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Immunization Action Coalition
IAC Express 2009
Issue number 775: January 20, 2009
Please click here to subscribe to IAC Express as well as other FREE IAC periodicals.
Contents of this Issue
Select a title to jump to the article.
  1. Be sure to read New York Times article on Dr. Paul Offit's new book, Autism's False Prophets
  2. The "CDC Features" web section presents basic pertussis information for the public
  3. MMWR publishes update on pneumonia hospitalizations among young U.S. children before and after PCV7 was introduced
  4. Important: Be sure to give influenza vaccine throughout the influenza season--through spring 2009
  5. Childhood Influenza Immunization Coalition offers educational materials in Spanish and five Asian languages
  6. HHS awards a $487 million contract to build facility to manufacture cell-based influenza vaccine
  7. WHO announces that major updates made to its Immunization Financing web section during 2008 are now live
  8. Erratum: MMWR corrects a footnote in its October 10, 2008, article on adolescent vaccination coverage
  9. HHS releases the sixth Pandemic Planning Update
 
Abbreviations
AAFP, American Academy of Family Physicians; AAP, American Academy of Pediatrics; ACIP, Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices; AMA, American Medical Association; CDC, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention; FDA, Food and Drug Administration; IAC, Immunization Action Coalition; MMWR, Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report; NCIRD, National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases; NIVS, National Influenza Vaccine Summit; VIS, Vaccine Information Statement; VPD, vaccine-preventable disease; WHO, World Health Organization.
  
Issue 775: January 20, 2009
1.  Be sure to read New York Times article on Dr. Paul Offit's new book, Autism's False Prophets

On January 12, the New York Times published an article titled
"Book Is Rallying Resistance to the Antivaccine Crusade."
Written by science and health reporter Donald G. McNeil Jr., the
article contains interviews with respected public health,
vaccine, and autism professionals commenting on the vaccine-
autism controversy and Dr. Offit's most recent book, "Autism's
False Prophets: Bad science, risky medicine, and the search for
a cure."

The Times article is available online at
http://www.nytimes.com/2009/01/13/health/13auti.html?scp=7&sq=january+13+2009&st=nyt
If you are not registered to access the
Times online, you may need to register; there is no charge to do
so.

Dr. Offit is the chief of Infectious Diseases and the director
of the Vaccine Education Center at the Children's Hospital of
Philadelphia, as well as the Maurice R. Hilleman Professor of
Vaccinology and professor of pediatrics at the University of
Pennsylvania School of Medicine. "Autism's False Prophets" was
published in September 2008 by Columbia University Press. For
information about it, including a video of Dr. Offit, go to:
http://cup.columbia.edu/book/978-0-231-14636-4/autisms-false-prophets/webFeatures

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2 The "CDC Features" web section presents basic pertussis information for the public

The CDC web section titled "CDC Features" recently posted
information about pertussis for the public. Titled "Pertussis
(Whooping Cough)--What You Need To Know," it covers symptoms,
transmission, and prevention; it also presents links to
additional sources of online information.

To access this feature, go to:
http://www.cdc.gov/Features/Pertussis

To access an alphabetical index of archived CDC Features, go to:
http://www.cdc.gov/Features

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3 MMWR publishes update on pneumonia hospitalizations among young U.S. children before and after PCV7 was introduced

CDC published "Pneumonia Hospitalization Among Young Children Before and After Introduction of Pneumococcal Conjugate Vaccine--United States, 1997-2006" in the January 16 issue of MMWR. Portions of the article are reprinted below.


Streptococcus pneumoniae is the leading bacterial cause of community-acquired pneumonia hospitalizations and an important cause of bacteremia and meningitis, especially among young children and older adults. A 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV7) was licensed and the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices formulated recommendations for its use in infants and children in February 2000. Vaccination coverage rapidly increased during the second half of 2000, in part through funding by CDC's Vaccines for Children program. Subsequently, active population- and laboratory-based surveillance demonstrated substantial reductions in invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) among children and adults. In addition, decreases in hospitalizations and ambulatory-care visits for all-cause pneumonia also were reported. To gauge whether the effects of PCV7 on reducing pneumonia continue, CDC is monitoring pneumonia hospitalizations by using data from the Nationwide Inpatient Sample. This report provides an update for 2005 and 2006, the most recent years for which information is available. In 2005 and 2006, the incidence rates for all-cause pneumonia hospitalizations among children aged <2 years were 9.1 per 1,000 and 8.1 per 1,000, respectively. In 2006, the rate for all-cause pneumonia among children aged <2 years was approximately 35% lower than during 1997-1999. Most of this decrease occurred soon after the vaccine was licensed in 2000, and the rates have remained relatively stable since then. The rate for all-cause pneumonia among children aged 2-4 years did not change after PCV7 licensure and has remained stable. Continued monitoring of pneumonia-related hospitalizations among children is needed to track the effects of pneumococcal immunization programs. . . .


