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Immunization Action Coalition
IAC Express 2009
Issue number 809: July 6, 2009
Please click here to subscribe to IAC Express as well as other FREE IAC periodicals.
Contents of this Issue
Select a title to jump to the article.
  1. Reminder: July 2009 issue of Needle Tips now available online
  2. CDC posts Q&As for providers about reinstating the Hib booster dose
  3. CDC's novel H1N1 web section updated with guidance on treating pregnant women, podcast on preventing novel H1N1 infection at camp, and Q&A for the public
  4. Joint Commission's free monograph presents strategies for increasing influenza vaccination rates among healthcare personnel
  5. IAC redesigns the anthrax, chickenpox, diphtheria, and hepatitis A pages of its Diseases & Vaccines web section; 16 other pages previously redesigned
  6. IAC's Video of the Week tells the story of the only unvaccinated rabies survivor and her medical treatment
  7. CDC reports on hepatitis A vaccination coverage of U.S. children ages 24-35 months during 2006-07
  8. U.S. to provide antiviral medication to Latin America and the Caribbean for novel influenza A (H1N1)
  9. Order laminated U.S. immunization schedules today
  10. VIS translation: VIS for PPSV now available in Tagalog
  11. Midwest Viral Hepatitis Summit planned for September 18 in Columbus, OH
  12. Conference on aging and immunity is scheduled for September 21-23 in Siena, Italy
 
Abbreviations
AAFP, American Academy of Family Physicians; AAP, American Academy of Pediatrics; ACIP, Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices; AMA, American Medical Association; CDC, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention; FDA, Food and Drug Administration; IAC, Immunization Action Coalition; MMWR, Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report; NCIRD, National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases; NIVS, National Influenza Vaccine Summit; VIS, Vaccine Information Statement; VPD, vaccine-preventable disease; WHO, World Health Organization.
  
Issue 809: July 6, 2009
1.  Reminder: July 2009 issue of Needle Tips now available online

The July 2009 issue of Needle Tips is now available for viewing and downloading. It is the first issue in Needle Tips history that is available only electronically--it is not being distributed in print by U.S. mail.

If you prefer to receive information on paper rather than online, you can print out the entire 24-page issue and read it at your convenience. The PDF file is quite large (1.9 MB).

To download the entire issue for printing, go to:
http://www.immunize.org/nslt.d/n40/n40.pdf

If you prefer to print out the issue a section at a time, go to: http://www.immunize.org/nt and click on each section you want to print.

Whether you print the issue or read it online, we encourage you to navigate the content of the issue by using some of the more than 200 clickable links located throughout.

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2 CDC posts Q&As for providers about reinstating the Hib booster dose

On June 26, CDC published "Updated Recommendations for Use of Haemophilus Influenzae Type b (Hib) Vaccine: Reinstatement of the Booster Dose at Ages 12-15 Months" in MMWR (covered in IAC Express #808). If you missed the MMWR article, you can access it at http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/mm5824a5.htm

On July 1, CDC posted related Q&As online titled, "Hib Vaccine--Q&A for Providers about the Return to the Hib 'Booster' Dose."

To access this web page, go to:
http://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/vpd-vac/hib/faqs-return-to-booster-hcp.htm

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3 CDC's novel H1N1 web section updated with guidance on treating pregnant women, podcast on preventing novel H1N1 infection at camp, and Q&A for the public

CDC recently posted new or updated information to three sub-sections of its H1N1 Flu web section. Following are the titles and URLs of documents that have been posted since the June 29 issue of IAC Express.

FROM THE "H1N1 FLU CLINICAL AND PUBLIC HEALTH GUIDANCE" SUB-SECTION UPDATE: Pregnant Women and Novel Influenza A (H1N1) Virus:
Considerations for Clinicians
http://www.cdc.gov/h1n1flu/clinician_pregnant.htm

FROM THE "PODCASTS AT CDC" SECTION
Novel H1N1 Flu and Camp (English only; 2-minute run time; script available)
http://www2a.cdc.gov/podcasts/player.asp?f=13124

FROM THE "H1N1 FLU (SWINE FLU): GENERAL INFORMATION" SUBSECTION UPDATE: Novel H1N1 Flu (Swine Flu) and You (new Q&A: If I have a family member at home who is sick, should I go to work?)
http://www.cdc.gov/h1n1flu/qa.htm


