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Immunization Action Coalition
IAC Express 2008
Issue number 766: November 24, 2008
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Contents of this Issue
Select a title to jump to the article.
  1. New VIS: CDC issues an interim VIS to be used for both Td vaccine and Tdap vaccine
  2. New: IAC patient-education piece makes the case for getting the whole family vaccinated against influenza every year
  3. Nineteen medical societies support a statement affirming the importance of adult vaccination
  4. New: This year, National Influenza Vaccination Week focuses on vaccinating three significant populations: children, seniors, and healthcare personnel
  5. Reminder: CDC's December 12 net conference to focus on influenza vaccination of healthcare personnel
  6. Important: Be sure to give influenza vaccine throughout the influenza season--through spring 2009
  7. VIS translations: Current VISs for injectable and nasal-spray influenza vaccines now in Arabic, Cambodian, and Korean
  8. MMWR publishes article on worldwide implementation of newborn hepatitis B vaccination during 2006
  9. CDC reports on importance of Hib surveillance during the current Hib vaccine shortage
  10. CDC issues guidance for testing people with suspected avian influenza virus and for following up on their contacts
  11. MMWR publishes article on worldwide rotavirus surveillance during 2001-08
  12. CDC and Emory University schedule a series of epidemiology courses for 2009
 
Abbreviations
AAFP, American Academy of Family Physicians; AAP, American Academy of Pediatrics; ACIP, Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices; AMA, American Medical Association; CDC, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention; FDA, Food and Drug Administration; IAC, Immunization Action Coalition; MMWR, Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report; NCIRD, National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases; NIVS, National Influenza Vaccine Summit; VIS, Vaccine Information Statement; VPD, vaccine-preventable disease; WHO, World Health Organization.
  
Issue 766: November 24, 2008
1.  New VIS: CDC issues an interim VIS to be used for both Td vaccine and Tdap vaccine

On November 18, CDC issued a new interim VIS to be used when administering either Td or Tdap vaccine. The new interim VIS replaces the VIS for Td vaccine (dated 6/10/94) and the VIS for Tdap vaccine (dated 7/12/06). Providers may use up stocks of the two older VISs.

To access the 11/18/08 interim VIS for Td and Tdap vaccines from the IAC website, go to: http://www.immunize.org/vis/td_tdap.pdf

For information about the use of VISs, and for VISs in more than 35 languages, visit IAC's VIS web section at http://www.immunize.org/vis

For general information about VISs from CDC's website go to: http://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/pubs/vis

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2 New: IAC patient-education piece makes the case for getting the whole family vaccinated against influenza every year

With annual influenza vaccination recommended for about 85 percent of the U.S. population, chances are every patient a clinician sees has at least one family member for whom influenza vaccination is recommended. With that in mind, IAC has developed a new one-page print resource titled "Don't take chances with your family's health--make sure you all get vaccinated against influenza every year!"

The piece explains how easy it is to become infected with and to transmit influenza and outlines the range of health consequences the disease can have on the individual and family. The intention is to influence at least one person in each family to see to it that all family members--children, parents, and grandparents--get vaccinated every year.

To access the new piece, go to:
http://www.immunize.org/catg.d/p4069.pdf

IAC's Print Materials web section offers healthcare professionals and the public approximately 250 FREE English-language materials (many also available in translation), which we encourage website users to print out, copy, and distribute widely. To access all of IAC's free print materials, go to: http://www.immunize.org/printmaterials

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3 Nineteen medical societies support a statement affirming the importance of adult vaccination

On November 19, the American College of Physicians (ACP) and the Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA) announced that they released a joint statement on the importance of adult vaccination against an increasing number of vaccine-preventable diseases. The statement has been endorsed by 17 other medical societies representing a range of practice areas. The statement is reprinted below in its entirety, excluding references and information on the endorsing medical societies. Also on November 19, ACP and ISDA issued a related press release; a link to it is given at the end of this IAC Express article.


