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Immunization Action Coalition
IAC Express 2009
Issue number 782: February 23, 2009
Please click here to subscribe to IAC Express as well as other FREE IAC periodicals.
Contents of this Issue
Select a title to jump to the article.
  1. IAC's Video of the Week features CNN broadcaster Campbell Brown's plea to parents to get their children vaccinated
  2. HHS letter to clinicians outlines the Hib vaccine schedule to use during the current vaccine shortage
  3. IAC updates two popular "how-to" vaccine administration print pieces
  4. IAC updates standing orders for administering pneumococcal vaccine to adults and rotavirus vaccine to children
  5. NNii's science-based essay on vaccines and autism is an excellent resource for parents and the public
  6. February issue of the AAP Immunization Initiatives Newsletter answers frequently asked immunization coding questions
  7. Free "Shots 2009" software for the new adult, child, teen, and catch-up immunization schedules is now available
  8. CDC offers health departments and coalitions abundant resources to plan for and promote National Infant Immunization Week
  9. "One And Only" campaign teaches clinicians and patients that syringes should be used only once
  10. Important: Be sure to give influenza vaccine throughout the influenza season--through the spring months
  11. MMWR publishes report on progress Europe made toward measles elimination during 2005-08
  12. Online course on preventing meningococcal disease offers clinicians CE credit
  13. Key health communication lessons from the global initiative to eradicate polio will be explored at March 13 event in Washington, DC
  14. WHO's tables of immunization recommendations will aid countries in reviewing and improving immunization schedules
  15. Minnesota Coalition for Adult Immunization conference scheduled for March 13 in Chaska
  16. Illinois Immunization and Communicable Disease Conference and Downstate Preparedness Response Summit set for June 8-10 in Springfield
 
Abbreviations
AAFP, American Academy of Family Physicians; AAP, American Academy of Pediatrics; ACIP, Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices; AMA, American Medical Association; CDC, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention; FDA, Food and Drug Administration; IAC, Immunization Action Coalition; MMWR, Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report; NCIRD, National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases; NIVS, National Influenza Vaccine Summit; VIS, Vaccine Information Statement; VPD, vaccine-preventable disease; WHO, World Health Organization.
  
Issue 782: February 23, 2009
1.  IAC's Video of the Week features CNN broadcaster Campbell Brown's plea to parents to get their children vaccinated

IAC encourages IAC Express readers to watch a two-minute video that aired on CNN on February 13, the day after the U.S. Court of Federal Claims ruled that MMR vaccine is not a cause of autism. In her video commentary, CNN broadcast journalist Campbell Brown unequivocally states, "The verdict is in. There is no connection between vaccines and autism. And it is time that all of us get our children vaccinated." She continues by pleading with parents to get their children vaccinated for their own good and for the good of the larger community.

The video will be available on the home page of IAC's website through March 1. To access it, go to: http://www.immunize.org and click on the image under the words Video of the Week, which you'll find toward the top of the page. It may take a few moments for the video to begin playing; please be patient!

Remember to bookmark IAC's home page to view a new video every Monday. While you're at our home page, we encourage you to browse around--you're sure to find resources and information that will enhance your practice's immunization delivery.

To view IAC's video collection, go to:
http://www.vaccineinformation.org/video

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2 HHS letter to clinicians outlines the Hib vaccine schedule to use during the current vaccine shortage

On February 10, the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) issued a letter to clinicians that stresses that it is important for all children to receive the 3-dose primary series of Hib-containing vaccine. Even during the current vaccine shortage, there is enough vaccine to ensure that all children receive the primary series (at 2, 4, and 6 months). The letter presents information on vaccinating children who are not at increased risk of developing Hib disease, as well as information on vaccinating children who are at increased risk.

To access the letter and information about the Hib vaccine shortage, go to:
http://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/vac-gen/shortages/downloads/hcp-hib-notice-feb09-508.pdf

For additional information on the Hib vaccine shortage, go to: http://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/vac-gen/shortages Scroll down to the chart titled Chart of Vaccines in Delay or Shortage and click on the pertinent links in the section titled Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib).

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3 IAC updates two popular "how-to" vaccine administration print pieces

IAC recently updated its information sheet "How to Administer IM and SC Injections" and its reference table "Administering Vaccines to Adults: Dose, Route, Site, Needle Size, and Preparation."

On "How to Administer IM and SC Injections," information in the sections on patient age, injection site, and needle size was revised, and a note was added about needle length. On "Administering Vaccines to Adults: Dose, Route, Site, Needle Size, and Preparation," a note was added about needle length. Other minor revisions were made to both pieces.