To access a web-text (HTML) version of the complete article, go to: http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/mm5801a1.htm

To access a ready-to-print (PDF) version of this issue of MMWR, go to: http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/PDF/wk/mm5801.pdf

To receive a FREE electronic subscription to MMWR (which includes new ACIP recommendations), go to:
http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/mmwrsubscribe.html

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4 Important: Be sure to give influenza vaccine throughout the influenza season--through spring 2009

Influenza activity is increasing, and yearly vaccination is the first and most important step in protecting against influenza and its complications. It is important to continue vaccinating into the spring months. The supply of influenza vaccine is robust; if you run out of vaccine in your work setting, please place another order.

For abundant information about influenza vaccination, visit the following two websites often. They are continually updated with the latest resources:

The National Influenza Vaccine Summit website at
http://www.preventinfluenza.org

CDC's Seasonal Flu web section at http://www.cdc.gov/flu

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5 Childhood Influenza Immunization Coalition offers educational materials in Spanish and five Asian languages

The Childhood Influenza Immunization Coalition recently announced that its website now has childhood influenza education materials available in Spanish, Chinese (Mandarin), Japanese, Korean, Tagalog, and Vietnamese. Patient fact sheets and waiting room posters are available in all languages; healthcare professional fact sheets, FAQs, print public service announcements, and more are available in Spanish.

To access the materials, go to:
http://www.preventchildhoodinfluenza.org/healthcare/multilingual_materials.php

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6 HHS awards a $487 million contract to build facility to manufacture cell-based influenza vaccine

On January 15, the Department of Health and Human Services issued a press release announcing that it has awarded a $487 million contract to Novartis Vaccines and Diagnostics, Inc., to build the first U.S. facility to manufacture cell-based influenza vaccine. Portions of the press release are reprinted below.


The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) today announced a $487 million multiple year contract with Novartis Vaccines and Diagnostics, Inc., to build the first U.S. facility to manufacture cell-based vaccine for seasonal and pandemic flu. Because cell-based influenza vaccine can be made faster and in greater quantities than traditional vaccine, the new facility is expected to increase the U.S. capacity to make pandemic influenza vaccine by at least 25 percent.

Cell-based vaccine production could more easily meet surge capacity needs because cells could be frozen and stored in advance of an epidemic or developed rapidly in response to an epidemic. Cell-based vaccine production also dramatically reduces the possibility for contamination and promises to be more reliable, flexible, and expandable than egg-based methods. . . .

To access the complete press release, go to:
http://www.hhs.gov/news/press/2009pres/01/20090115b.html

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7 WHO announces that major updates made to its Immunization Financing web section during 2008 are now live

WHO recently announced that updates and developments made to its Immunization Financing web section in 2008 are now live. To access them, go to: http://www.who.int/immunization_financing/en

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8 Erratum: MMWR corrects a footnote in its October 10, 2008, article on adolescent vaccination coverage

CDC published "Erratum: Vol. 57, No. 40" in the January 16 issue of MMWR. It concerns an error that appeared in "Vaccination Coverage Among Adolescents Aged 13-17 Years--United States, 2007," which was published in MMWR on October 10, 2008. The correction is reprinted below in its entirety.


In the report, "Vaccination Coverage Among Adolescents Aged 13-17 Years--United States, 2007," on page 1100, in the second footnote, an error occurred. The first sentence of the footnote should read as follows:

"[dagger] NIS-Teen 2007 was conducted during the fourth quarter 2007 only; eligible participants were born during October 5, 1989-February 14, 1995."


To access a web-text (HTML) version of the erratum, go to:
http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/mm5801a4.htm

To access a ready-to-print (PDF) version of this issue of MMWR, go to: http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/PDF/wk/mm5801.pdf

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9 HHS releases the sixth Pandemic Planning Update

On January 8, Michael Leavitt, Secretary of HHS (Department of Health and Human Services), released a report titled "Pandemic Planning Update VI." It provides recent information on the department's priorities related to pandemic planning, which were outlined in the original report, "Pandemic Planning Update," dated March 13, 2006.

To access the sixth update, go to:
http://www.pandemicflu.gov/plan/pdf/panflureport6.pdf

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This website is supported in part by a cooperative agreement from the National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases (Grant No. 5U38IP000290) at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in Atlanta, GA. The website content is the sole responsibility of IAC and does not necessarily represent the official views of CDC.