 1215 months should receive the booster dose on time. Older children for whom the booster dose was deferred should receive their Hib booster dose at the next routinely scheduled visit or medical encounter. Although supply is sufficient to reinstate the booster dose and begin catch-up vaccination, supply is not yet ample enough to support a mass notification process to contact all children with deferred Hib booster doses. For more information, please see the Updated Recommendations for Use of Hib full article in CDC's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report (http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/mm5824a5.htm). Also, CDC has posted Hib Vaccine: Q&A for Providers about the Return to the Hib "Booster" Dose (http://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/vpd-vac/hib/faqs-return-to-booster-hcp.htm).

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3 MMWR publishes report on neurological complications associated with H1N1 influenza in children in May 2009

CDC published "Neurologic Complications Associated with Novel Influenza A (H1N1) Virus Infections in Children--Dallas, Texas, May 2009" in the July 24 issue of MMWR. The opening paragraph of the article is reprinted below.


Neurologic complications, including seizures, encephalitis, encephalopathy, Reye syndrome, and other neurologic disorders, have been described previously in association with respiratory tract infection with seasonal influenza A or B viruses, but not with novel influenza A (H1N1) virus. On May 28, 2009, the Dallas County Department of Health and Human Services (DCHHS) notified CDC of four children with neurologic complications associated with novel influenza A (H1N1) virus infection admitted to hospitals in Dallas County, Texas, during May 18-28. This report summarizes the clinical characteristics of those four cases. Patients were aged 7-17 years and were admitted with signs of influenza-like illness (ILI) and seizures or altered mental status. Three of the four patients had abnormal electroencephalograms (EEGs). In all four patients, novel influenza A (H1N1) viral RNA was detected in nasopharyngeal specimens but not in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Antiviral therapy included oseltamivir (four patients) and rimantadine (three patients). All four patients recovered fully and had no neurologic sequelae at discharge. These findings indicate that, as with seasonal influenza, neurologic complications can occur after respiratory tract infection with novel influenza A (H1N1) virus. For children who have ILI accompanied by unexplained seizures or mental status changes, clinicians should consider acute seasonal influenza or novel influenza A (H1N1) virus infection in the differential diagnosis, send respiratory specimens for appropriate diagnostic testing, and promptly initiate empirical antiviral treatment, especially in hospitalized patients. . . .


To access a web-text (HTML) version of the complete article, go to:
http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/mm5828a2.htm

To access a ready-to-print (PDF) version of this issue of MMWR, go to:
http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/PDF/wk/mm5828.pdf

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4 Four states expand immunization requirements; pharmacists authorized to vaccinate in all 50 states

Florida, Georgia, Nebraska, and Texas have recently expanded their immunization requirements for pre-school or school attendance. In June, Maine became the 50th state to authorize pharmacists to vaccinate. More detailed information follows. [Note: "School year" is abbreviated as SY throughout this IAC Express article.]

INFLUENZA INFORMATION
Florida: On June 10, the governor approved a bill making it a legal requirement that each year, in August or September, certain child care and day care providers distribute detailed information about influenza (i.e., causes, symptoms, and transmission) to the parents of enrolled children. The goal is to educate parents about the importance of annual influenza vaccination of their children. The law went into effect on June 10 and will be implemented in August and September 2009.

Note: At this time, IAC has no chart that lists influenza laws for child care or day care attendance.


MENINGOCOCCAL INFORMATION/VACCINATION
Georgia: On May 5, the governor signed a law requiring schools to provide parents/guardians of students in grades 6 through 12 with information on meningococcal meningitis disease/vaccine. The requirement will be effective for SY 2009-10.

Texas: On March 5, the executive commissioner of Health and Human Services (HHS) approved a revision to the state's administrative code that requires 1 dose of meningococcal conjugate vaccine (MCV) for students entering grade 7. The requirement goes into effect on August 1; it will phase into higher grades, leading up to grade 12 by SY 2014-15.