The home page of CDC's H1N1 Flu web section can be accessed from http://www.cdc.gov/h1n1flu

IAC has gathered important information related to H1N1 influenza in a new web section to make it easier to keep up to date with developments. To access this resource, go to: http://www.immunize.org/h1n1

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4 Joint Commission's free monograph presents strategies for increasing influenza vaccination rates among healthcare personnel

The Joint Commission recently released a downloadable monograph intended to help healthcare organizations improve the rate of healthcare worker influenza vaccinations. It is titled "Providing a Safer Environment for Health Care Personnel and Patients through Influenza Vaccination: Strategies from Research and Practice."

The monograph includes information about seasonal influenza and the influenza vaccine, barriers to successful programs and strategies for overcoming them, and examples of successful initiatives organizations have used to improve their influenza vaccination rates.

To access the monograph, go to:
http://www.jointcommission.org/PatientSafety/InfectionControl/flu_monograph.htm

To access a press release with additional information about the monograph and how it was developed, go to:
http://www.jointcommission.org/NewsRoom/NewsReleases/nr_062409.htm

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5 IAC redesigns the anthrax, chickenpox, diphtheria, and hepatitis A pages of its Diseases & Vaccines web section; 16 other pages previously redesigned

IAC recently redesigned four pages of its Diseases & Vaccines web section. The pages--anthrax, chickenpox, diphtheria, and hepatitis A--now offer website users easy access to resources from IAC, other organizations, professional journals, and government agencies.

To access the redesigned anthrax page, go to:
http://www.immunize.org/anthrax

To access the redesigned chickenpox (varicella) page, go to:
http://www.immunize.org/varicella

To access the redesigned diphtheria page, go to:
http://www.immunize.org/diphtheria

To access the redesigned hepatitis A page, go to:
http://www.immunize.org/hepa

In the past several months IAC redesigned 16 other pages of its Diseases & Vaccines web section, which we have not presented in previous issues of IAC Express. Following are URLs that will take you to those pages:

To access the redesigned Hib page, go to:
http://www.immunize.org/hib

To access the redesigned H1N1 influenza page, go to:
http://www.immunize.org/h1n1

To access the redesigned seasonal influenza page, go to:
http://www.immunize.org/influenza

To access the redesigned measles page, go to:
http://www.immunize.org/measles

To access the redesigned meningococcal page, go to:
http://www.immunize.org/mening

To access the redesigned mumps page, go to:
http://www.immunize.org/mumps

To access the redesigned pertussis page, go to:
http://www.immunize.org/pertussis

To access the redesigned pneumococcal conjugate (PCV) page, go to:
http://www.immunize.org/pneumoconj

To access the redesigned pneumococcal polysaccharide (PPSV) page, go to:
http://www.immunize.org/pneumopoly

To access the redesigned polio page, go to:
http://www.immunize.org/polio

To access the redesigned rabies page, go to:
http://www.immunize.org/rabies

To access the redesigned rotavirus page, go to:
http://www.immunize.org/rotavirus

To access the redesigned rubella page, go to:
http://www.immunize.org/rubella

To access the redesigned shingles (zoster) page, go to:
http://www.immunize.org/zoster

To access the redesigned smallpox page, go to:
http://www.immunize.org/smallpox

To access the redesigned tetanus page, go to:
http://www.immunize.org/tetanus

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6 IAC's Video of the Week tells the story of the only unvaccinated rabies survivor and her medical treatment

IAC encourages IAC Express readers to watch a 47-minute video (presented as five individual segments) that chronicles the story of Wisconsin teenager Jeanna Giese, the only unvaccinated person ever recorded to have survived rabies. The video, which originally aired on the TV program "Extraordinary People," follows Giese's case and the medical treatment protocol that led to her survival.

The video will be available on the home page of IAC's website through July 12. To access it, go to: http://www.immunize.org and click on the image under the words Video of the Week, which you'll find toward the top of the page. It may take a few moments for the video to begin playing; please be patient!

Remember to bookmark IAC's home page to view a new video every Monday. While you're at our home page, we encourage you to browse around--you're sure to find resources and information that will enhance your practice's immunization delivery.