To access the revised "How to Administer IM and SC Injections," go to: http://www.immunize.org/catg.d/p2020.pdf

To access the revised "Administering Vaccines to Adults: Dose, Route, Site, Needle Size, and Preparation" go to: http://www.immunize.org/catg.d/p3084.pdf

IAC's Print Materials web section offers healthcare professionals and the public approximately 250 FREE English-language materials (many also available in translation), which we encourage website users to print out, copy, and distribute widely. To access all of IAC's free print materials, go to:
http://www.immunize.org/printmaterials

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4 IAC updates standing orders for administering pneumococcal vaccine to adults and rotavirus vaccine to children

IAC recently revised two of its standing orders protocols: On "Standing Orders for Administering Pneumococcal Vaccine to Adults," cigarette smokers and people with asthma were added to the vaccination criteria. On "Standing Orders for Administering Rotavirus Vaccine to Infants," the age at which the final dose of vaccine can be administered was changed to "before age 8 months 0 days." Other minor changes were made to both pieces.

To access the revised "Standing Orders for Administering Pneumococcal Vaccine to Adults," go to:
http://www.immunize.org/catg.d/p3075.pdf

To access the revised "Standing Orders for Administering Rotavirus Vaccine to Infants," go to:
http://www.immunize.org/catg.d/p3087.pdf

To access a table with links to all IAC's standing orders protocols for vaccine administration and medical management of vaccine reactions, as well as standing orders for newborn-nursery hepatitis B vaccination, go to: http://www.immunize.org/standingorders

IAC's Print Materials web section offers healthcare professionals and the public approximately 250 FREE English-language materials (many also available in translation), which we encourage website users to print out, copy, and distribute widely. To access all of IAC's free print materials, go to:
http://www.immunize.org/printmaterials

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5 NNii's science-based essay on vaccines and autism is an excellent resource for parents and the public

The National Network for Immunization Information (NNii) recently added an essay to its website that outlines the scientific evidence showing that there is no association between vaccines and autism. The essay is adapted from chapter 8 of the book "Do Vaccines Cause That?! A Guide for Evaluating Vaccine Concerns." The book is written by Martin Myers, MD, and Diego Pineda, MS. They are, respectively, the editor and the science writer for NNii.

To access the essay, go to:
http://www.immunizationinfo.org/thimerosal_mercury_detail.cfv?id=146

The book "Do Vaccines Cause That?!" is available at bookstores and at DoVaccinesCauseThat.com (http://www.dovaccinescausethat.com).

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6 February issue of the AAP Immunization Initiatives Newsletter answers frequently asked immunization coding questions

The February issue of the AAP Immunization Initiatives Newsletter includes an article titled "Immunization Coding Questions and Answers from the AAP Coding Hotline."

To access the February issue, go to:
http://www.cispimmunize.org/resour/pdf/February2009_enews.pdf

To be added to the newsletter listserv, email cispimmunize@aap.org with "Newsletter" in the subject line and your name and email address in the body of the email.

To access archived issues, go to:
http://www.cispimmunize.org/resour/rsc_main.html

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7 Free "Shots 2009" software for the new adult, child, teen, and catch-up immunization schedules is now available

The "Shots 2009" quick-reference guides to the adult, child, teen, and catch-up immunization schedules are now available for Palm-OS handhelds and Pocket-PCs handhelds. Both are available on the website of the Group on Immunization Education of the Society of Teachers of Family Medicine.

To access "Shots 2009" for Palm-OS handhelds and Pocket-PCs handhelds, as well as "Shots 2009 Online," go to:
http://www.immunizationed.org/anypage.aspx?pgid=2

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8 CDC offers health departments and coalitions abundant resources to plan for and promote National Infant Immunization Week

National Infant Immunization Week (NIIW) is an annual observance to highlight the importance of protecting infants from vaccine-preventable diseases. It is a call to action for parents, caregivers, and healthcare providers to ensure that infants are fully immunized against 14 vaccine-preventable diseases. This year NIIW will be held April 25-May 2 and will coincide with Vaccination Week in the Americas.

Any health department or immunization coalition interested in promoting infant immunization within their community will find abundant useful information on the CDC's NIIW website. Resources include tools for planning events and promoting them through the media; listings of NIIW activities and events planned across the nation; and education materials for providers and parents.

To access NIIW resources, go to:
http://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/events/niiw

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9 "One And Only" campaign teaches clinicians and patients that syringes should be used only once

Citing the re-use of syringes in healthcare settings other than hospitals as the cause of recent outbreaks of hepatitis B and C infections, the Safe Injection Practices Coalition recently launched the "One and Only" campaign. The campaign's slogan is "One Needle, One Syringe, and Only One Time" for each and every injection. The goal is to educate healthcare providers and patients about injection safety practices that ensure patient safety.

For information on the campaign, go to:
http://www.oneandonlycampaign.org

The Safe Injection Practices Coalition comprises CDC, patient advocacy groups, healthcare professional organizations, and industry partners.

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10.  Important: Be sure to give influenza vaccine throughout the influenza season--through the spring months

Influenza activity is increasing, and yearly vaccination is the first and most important step in protecting against influenza and its complications. It is important to continue vaccinating into the spring months. The supply of influenza vaccine is robust; if you run out of vaccine in your work setting, please place another order.