IAC has compiled a chart of information about all states that have meningococcal prevention mandates for elementary and secondary school attendance. To access the information, go to:
http://www.immunize.org/laws/menin_sec.asp

This information is also depicted visually on a map of the United States. To access the map, go to:
http://www.immunize.org/laws/menin_sec.pdf


TETANUS-DIPHTHERIA-ACELLULAR PERTUSSIS (Tdap) VACCINATION
Nebraska: On May 27, the governor approved a requirement for a one-time dose of Tdap vaccine for all students entering grade 7. The requirement becomes effective on July 1, 2010.

Texas: On March 5, the executive commissioner of HHS approved a revision to the state's administrative code that requires a one-time dose of Tdap for all students entering grade 7. The requirement goes into effect on August 1; it will phase into higher grades, leading up to grade 12 by SY 2014-15.

IAC has compiled a chart of information about all states that require Tdap vaccination for middle school and high school attendance. To access the information, go to:
http://www.immunize.org/laws/tdap_mandates.pdf

This information is also depicted visually on a map of the United States. To access the map, go to:
http://www.immunize.org/laws/tdap.pdf 


HEPATITIS A VACCINATION
Texas: On March 5, the executive commissioner of HHS approved a revision to the state's administrative code that requires evidence of 2 doses of hepatitis A vaccine for students entering kindergarten. The requirement goes into effect on August 1; it will phase into higher grades, leading up to grade 12 by SY 2021-22.

IAC has compiled a chart of information about all states that have hepatitis A prevention mandates for day care and school attendance. To access the information, go to:
http://www.immunize.org/laws/hepa.asp


MEASLES-MUMPS-RUBELLA (MMR) VACCINATION
Texas: On March 5, the executive commissioner of HHS approved a revision to the state's administrative code that requires evidence of 2 doses of MMR vaccine for students entering kindergarten. The requirement goes into effect on August 1; it will phase into higher grades, leading up to grade 12 by SY 2021-22.

CDC has compiled a chart of information about all states that require 2 doses of measles-containing vaccine for kindergarten entry. To access the information, go to:
http://www.immunize.org/laws/mmr_kinder_2nddose.pdf Note: the information is current for SY 2007-08; CDC has not yet updated it for SY 2009-10.


VARICELLA VACCINATION
Texas: On March 5, the executive commissioner of HHS approved a revision to the state's administrative code that requires evidence of 2 doses of varicella vaccine for students entering either kindergarten or grade 7 (disease history of chickenpox may be substituted for varicella vaccine). The requirement goes into effect on August 1; it will phase into higher grades, leading up to grade 12 by SY 2014-15.

IAC has compiled a chart of information about all states that require 2 doses of varicella vaccine for child care and school attendance. To access the information, go to:
http://www.immunize.org/laws/var2_mandates.pdf

This information is also depicted visually on a map of the United States. To access the map, go to:
http://www.immunize.org/laws/vari_two.pdf


PHARMACIST AUTHORIZATION TO VACCINATE
Maine: On June 9, the governor signed legislation that will allow licensed pharmacists to administer certain drugs and vaccines.

IAC has compiled a chart of information about all states that authorize pharmacists to administer vaccinations. To access the information, go to:
http://www.immunize.org/laws/#pharm

This information is also depicted visually on a map of the United States. To access the map, go to:
http://www.immunize.org/pdfs/pharm.pdf


WANT MORE INFORMATION ON STATE IMMUNIZATION MANDATES?
To access more information about state mandates, visit our State Mandates on Immunization and Vaccine-Preventable Diseases web section at http://www.immunize.org/laws

IAC Express depends on readers to help us stay informed and ensure our website contains the most current and accurate information available. Please let us know when any changes occur in your state by emailing us at admin@immunize.org

The CDC website has a section of resources on immunization requirements for school attendance, healthcare workers, patients in various healthcare settings, and residents of various institutional settings. Among the resources is a searchable database on state immunization laws. To access this section of resources, go to:

http://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/vac-gen/laws/default.htm

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5 FDA approves seasonal influenza vaccines for 2009-10; package inserts for all vaccines are on IAC's website

On July 20, FDA issued a press release announcing that it has approved the vaccine for 2009-10 seasonal influenza. A portion of it is reprinted below.

