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Immunization Action Coalition
IAC Express 2008
Issue number 762: November 10, 2008
 
Contents of this Issue
Select a title to jump to the article.
  1. IAC revises its parent-education piece "Reliable Sources of Immunization Information: Where to go to find answers!"
  2. CDC reports approximately 25,000 HPV-associated cancer cases occurred annually during 1998-2003
  3. Important: Be sure to give influenza vaccine throughout the influenza season--through spring 2009
  4. CDC's Seasonal Flu web section updates its information about antivirals, National Influenza Vaccination Week, and more
  5. Save the date: CDC's December 12 net conference to focus on influenza vaccination of healthcare personnel
 
Abbreviations
AAFP, American Academy of Family Physicians; AAP, American Academy of Pediatrics; ACIP, Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices; AMA, American Medical Association; CDC, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention; FDA, Food and Drug Administration; IAC, Immunization Action Coalition; MMWR, Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report; NCIRD, National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases; NIVS, National Influenza Vaccine Summit; VIS, Vaccine Information Statement; VPD, vaccine-preventable disease; WHO, World Health Organization.
  
Issue 762: November 10, 2008
1.  IAC revises its parent-education piece "Reliable Sources of Immunization Information: Where to go to find answers!"

"Reliable Sources of Immunization Information: Where to go to find answers!" gives healthcare professionals an easy way to direct parents to trustworthy sources of science-based immunization information. IAC has updated the piece with information on two recently published books and a newly launched website.

To access the updated piece, go to:
http://www.immunize.org/catg.d/p4012.pdf

IAC's Print Materials web section offers healthcare professionals and the public approximately 250 FREE, English-language materials (many also available in translation), which we encourage website users to print out, copy, and distribute widely. To access all of IAC's free print materials, go to:
http://www.immunize.org/printmaterials

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2 CDC reports approximately 25,000 HPV-associated cancer cases occurred annually during 1998-2003

On November 3, CDC issued a press release titled "CDC Releases First Estimate of Human Papillomavirus-Associated Cancer Data: About 25,000 cases occurred annually during 1998-2003." Portions of the press release are reprinted below.


Twenty-five thousand cases of human papillomavirus (HPV)-associated cancers occurred in 38 states and the District of Columbia annually during 1998-2003, according to studies conducted by CDC. The report, "Assessing the Burden of Human Papillomavirus (HPV)-Associated Cancers in the United States (ABHACUS)," was published online and appears in the Nov. 15, 2008, supplement edition of Cancer.

"These estimates of HPV-associated cancers were collected prior to the development of the HPV vaccine. This gives us baseline data to measure the impact of HPV vaccine and cervical cancer screening programs in reducing the incidence of cervical cancer and other HPV-associated cancers and precancers," said Mona Saraiya, MD, MPH, medical officer in CDC's Division of Cancer Prevention and Control and coordinator of the studies.

This first analysis of the largest, most comprehensive assessment of HPV-associated cancer data to date in the United States used cancer registry data from CDC's National Program of Cancer Registries and the National Cancer Institute's Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results Program.

The top HPV-associated cancer sites were cervix, oral cavity and oropharynx, anus, vulva, penis, and vagina. HPV is the name of a group of viruses that includes more than 100 different types. More than 30 of these HPV types can be sexually transmitted. Most people with HPV infection do not develop symptoms or health problems. Some HPV types can cause cervical cancer and other less common cancers, such as cancer of the vulva, vagina, anus, and penis. Other HPV types can cause genital warts. . . .

The Cancer supplement chapters also focus on disparities of HPV-associated cancers, how CDC and state and local programs address such disparities, background of the HPV vaccine, the economic impact of HPV-associated cancer mortality, the burden of cervical cancers in specific states with a high burden of disease, and surveillance of behavioral risk factors related to these cancers. These studies were conducted by scientists at CDC and several researchers at other organizations including the National Cancer Institute, the American Cancer Society, state cancer registry staff, and academic institutions.

For the online article, go to http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/journal/121498429/issue For information on gynecologic cancers please visit www.cdc.gov/cancer/gynecologic For information on cervical cancer screening for low-income, uninsured, and underinsured women, please visit http://www.cdc.gov/cancer/nbccedp For information on how men are affected by HPV-associated cancer, please visit http://www.cdc.gov/std/hpv/stdfact-hpv-and-men.htm

To access the complete press release, go to:
http://www.cdc.gov/media/pressrel/2008/r081103.htm

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3 Important: Be sure to give influenza vaccine throughout the influenza season--through spring 2009

Influenza vaccine for the 2008-09 influenza season is available. Vaccination should continue through the spring months of 2009. Visit the following websites often to find the information you need to keep vaccinating. Both are continually updated with the latest resources.

The National Influenza Vaccine Summit website at
http://www.preventinfluenza.org

CDC's Seasonal Flu web section at http://www.cdc.gov/flu

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4 CDC's Seasonal Flu web section updates its information about antivirals, National Influenza Vaccination Week, and more

CDC recently updated the following pages on its Seasonal Flu web section:

  • "Children and Antiviral Drugs" (importance of antivirals as a treatment option)
  • "Recommendations of the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP)" (added link to 2008-09 vaccine composition, dosage and administration, recommendations about specific populations)
  • "New! PSAs" (English- and Spanish-language PSAs on vaccinating children ages 6 months-18 years)
  • "NIVW Calendar of Events" (new activities for National Influenza Vaccination Week)
  • "Seasonal Influenza Vaccine Supply for the U.S. 2008-09 Influenza Season" (added spreadsheet of public health department clinics)
  • "Preventing the Spread of Influenza (the Flu) in Child Care Settings: Guidance for Administrators, Care Providers, and Other Staff" (content replaced)
  • "New! Ready-to-Use Articles for Media" (four sample articles attached with a new hyperlink)

To access these resources, go to: http://www.cdc.gov/flu/whatsnew.htm and click on the pertinent link.

To access a broad range of continually updated information on seasonal influenza, avian influenza, pandemic influenza, swine influenza, and canine influenza, go to: http://www.cdc.gov/flu

The National Influenza Vaccine Summit's website also contains extensive information and resources on influenza. Visit www.preventinfluenza.org often.

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5 Save the date: CDC's December 12 net conference to focus on influenza vaccination of healthcare personnel

The next "Current Issues in Immunization" net conference will be held on December 12 from 2PM to 3PM ET. This coincides with the 2008 observation of National Influenza Vaccination Week, which is scheduled for December 8-14.

Andrew T. Kroger, MD, MPH, will speak on influenza vaccination of healthcare personnel, and Alan Janssen, MSPH, will present case studies about influenza vaccination of healthcare personnel.

Registration is limited and will close on December 10 or when the course is full. To register, go to:
http://www2.cdc.gov/vaccines/ed/ciinc

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Immunization Action Coalition  •  1573 Selby Ave  •  St. Paul, MN 55104
tel 651-647-9009  •  fax 651-647-9131
 
This website is supported in part by a cooperative agreement from the National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases (Grant No. 5U38IP000290) at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in Atlanta, GA. The website content is the sole responsibility of IAC and does not necessarily represent the official views of CDC.