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Immunization Action Coalition
IAC Express 2009
Issue number 779: February 9, 2009
Please click here to subscribe to IAC Express as well as other FREE IAC periodicals.
Contents of this Issue
Select a title to jump to the article.
  1. New: CDC issues recommendations for preventing rotavirus gastroenteritis among infants and children
  2. IAC's Video of the Week educates parents and students about meningococcal disease, symptoms, and prevention
  3. FDA posts a notification that Novartis requests customers to discontinue use of five lots of Fluvirin vaccine and return remaining doses
  4. IAC updates two popular vaccine administration print pieces
  5. Information about the safety of HPV vaccine is available to healthcare professionals and the public on CDC's website
  6. Important: Be sure to give influenza vaccine throughout the influenza season--through spring 2009
  7. CDC posts a Q&A to answer parents' questions during current shortage of monovalent measles, mumps, and rubella vaccines
  8. The "CDC Features" web section presents basic rubella information for the public
  9. Institute of Medicine's Committee on Prevention and Control of Viral Hepatitis Infections plans public meeting for March 3
 
Abbreviations
AAFP, American Academy of Family Physicians; AAP, American Academy of Pediatrics; ACIP, Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices; AMA, American Medical Association; CDC, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention; FDA, Food and Drug Administration; IAC, Immunization Action Coalition; MMWR, Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report; NCIRD, National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases; NIVS, National Influenza Vaccine Summit; VIS, Vaccine Information Statement; VPD, vaccine-preventable disease; WHO, World Health Organization.
  
Issue 779: February 9, 2009
1.  New: CDC issues recommendations for preventing rotavirus gastroenteritis among infants and children

 

CDC published "Prevention of Rotavirus Gastroenteritis Among Infants and Children: Recommendations of the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP)" on February 6 in MMWR Recommendations and Reports. The summary is reprinted below.


Rotavirus is the most common cause of severe gastroenteritis in infants and young children worldwide. Before initiation of the rotavirus vaccination program in the United States in 2006, approximately 80% of U.S. children had rotavirus gastroenteritis by age 5 years. Each year during the 1990s and early 2000s, rotavirus resulted in approximately 410,000 physician visits, 205,000-272,000 emergency department visits, and 55,000-70,000 hospitalizations among U.S. infants and children, with total annual direct and indirect costs of approximately $1 billion. In February 2006, a live, oral, human-bovine reassortant rotavirus vaccine (RotaTeq [RV5]) was licensed as a 3-dose series for use among U.S. infants for the prevention of rotavirus gastroenteritis, and the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) recommended routine use of RV5 among U.S. infants (CDC. Prevention of rotavirus gastroenteritis among infants and children: recommendations of the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices [ACIP]. MMWR 2006;55[No. RR-12]). In April 2008, a live, oral, human attenuated rotavirus vaccine (Rotarix [RV1]) was licensed as a 2-dose series for use among U.S. infants, and in June 2008, ACIP updated its rotavirus vaccine recommendations to include use of RV1. This report updates and replaces the 2006 ACIP statement for prevention of rotavirus gastroenteritis. ACIP recommends routine vaccination of U.S. infants with rotavirus vaccine. RV5 and RV1 differ in composition and schedule of administration. RV5 is to be administered orally in a 3-dose series, with doses administered at ages 2, 4, and 6 months. RV1 is to be administered orally in a 2-dose series, with doses administered at ages 2 and 4 months. ACIP does not express a preference for either RV5 or RV1. The recommendations in this report also address the maximum ages for doses, contraindications, precautions, and special situations for the administration of rotavirus vaccine.


To access a ready-to-print (PDF) version of this issue of the recommendations, go to:
http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/PDF/rr/rr5802.pdf

To access a web-text (HTML) version of the recommendations, go to: http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/rr5802a1.htm

To receive a FREE electronic subscription to MMWR (which includes new ACIP recommendations), go to:
http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/mmwrsubscribe.html

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2 IAC's Video of the Week educates parents and students about meningococcal disease, symptoms, and prevention

 

IAC encourages IAC Express readers to watch a powerful 25-minute video about meningococcal disease. Narrated by actress Glenn Close, "Getting It--A Disease, a Vaccine," features stories about meningococcal disease survivors and families affected by the disease. The video was developed by the National Meningitis Association (NMA). A one-minute preview clip is also available.

The video and clip will be available on the home page of IAC's website through February 15. To access them, go to: http://www.immunize.org and click on the image under the words Video of the Week, which you'll find toward the top of the page. It may take a few moments for the video or clip to begin playing; please be patient!

Remember to bookmark IAC's home page to view a new video every Monday. While you're at our home page, we encourage you to browse around--you're sure to find resources and information that will enhance your practice's immunization delivery.

To view IAC's video collection, go to:
http://www.vaccineinformation.org/video

To access material related to the video and clip on the NMA website, go to:
http://www.nmaus.org/programs/education_initiative

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3 FDA posts a notification that Novartis requests customers to discontinue use of five lots of Fluvirin vaccine and return remaining doses

 

On February 4, FDA posted a notification that Novartis Vaccines and Diagnostics Limited has requested customers to discontinue use of five lots of Fluvirin trivalent inactivated influenza vaccine and to return remaining doses. The notification is reprinted below in its entirety.