Editor's note: The press release includes the brand names of the six vaccines approved for use during the 2009-10 seasonal influenza season. At the end of this IAC Express article, readers will find links to IAC's package inserts web page for the 2009-10 live attenuated influenza vaccine (LAIV) and 2009-10 trivalent inactivated influenza vaccines (TIV; injectable).


The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today announced that it has approved a vaccine for 2009-2010 seasonal influenza in the United States.

The seasonal influenza vaccine will not protect against the 2009 H1N1 influenza virus that resulted in the declaration of a pandemic by the World Health Organization (WHO) on June 11, 2009. The FDA continues to work with manufacturers, international partners, and other government agencies to facilitate the availability of a safe and effective vaccine against the 2009 H1N1 influenza virus. . . .

The vaccine for the 2009-2010 seasonal influenza contains:
  • an A/Brisbane/59/2007 (H1N1)-like virus
  • an A/Brisbane/10/2007 (H3N2)-like virus
  • a B/Brisbane/60/2008-like virus . . . .

To access the complete press release, go to:
http://www.fda.gov/NewsEvents/Newsroom/PressAnnouncements/ucm172772.htm

PACKAGE INSERTS NOW AVAILABLE

To access IAC's web page of package inserts for FluMist (LAIV), go to:
http://www.immunize.org/packageinserts/pi_laiv.asp

To access IAC's web page of package inserts for TIV, go to:
http://www.immunize.org/packageinserts/pi_tiv.asp

To access IAC's index page of package inserts for 25 vaccine, go to:
http://www.immunize.org/packageinserts

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6 CDC summarizes H1N1 influenza situation and advises the healthcare community and public on ways to stay informed

[The following is cross posted from the "More News & Summaries" section of CDC's Immunization Works electronic newsletter, July 2009.]

NOVEL H1N1 INFLUENZA UPDATE: CDC estimates that there have been at least one million cases of novel H1N1 influenza in the United States. CDC's goals during this public health emergency are to reduce transmission and illness severity, and to provide information to assist healthcare providers, public health officials, and the public in addressing the challenges posed by this newly identified influenza virus.

Vaccines are a very important part of a response to pandemic influenza. CDC has isolated the novel H1N1 virus, made a candidate vaccine virus strain that can be used to create vaccine, and has provided this virus to industry so they can begin scaling up for production of a vaccine. It is expected that novel H1N1 influenza vaccine may be available as early as mid-October. On July 8, 2009, CDC issued guidance for state and local public health departments to assist them in planning for a novel H1N1 influenza vaccine campaign (http://www.cdc.gov/h1n1flu/vaccination/statelocal/planning.htm).

For the latest information about the novel Influenza A (H1N1) outbreak and CDC's response, visit CDC's H1N1 influenza website (http://www.cdc.gov/h1n1flu), sign up to receive CDC email updates (https://service.govdelivery.com/service/subscribe.html?code=USCDC_53), subscribe to RSS (http://www.cdc.gov/h1n1flu/rss), or follow CDC Emergency on Twitter (http://twitter.com/cdcemergency).

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7 IAC's Video of the Week presents HHS Secretary Sebelius explaining the 2009 Flu Prevention PSA contest

IAC encourages IAC Express readers to watch a 1-minute video that encourages people to create a 15-, 30-, or 60-second public service announcement (PSA) that will inform and motivate people to take steps that will help prevent the spread of influenza. In the video, Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) Secretary Kathleen Sebelius presents details about the contest rules.

The video will be available on the home page of IAC's website through August 2. To access it, go to: http://www.immunize.org and click on the image under the words Video of the Week. It may take a few moments for the video to begin playing; please be patient!

Remember to bookmark IAC's home page to view a new video every Monday. To view an IAC Video of the Week from the past, go to the video archive at http://www.immunize.org/votw/jun09.asp

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8 IAC's padded screening questionnaires for contraindications have English on front, Spanish on back--added value at no added cost!