Joint Statement of Medical Societies Regarding Vaccination by Physicians

Summary:
In an effort to emphasize the importance of adult vaccination against an increasing number of vaccine-preventable diseases, primary care and many subspecialty physicians should take an active role in the discussion and review of their adult patients' vaccination status and in the administration of recommended vaccines. Increased consumer demand for quality care, and guidelines and/or recommendations from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and other professional societies provide additional impetus for a renewed and stronger emphasis on provision of vaccines.

The Potential Role of Subspecialists:
Primary care is the most convenient and appropriate setting for delivery of vaccines to most adult patients, since it serves as their "medical home." However, many patients with chronic disease also have a "medical home" with a subspecialist. For example, infectious disease physicians often provide primary and preventive care services for patients with HIV infection. Other subspecialists also may serve as the preferred source of care for their patients with chronic disease, providing an opportunity to serve as a source of vaccination administration or referral.

It is proposed that
(1) Primary and subspecialty physicians should conduct immunization review at appropriate adult medical visits to educate patients about the benefits of vaccination and to assess whether the patient's vaccination status is current, referring to the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices Adult Immunization Schedule.

(2) When appropriate, physicians should provide or refer patients for recommended immunizations.

(3) Physicians who administer vaccines should ensure appropriate documentation in the medical record. In addition, documentation of vaccination in other settings, patient refusal, and any contraindications is advisable. The use of immunization registries and electronic data systems facilitates access to accurate and complete immunization data.

(4) Physicians who refer patients for vaccination also should review and document the vaccination status of their patients whenever possible.

(5) Consistent with the CDC Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices and multiple subspecialty organizations, physicians and their staff should be immunized consistent with CDC recommendations, with particular attention to annual influenza immunization. . . .


To access the complete joint statement, click here.

To access the related press release, go to:
http://www.idsociety.org/Content.aspx?id=12370

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4 New: This year, National Influenza Vaccination Week focuses on vaccinating three significant populations: children, seniors, and healthcare personnel

Scheduled for December 8-14, this year's National Influenza Vaccination Week (NIVW) emphasizes the importance of vaccinating children, seniors, and healthcare personnel by setting aside a day for each group. Tuesday, December 9, is Children's Vaccination Day; Thursday, December 11, is Seniors' Vaccination Day; and Friday, December 12, is Healthcare Worker Vaccination Day. Links to materials for NIVW in general and to materials pertinent to children, seniors, and healthcare personnel are listed below.

NATIONAL INFLUENZA VACCINATION WEEK
To access resources pertinent to NIVW, go to:
http://www.cdc.gov/flu/nivw

CHILDREN'S VACCINATION DAY
To access an English-language poster, go to:
http://www.cdc.gov/flu/professionals/flugallery/2008-09/fluvac_kids.htm

To access a Spanish-language poster, go to:
http://www.cdc.gov/flu/professionals/flugallery/2008-09/fluvac_kids_sp.htm

To access a video narrated by parents who have lost a child to
influenza, go to:
http://www.cdc.gov/flu/professionals/flugallery/2008-09/vaccination_video.htm

SENIORS' VACCINATION DAY
To access posters intended for African-American and Hispanic seniors, who have lower reported influenza vaccination rates than their Caucasian peers, go to:
http://www.cdc.gov/flu/professionals/flugallery

HEALTHCARE WORKER VACCINATION DAY
To access a poster that focuses on nurses and allied healthcare personnel, go to:
http://www.cdc.gov/flu/professionals/flugallery/2008-09/p_healthcare_provide.htm

To access numerous print materials, public service announcements, e-cards, web badges and buttons, and ready-to-use articles for the media, go to:
http://www.cdc.gov/flu/professionals/flugallery

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5 Reminder: CDC's December 12 net conference to focus on influenza vaccination of healthcare personnel

The next "Current Issues in Immunization" net conference will be held on December 12 from 2PM to 3PM ET. This coincides with the 2008 observation of National Influenza Vaccination Week, which is scheduled for December 8-14.

Andrew T. Kroger, MD, MPH, will speak on influenza vaccination of healthcare personnel, and Alan Janssen, MSPH, will present case studies about influenza vaccination of healthcare personnel.