For abundant information about influenza vaccination, visit the following two websites often. They are continually updated with the latest resources:

The National Influenza Vaccine Summit website at
http://www.preventinfluenza.org

CDC's Seasonal Flu web section at http://www.cdc.gov/flu

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11.  MMWR publishes report on progress Europe made toward measles elimination during 2005-08

CDC published "Progress Toward Measles Elimination--European Region, 2005-08" in the February 20 issue of MMWR. A summary made available to the press is reprinted below in its entirety.


Despite substantial progress made toward measles elimination in the European region by 2010, achieving the elimination goal could get delayed because of the recent resurgence of measles in part of Western Europe and the presence of large susceptible adult populations in parts of Eastern Europe which creates the risk for measles outbreaks. The European Region of the World Health Organization has the goal of measles elimination by 2010. During 2007-2008, overall measles incidence in the region declined to its lowest to date (less than 10 cases per 1 million population) and coverage among children with 1 dose of measles vaccine reached a high of 94 percent. However, because of unfounded concerns about vaccine safety, measles vaccine uptake has declined in some countries, leading to recent resurgence of measles in parts of Western Europe. In addition, some Eastern European countries still have large susceptible populations among adults and are at risk of measles outbreaks. These challenges need to be urgently addressed to sustain the gains and achieve measles elimination in the European region on time.


To access a web-text (HTML) version of the article, go to:
http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/mm5806a3.htm

To access a ready-to-print (PDF) version of this issue of MMWR, go to: http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/PDF/wk/mm5806.pdf

To receive a FREE electronic subscription to MMWR (which includes new ACIP recommendations), go to:
http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/mmwrsubscribe.html

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12.  Online course on preventing meningococcal disease offers clinicians CE credit

Primarycareed.com has developed a webcast for clinicians titled "Preventing Meningococcal Disease: Defining Risk and Differentiating Serogroups." It presents information that will help clinicians identify patient groups at high risk for meningococcal infection, employ effective screening procedures, and routinely review immunization records to ensure appropriate vaccination rates.

For comprehensive information about the webcast, go to:
http://www.primarycareed.com/icme_BPE399_Meningitis_intro.htm

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13.  Key health communication lessons from the global initiative to eradicate polio will be explored at March 13 event in Washington, DC

On March 13, health communicators, practitioners, researchers, and policymakers will come together to explore the key communication lessons the global initiative to eradicate polio offers the field of health communication. The event will be held at George Washington University in Washington, DC.

For additional information and online registration, go to: http://www.comminit.com/en/node/281131 Registration is limited to 120 attendees, so be sure to register soon.

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14.  WHO's tables of immunization recommendations will aid countries in reviewing and improving immunization schedules

The January issue of WHO's Global Immunization News includes a brief article titled "WHO recommendations for routine immunization." It is reprinted below in its entirety.


To assist countries in creating 21st century immunization schedules, WHO has produced tables summarizing its current recommendations on routine immunization. This compilation of the recommendations contained in WHO position papers on vaccines provides a list of the vaccines recommended as part of the routine schedule for children, adolescents, and adults. Details on the recommended timing of routine immunization of children are also included.

Designed primarily for managers of national immunization programs, the tables and their accompanying notes are also intended as key reference material for chairs of national advisory committees on immunization and partner organizations. They are expected to serve as a driving force for the review and improvement of schedules, in keeping with the Global Immunization Vision and Strategy, which promotes immunization of all age groups.

More information:
http://www.who.int/immunization/policy/immunization_tables/en

To access the January issue of Global Immunization News, go to:
http://www.who.int/immunization/GIN_January2009.pdf

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15.  Minnesota Coalition for Adult Immunization conference scheduled for March 13 in Chaska

The Minnesota Coalition for Adult Immunization (MCAI) will present the eighteenth annual "Issues and Strategies in Adult Vaccine Preventable Diseases" on March 13 at the Minnesota Landscape Arboretum in Chaska. The registration deadline is March 6.

To access the conference brochure and register online, visit http://www.stratishealth.org and look in the section titled News & Resources in the right column.

For additional information, contact Mari Drake at maridrake@comcast.net or (651) 428-6591.

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16.  Illinois Immunization and Communicable Disease Conference and Downstate Preparedness Response Summit set for June 8-10 in Springfield

This year, the annual Illinois Immunization and Communicable Disease Conference will include the 2009 Downstate Emergency Preparedness Summit. Both will be held on June 8-10 in Springfield. CE credit is available.

For information, contact the event coordinator, Angie Wanger, at (217) 522-5687 or ipha@ipha.com

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Immunization Action Coalition  •  Saint Paul, MN
tel 651-647-9009  •  fax 651-647-9131
 
This website is supported in part by a cooperative agreement from the National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases (Grant No. 5U38IP000290) at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in Atlanta, GA. The website content is the sole responsibility of IAC and does not necessarily represent the official views of CDC.