All the videos featured as an IAC Video of the Week have recently been archived in a new section of IAC's website. To view any of the videos previously featured, go to: http://www.immunize.org/votw/jun09.asp

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7 CDC reports on hepatitis A vaccination coverage of U.S. children ages 24-35 months during 2006-07

CDC published "Hepatitis A Vaccination Coverage Among Children Aged 24-35 Months--United States, 2006 and 2007" in the July 3 issue of MMWR. Portions of the article are reprinted below.


During 1995-1996, hepatitis A vaccines were licensed in the United States as 2-dose regimens for children aged >=24 months. In 1996, the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) recommended vaccinating children aged >=24 months who lived in communities or states with high rates of hepatitis A. In 1999, ACIP updated its guidelines, recommending routine vaccination for children aged >=24 months in areas with hepatitis A rates twice the national average, and recommending consideration of routine vaccination in areas with rates higher than the national average. However, in 2005, this regional vaccination strategy was reevaluated because national hepatitis A rates had decreased to such an extent that differences among states were no longer substantial. Additionally, in 2005, hepatitis A vaccine was licensed for children aged 12-23 months. As a result of these developments, in 2006, ACIP expanded its hepatitis A vaccination recommendation to all children in the United States and reduced the recommended age for vaccination to 12-23 months. This report updates previous findings regarding hepatitis A vaccination coverage, providing estimates based on National Immunization Survey (NIS) data for 2006 and 2007. From 2006 to 2007, estimated national hepatitis A vaccination coverage levels among children aged 24-35 months who received at least 1 dose increased from 26.3% to 47.4%. The increase in hepatitis A vaccination coverage likely is the result of the expanded 2006 ACIP recommendations; adherence to these recommendations should lead to further declines in hepatitis A incidence in the United States. . . .

Editorial Note:
The estimated 21.1% increase in hepatitis A vaccination coverage observed in 2007 overall in the United States, and particularly among those 33 states where no previous recommendation was in effect, likely resulted in large part from the 2006 ACIP recommendations that expanded use of hepatitis A vaccine to children nationwide and reduced the recommended age for vaccination from >=24 months to 12-23 months. The percentage of children in compliance with the well-child visit recommendations of the American Academy of Pediatrics has been found substantially higher among infants and children aged <24 months, when well-child visits are more frequent, than children aged >=24 months, when such visits occur annually. Therefore, incorporation of hepatitis A vaccine into the routine early childhood vaccination schedule was an important strategy to improve vaccination coverage after the 2006 ACIP recommendation.

Compared with the prevaccination era, the number of cases and rates of acute hepatitis A in the United States have declined substantially. Historically, hepatitis A rates have differed by race/ethnicity. In the prevaccination era, rates of acute hepatitis A were five times greater among AI/ANs [American Indian/Alaska Native] and three times greater among Hispanics than the national average. However, after several years of focused efforts to increase hepatitis A vaccination in AI/AN communities, during 2001-2007, hepatitis A rates among AI/ANs were lower than rates among persons in other racial/ethnic populations. In 2007, the hepatitis A rate was 0.5 cases per 100,000 population among AI/ANs and 1.4 cases per 100,000 population among Hispanics (a decline of 94% since 1997). In this report, the significantly higher percentages in 2006 and 2007 of hepatitis A vaccination coverage among AI/AN and Hispanic children compared with non-Hispanic white children likely reflect earlier emphasis on these minority populations in areas with elevated rates of hepatitis A and exemplify the substantial progress made toward eliminating racial/ethnic disparities. . . .


To access a web-text (HTML) version of the complete article, go to:
http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/mm5825a1.htm

To access a ready-to-print (PDF) version of this issue of MMWR, go to:
http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/PDF/wk/mm5825.pdf

To receive a FREE electronic subscription to MMWR (which includes new ACIP recommendations), go to:
http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/mmwrsubscribe.html

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8 U.S. to provide antiviral medication to Latin America and the Caribbean for novel influenza A (H1N1)

On July 2, the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) issued a press release announcing that the U.S. will provide the antiviral medication Tamiflu to Latin America and the Caribbean. Portions of the press release are reprinted below.