FLUVIRIN (Influenza Virus Vaccine) Luer-Lok pre-filled syringes

DATE NOTIFICATION INITIATED: February 4, 2009

LOT NUMBER/EXPIRATION DATE:
Lot Number   Expiration Date
878771P   05/2009
878772P   05/2009
878773P   05/2009
878775P   05/2009
878776P   05/2009

MANUFACTURER:
Novartis Vaccines and Diagnostics Limited
Liverpool, United Kingdom

REASON:
Novartis Vaccines and Diagnostics Inc. has requested their customers to immediately discontinue use of and return any remaining doses they may have from five lots of FLUVIRIN Influenza vaccine Luer-Lok pre-filled syringes.

Routine stability testing of FLUVIRIN in prefilled Luer-Lok syringes revealed a minor deviation in the potency of the A/Brisbane (H1N1) component of the vaccine. The vaccine met all required specifications at the time of release and has been monitored in monthly time intervals during its shelf life; it has consistently met specification until the most recent test point in early January 2009 that identified a minimal decrease in H1N1 antigen content.

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA), the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), and Novartis Vaccines have agreed that no public health impact is expected because (1) all of the affected vaccine was shipped when the vaccine met potency requirements, (2) most influenza vaccine in the U.S. is administered during October and November, months when the vaccine met potency requirements, and (3) the decrease in antigen content is small and would have a negligible if any effect on immune response to vaccination. Revaccination of patients that have been vaccinated with the affected lots is not necessary.

To access the notification from the FDA website, go to:
http://www.fda.gov/cber/recalls/novflu020409.htm

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4 IAC updates two popular vaccine administration print pieces

 

IAC recently updated its information sheet "How to Administer IM and SC Injections to Adults" and its reference table "Administering Vaccines: Dose, Route, Site, and Needle Size." On "How to Administer IM and SC Injections to Adults," information in the sections on needle length and combination vaccines was revised. On "Administering Vaccines: Dose, Route, Site, and Needle Size," a note was added about needle length. Other minor revisions were made to both pieces.

To access the revised "How to Administer IM and SC Injections to Adults," go to: http://www.immunize.org/catg.d/p2020a.pdf

To access the revised "Administering Vaccines: Dose, Route, Site, and Needle Size," go to:
http://www.immunize.org/catg.d/p3085.pdf

IAC's Print Materials web section offers healthcare professionals and the public approximately 250 FREE English-language materials (many also available in translation), which we encourage website users to print out, copy, and distribute widely. To access all of IAC's free print materials, go to: http://www.immunize.org/printmaterials

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5 Information about the safety of HPV vaccine is available to healthcare professionals and the public on CDC's website

On February 6, CBS Evening News aired a story on the safety of human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine. Healthcare providers may receive inquiries as a result. CDC offers providers and the general public several online resources about the HPV vaccine and the safety studies conducted on it. To access these resources, go to: http://www.cdc.gov/vaccinesafety/concerns/human_papillomavirus_vaccine.htm

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6 Important: Be sure to give influenza vaccine throughout the influenza season--through spring 2009

 

Influenza activity is increasing, and yearly vaccination is the first and most important step in protecting against influenza and its complications. It is important to continue vaccinating into the spring months. The supply of influenza vaccine is robust; if you run out of vaccine in your work setting, please place another order.

For abundant information about influenza vaccination, visit the following two websites often. They are continually updated with the latest resources:

The National Influenza Vaccine Summit website at
http://www.preventinfluenza.org

CDC's Seasonal Flu web section at http://www.cdc.gov/flu

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7 CDC posts a Q&A to answer parents' questions during current shortage of monovalent measles, mumps, and rubella vaccines

 

Healthcare providers who see the parents of young children will appreciate the information contained in a Q&A posted on the CDC website on February 4. Titled "Q&A about Monovalent M-M-R Vaccine During Supply Shortages," the document answers questions parents might have during the current shortage of single-antigen measles, mumps, and rubella vaccines. The shortage was announced on December 15, 2008.

To access the Q&A, go to:
http://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/vac-gen/shortages/mmr-faq-12-17-08.htm

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8 The "CDC Features" web section presents basic rubella information for the public

 

The CDC web section titled "CDC Features" recently posted information about rubella for the public. Titled "Rubella: Make Sure Your Child Is Fully Immunized," it covers rubella symptoms, possible health consequences of getting the disease, and the importance of MMR vaccination. It also presents links to additional sources of online information.

To access this feature, go to:
http://www.cdc.gov/Features/Rubella

To access an alphabetical index of archived "CDC Features," go to: http://www.cdc.gov/Features

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9 Institute of Medicine's Committee on Prevention and Control of Viral Hepatitis Infections plans public meeting for March 3

The Institute of Medicine's Committee on Prevention and Control of Viral Hepatitis Infections will hold a public meeting on March 3. For details, directions, and online registration, go to: http://iom.edu/CMS/3793/59310/61701.aspx

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This website is supported in part by a cooperative agreement from the National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases (Grant No. 5U38IP000290) at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in Atlanta, GA. The website content is the sole responsibility of IAC and does not necessarily represent the official views of CDC.