In response to demand, IAC now has a Spanish-language translation of the questions on its padded Screening Questionnaire for Child and Teen Immunization and Screening Questionnaire for Adult Immunization. Printed on the back of the English page, the Spanish page has been added to this product at no additional cost.

The questionnaires give you and your patients a quick, easy, and thorough way to determine if they have contraindications and precautions to vaccination. Patients fill out the questionnaire with yes-or-no answers while waiting to be seen, allowing you to review their responses quickly and be confident you're not missing any contraindications or precautions.

The questionnaires come in convenient tear-off pads of 100 sheets. The price per pad is economical (discounts for two pads or more), so you'll be able to keep pads at the receptionist's desk, the nurse's station, and in every exam room. Each pad comes with four English-language reference sheets (printed on heavy-weight paper) for health professionals.

Prices start at $16 each for one pad and drop to $12 each for two, $11 each for three, and $10 each for four. For quotes on larger quantities or customizing, call (651) 647-9009 or email admininfo@immunize.org

To learn more about the padded screening questionnaires, or to order online or download an order form, visit

Screening Questionnaire for Child and Teen Immunization
http://www.immunize.org/shop/pad_sqchild.asp

Screening Questionnaire for Adult Immunization
http://www.immunize.org/shop/pad_sqadult.asp

IAC's offers other products for sale, including educational videos and personal immunization record cards, at http://www.immunize.org/shop

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9 July issue of CDC's Immunization Works electronic newsletter recently released

CDC recently released the July issue of its monthly newsletter Immunization Works and posted it on the website of the National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases (NCIRD). The newsletter offers the immunization community information about current topics. The information is in the public domain and can be reproduced and circulated widely.

Some of the information in the July issue has already appeared in previous issues of IAC Express. Following is the text of some articles we have not covered.


MEETINGS, CONFERENCES &RESOURCES

IMMUNIZATION UPDATE 2009: Please mark your calendars for the July 30, 2009, Live Satellite Broadcast and Webcast from CDC's National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases. This 2.5-hour program focuses on the most recent developments in the rapidly changing field of immunization, including new vaccine recommendations. The event will take place from 9:00 AM-11:30 AM and noon-2:30 PM Eastern time. For more information, visit CDC's Immunization Education and Training Webcasts web page (http://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/ed/webcasts.htm).


RESPIRATORY NEWS AND RESOURCES

MENINGITIS WEBSITE: A new CDC Meningitis website (http://www.cdc.gov/meningitis) was launched June 24. The site contains comprehensive information on bacterial, viral, and other types of meningitis, as well as on meningococcal vaccines. Links on the site lead to a variety of additional educational and vaccine-related resources.

WORLD PNEUMONIA DAY: Mark your calendars for "World Pneumonia Day", November 2, 2009. This event--led by child health groups and Save the Children Artist Ambassadors Gwyneth Paltrow and Hugh Laurie--will bring needed attention to a neglected disease that kills more than two million children under the age of five each year, worldwide. For more information or to sign up to receive email updates, visit the World Pneumonia Day website (http://www.worldpneumoniaday.org).

To access the complete July issue from the NCIRD website, go to:
http://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/news/newsltrs/imwrks/2009/200907.htm

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10.  Clinical trials to test two candidate H1N1 influenza vaccines to begin soon

On July 22, the National Institutes of Health (NIH) issued a press release, "NIAID Set to Launch Clinical Trials to Test 2009 H1N1 Influenza Vaccine Candidates." Portions of the press release are reprinted below.


Scientists in a network of medical research institutions across the United States are set to begin a series of clinical trials to gather critical data about influenza vaccines, including two candidate H1N1 flu vaccines. The research will be under the direction of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), part of the National Institutes of Health.

"With the emergence of the 2009 H1N1 influenza virus, we have undertaken a collaborative and efficient process of vaccine development that is proceeding in stepwise fashion," says NIAID Director Anthony S. Fauci, MD.