HHS Secretary Kathleen Sebelius announced today that the United States will provide 420,000 treatment courses of Tamiflu (Oseltamavir) to the Pan-American Health Organization (PAHO) to fight the novel H1N1 influenza in Latin America and the Caribbean.

The Secretary made the announcement while attending a series of high-level meetings for health ministers throughout the Americas in Cancun, Mexico.

"The U.S. is committed to supporting and enhancing the health security in the region by reducing transmission and severity of illness," Sebelius told officials in Cancun. "Viruses know no borders. The U.S. recognizes that a novel virus such as the H1N1 is a burden borne by all nations, and all of us have a responsibility to help support one another in the face of this challenge." . . . .

To access the entire press release, go to:
http://www.hhs.gov/news/press/2009pres/07/20090702a.html

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9 Order laminated U.S. immunization schedules today

IAC has two laminated immunization schedules for 2009--one for children/teens ages 0 through 18 years and one for adults. Based on CDC's 2009 immunization schedules, the laminated schedules offer two significant advantages over paper schedules:

(1) They are covered with a tough, washable coating that lets them stand up to a year's worth of use as at-your-fingertips guides to immunization and as teaching tools you can use to give patients and parents authoritative immunization information.

(2) Each schedule includes a guide to vaccine contraindications and precautions, an additional feature that will help you to make on-the-spot determinations about vaccinating patients of any age.

IAC's laminated schedules come complete with essential footnotes and are printed in color for easy reading. Each schedule has six pages (i.e., three double-sided pages), and when folded, measures 8.5" x 11".

For specific information about the child/teen schedule, to view images of it, or to order online or download an order form, visit http://www.immunize.org/shop/schedule_child.asp

For specific information about the adult schedule, to view images of it, or to order online or download an order form, visit http://www.immunize.org/shop/schedule_adult.asp

Prices start at $10 each for 1-4 copies and drop to $6.50 each for 5-19 copies. Discount pricing is available for 20 or more copies. For quotes on customizing or placing orders in excess of 999 schedules, call (651) 647-9009 or email admininfo@immunize.org

To learn about other essential immunization resources available for purchase from IAC, such as personal immunization record cards, padded screening questionnaires, and educational videos, go to: http://www.immunize.org/shop

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10.  VIS translation: VIS for PPSV now available in Tagalog

Dated 4/16/09, the current VIS for pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine (PPSV) is now available in Tagalog. IAC gratefully acknowledges the Immunization Branch, California Department of Public Health for the translation.

For the Tagalog version of the VIS for PPSV, go to:
http://www.immunize.org/vis/ta_ppsv.pdf

For the English version of the VIS for PPSV, go to:
http://www.immunize.org/vis/pneum3.pdf

NOTE: The VIS for PPSV comes in additional languages, including Spanish. To access them, go to: http://www.immunize.org/vis/vis_ppsv.asp Click on the link to the pertinent language.

For information about the use of VISs, and for VISs in more than 35 languages, visit IAC's VIS web section at http://www.immunize.org/vis

For general information about VISs from CDC's website go to: http://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/pubs/vis

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11.  Midwest Viral Hepatitis Summit planned for September 18 in Columbus, OH

Hepatitis Foundation International is sponsoring the Midwest Viral Hepatitis Summit, a professional education and training event. It will be held on September 18 in Columbus, OH.

For comprehensive information about the program and for registration information, go to:
http://hepatitisfoundation.org/pdfs/09SummitFinal.pdf

For additional information, call (800) 891-0707.

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12.  Conference on aging and immunity is scheduled for September 21-23 in Siena, Italy

A seminar on aging and immunity is planned for September 21-23 at Novartis Campus, Siena, Italy.

For information on the conference program and registration, go to: http://www.fondation-merieux.org/?-Conferences,176- Scroll down the listings under the heading "Conferences & Events 2009" to the entry for 21-23 September 2009, and click on the pertinent link.

For additional information, email Catherine Dutel at catherine.dutel@fondation-merieux.org

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This website is supported in part by a cooperative agreement from the National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases (Grant No. 5U38IP000290) at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in Atlanta, GA. The website content is the sole responsibility of IAC and does not necessarily represent the official views of CDC.