Registration is limited and will close on December 10 or when the course is full. To register, go to:
http://www2.cdc.gov/vaccines/ed/ciinc

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6 Important: Be sure to give influenza vaccine throughout the influenza season--through spring 2009

Influenza vaccine for the 2008-09 influenza season is available. Vaccination should continue through the spring months of 2009. Visit the following websites often to find the information you need to keep vaccinating. Both are continually updated with the latest resources.

The National Influenza Vaccine Summit website at
http://www.preventinfluenza.org

CDC's Seasonal Flu web section at http://www.cdc.gov/flu

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7 VIS translations: Current VISs for injectable and nasal-spray influenza vaccines now in Arabic, Cambodian, and Korean

The current (7/24/08) VISs for trivalent influenza vaccine (TIV; injectable) and for live attenuated influenza vaccine (LAIV; nasal spray) are now available in Arabic, Cambodian, and Korean. IAC gratefully acknowledges the California Department of Public Health, Immunization Branch, for the translations.

VIS for TIV
To access the Arabic version of the VIS for TIV, go to:
http://www.immunize.org/vis/ab_flu06.pdf

To access the Cambodian version of the VIS for TIV, go to:
http://www.immunize.org/vis/ca_flu04.pdf

To access the Korean version of the VIS for TIV, go to:
http://www.immunize.org/vis/ko_flu06.pdf

To access the English version of the VIS for TIV, go to:
http://www.immunize.org/vis/2flu.pdf

NOTE: The VIS for TIV comes in additional languages, including Spanish. To access them, go to: http://www.immunize.org/vis/vis_flu_inactive.asp Click on the link to the pertinent language.

VIS for LAIV
To access the Arabic version of the VIS for LAIV, go to:
http://www.immunize.org/vis/abLAIV06.pdf

To access the Cambodian version of the VIS for LAIV, go to:
http://www.immunize.org/vis/caLAIV04.pdf

To access the Korean version of the VIS for LAIV, go to:
http://www.immunize.org/vis/koLAIV06.pdf

To access the English version of the VIS for LAIV, go to:
http://www.immunize.org/vis/liveflu.pdf

NOTE: The VIS for LAIV comes in additional languages, including Spanish. To access them, go to: http://www.immunize.org/vis/vis_flu_live.asp Click on the link to the pertinent language.

For information about the use of VISs, and for VISs in more than 35 languages, visit IAC's VIS web section at http://www.immunize.org/vis

For general information about VISs from CDC's website go to: http://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/pubs/vis

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8 MMWR publishes article on worldwide implementation of newborn hepatitis B vaccination during 2006

CDC published "Implementation of Newborn Hepatitis B Vaccination--Worldwide, 2006" in the November 21 issue of MMWR. A summary made available to the press is reprinted below in its entirety.


An analysis of data collected by the World Health Organization (WHO) and United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF) indicates low worldwide coverage of hepatitis B (HepB) vaccination of infants at birth. Only 27 percent of infants born worldwide and 36 percent of infants born in countries with high rates of chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection received HepB vaccination within 24 hours of birth. WHO recommends HepB vaccination of newborns in countries with high rates of chronic hepatitis B, since vaccination within 24 hours of birth is up to 95 percent effective in preventing mother-to-child HBV transmission. Globally, hepatitis B is a major cause of cirrhosis and liver cancer and is estimated to cause 620,000 deaths each year. Infants who become HBV-infected have a 90 percent risk of developing chronic infection and a 25 percent risk of dying from the disease. Low worldwide coverage of the HepB vaccine at birth represents significant missed opportunities. More complete implementation of routine newborn HepB vaccination globally would help prevent the substantial morbidity and mortality caused by perinatally-acquired HBV infection.


To access a web-text (HTML) version of the complete article, go to: http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/mm5746a1.htm

To access a ready-to-print (PDF) version of this issue of MMWR, go to: http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/PDF/wk/mm5746.pdf

To receive a FREE electronic subscription to MMWR (which includes new ACIP recommendations), go to:
http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/mmwrsubscribe.html

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9 CDC reports on importance of Hib surveillance during the current Hib vaccine shortage

CDC published "Continued Shortage of Haemophilus influenzae Type b (Hib) Conjugate Vaccines and Potential Implications for Hib Surveillance--United States, 2008" in the November 21 issue of MMWR. A summary made available to the press is reprinted below in its entirety.