After the isolation and characterization of the virus, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention generated and distributed a 2009 H1N1 seed virus to vaccine manufacturers for the development of vaccine pilot lots for testing in clinical trials.

"Now, NIAID will use our longstanding vaccine clinical trials infrastructure--the Vaccine and Treatment Evaluation Units--to help quickly evaluate these pilot lots to determine whether the vaccines are safe and to assess their ability to induce protective immune responses," says Dr. Fauci. "These data will be factored into the decision about how and if to implement a 2009 H1N1 flu immunization program this fall." . . . .

To access the complete press release, go to:
http://www.nih.gov/news/health/jul2009/niaid-22.htm

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11.  CDC's H1N1 influenza web section updated with Q&As on H1N1 influenza vaccine development and more

CDC recently posted new or updated information to various sub-sections of its H1N1 Flu web section. Following are the titles and URLs of documents that have been posted since the July 20 issue of IAC Express:

CDC Novel H1N1 Vaccination Planning Q&A [provides answers, to the extent they are now known, on H1N1 influenza vaccine purchase, distribution, allocation, and administration] http://www.cdc.gov/h1n1flu/vaccination/statelocal/qa.htm

Questions & Answers: Novel H1N1 Influenza Vaccine http://www.cdc.gov/h1n1flu/vaccination/public/vaccination_qa_pub.htm

H1N1 Monitoring Questions & Answers [Q&As about CDC's novel H1N1 influenza surveillance] http://www.cdc.gov/h1n1flu/reportingqa.htm

CDC Interim Guidance for People who have Close Contact with Pigs in Non-commercial Settings: Preventing the Spread of Influenza A Viruses, Including the Novel Influenza A (H1N1) Virus http://www.cdc.gov/h1n1flu/guidelines_pig_workers.htm

FOR MORE INFORMATION
The home page of CDC's H1N1 Flu web section can be accessed from http://www.cdc.gov/h1n1flu

IAC has gathered information related to H1N1 influenza in a single web section at http://www.immunize.org/h1n1

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12.  Engaging booklet helps the public evaluate science articles that appear in the media

The London-based organization Sense about Science has a downloadable 8-page booklet that healthcare professionals may want to make their patients aware of. Titled "I don't know what to believe . . . making sense of science stories," the booklet explains the peer review process in simple, everyday language. It is intended to help its readers know what to look for in judging the validity of scientific information presented in the mainstream media.

To access the booklet, go to:
http://www.senseaboutscience.org.uk/pdf/ShortPeerReviewGuide.pdf

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13.  It's easy to give patients basic immunization information with CDC's attractive, formatted articles

If your health department, clinic, or practice creates a publication for patients, you may be interested in learning that CDC's online newsroom provides formatted one-page articles at no cost. Intended for use in any publication, the articles present basic information on various health topics, including immunization.

You can get publication-ready articles by following the steps outlined in the three paragraphs that appear under the Get Email Updates subhead on this page:
http://www.cdc.gov/media/subtopic/matte.htm

To review the text and graphic images presented in immunization-specific articles, go to: http://www.cdc.gov/media/subtopic/matte/matteDisease.htm Scroll down and click on the appropriate graphic image.

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14.  FREE online CE course on best practices in childhood and adolescent immunization now available

The National Committee for Quality Assurance (NCQA) is offering a free online continuing education (CE) program, Best Practices in Childhood and Adolescent Immunization. Intended for physicians, registered nurses, pharmacists, and other treating practitioners, the program is approved for 1.5 contact hours.

For additional information, go to:
http://www.ncqa.org/tabid/82/Default.aspx and click on the appropriate graphic image.

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Immunization Action Coalition  •  1573 Selby Ave  •  St. Paul, MN 55104
tel 651-647-9009  •  fax 651-647-9131
 
This website is supported in part by a cooperative agreement from the National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases (Grant No. 5U38IP000290) at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in Atlanta, GA. The website content is the sole responsibility of IAC and does not necessarily represent the official views of CDC.