Health departments, state and hospital laboratories, and physicians should increase efforts for timely serotyping and reporting of all cases of invasive H. influenzae disease in children aged <5 years.

In October 2008 Merck & Co., Inc. announced that their supply outage of Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) conjugate vaccines (PedvaxHIB and Comvax) would continue until mid-2009. As this ongoing outage has disrupted the United States supply of Hib vaccines, national surveillance for invasive Hib disease in children <5 years of age is of particular importance. Unfortunately, national Hib surveillance is hampered by incomplete serotype reporting. For children aged <5 years, serotype are missing for nearly 40 percent of H. influenzae cases reported to CDC. The extended vaccine shortage heightens the need for timely reporting and investigation of all H. influenzae cases, and accurate serotyping of all invasive H. influenzae isolates in children aged <5 years.


To access a web-text (HTML) version of the complete article, go to: http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/mm5746a2.htm

To access a ready-to-print (PDF) version of this issue of MMWR, go to: http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/PDF/wk/mm5746.pdf

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10.  CDC issues guidance for testing people with suspected avian influenza virus and for following up on their contacts

CDC recently added the following two guidance documents to its avian influenza web section:

"Guidance Document: Interim Guidance for Laboratory Testing of Persons with Suspected Infection with Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza A (H5N1) Virus in the United States"

To access the document, go to:
http://www.cdc.gov/flu/avian/professional/guidance-labtesting.htm

"Guidance Document: Interim Guidance for Follow-up of Contacts of Persons with Suspected Infection with Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza A (H5N1) Virus in the United States"

To access the document, go to:
http://www.cdc.gov/flu/avian/professional/guidance-followup.htm

To access a broad range of continually updated information on seasonal influenza, avian influenza, pandemic influenza, swine influenza, and canine influenza, go to: http://www.cdc.gov/flu

The National Influenza Vaccine Summit's website also contains extensive information and resources on influenza. Visit www.preventinfluenza.org often.

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11.  MMWR publishes article on worldwide rotavirus surveillance during 2001-08

CDC published "Rotavirus Surveillance--Worldwide, 2001-08" in the November 21 issue of MMWR. A summary made available to the press is reprinted below in its entirety.


Rotavirus is the leading cause of severe diarrhea in young children worldwide, accounting for approximately 40 percent of hospitalizations for this disease. The large health burden underscores the potential health benefits of new vaccines against rotavirus. The availability and use of rotavirus vaccines globally can have a substantial impact in reducing hospitalizations and the estimated >500,000 annual deaths from rotavirus diarrhea, thereby contributing to the achievement of the United Nations' Millennium Development Goals for reduction of childhood mortality. Approximately 40 percent of diarrhea hospitalizations among children aged <5 years worldwide were attributed to rotavirus infection according to surveillance conducted during 2001-2008 at sentinel hospitals in 35 countries in each of the 6 regions of the World Health Organization. This percentage is greater than that previously reported. The large health burden of rotavirus diarrhea underscores the need for effective vaccines for the control of this disease, as part of a comprehensive approach for prevention and control of diarrhea.


To access a web-text (HTML) version of the complete article, go to: http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/mm5746a3.htm

To access a ready-to-print (PDF) version of this issue of MMWR, go to: http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/PDF/wk/mm5746.pdf

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12.  CDC and Emory University schedule a series of epidemiology courses for 2009

CDC and the Rollins School of Public Health at Emory University recently announced a schedule of epidemiology courses for 2009. Courses are offered in applied epidemiology, public health surveillance, and public health software.

For comprehensive information, go to:
http://www.sph.emory.edu/EPICOURSES

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This website is supported in part by a cooperative agreement from the National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases (Grant No. 5U38IP000290) at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in Atlanta, GA. The website content is the sole responsibility of IAC and does not necessarily represent the official views of CDC.